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back to article Three BILLION people now potential nodes for the transfer of cat videos

By the end of this year 40 per cent of the world will be on the internet, with 30 per cent of today's youth never knowing a world without IP. That's according to the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) which, when it's not secretly plotting for control of cyberspace, counts up some figures and bundles them into an …

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IPV6 IPV4

Surprised that the article didn't speak about IPV4 address space....3 Billion people, that only leaves 1 Billion address for industry...

And yet IPV6 still seems like it will be an eternity before it will become defacto for the unwashed masses.

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Anonymous Coward

Cats

There were once 101 useful uses of a dead cat, I believe that figure now stands at 153 and being a pet is not one of them.

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Trollface

Re: IPV6 IPV4

That's probably because 2 billion of them are sharing only a handful of addresses. Ah, the marvels of NAT... (Pardon, using Troll as best substitute for Sarcasm Mode).

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Re: Cats

I thought the cables were called cat 5 because that's the number of cat videos per second they are capable of handling. Was I mistaken?

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Unhappy

Just think...

Imagine how easy it will be for Big Gub'mint to keep track of all of us...becasue as we all know, the yout' of Amerika just don't care.

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DJO
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"This year that report shows mobile subscriptions approaching 6.8bn"

It's not just phones that have mobile subscriptions, all sorts of data-loggers including smart meters have a SIM inside to call home so it's not really fair to correlate the numbers of subscriptions to the global population.

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It's not just phones that have mobile subscriptions"

Yes, agreed. You know those video advert screens you see while queuing at the Post Office or waiting in the Doctors surgery? They've all got 3G dongles in them to get the new flash advert updates sent out overnight.

"Mobile phone subscriptions" are in some of the most unexpected places which don't equate to people/subscribers. No doubt many readers here will have even more examples.

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with 30 per cent of today's youth never knowing a world without IP

leaving 70% of todays youth who vaguely remember a time when they didn't see a targeted advertisement and know what a book is.

I just hope that those 70% teach their young ones that there was a time when there was privacy, little government data collection and little in the way of commercial data mining. A time when person and state were two separate entities, a time when the customer was the client and not the product.

And in doing so, encourage them to resist and oppose the slow and relentless commodification of the human being.

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Re: with 30 per cent of today's youth never knowing a world without IP

> And in doing so, encourage them to resist and oppose the slow and relentless commodification of the human being.

I think you might have missed the events in the Great Collectivist Societies of the 20th century?

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Fuck you, I'm an anteater.

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Oh gods...

Somehow I started reading an article about the spread of internet on the planet, and ended up at An Engineer's Guide To Cats.

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i bet

90% of today's youth wouldn't know what IP was (or even would know it had something to do with "internet")

I might bet more people might think it is related to iphone than something else.

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Setting Ourselves Up For Disaster?

I think of how much of my life somehow relies on the Internet - shopping, banking, information, communication at a minimum - and how many essential services now pretty much demand that you access them on-line.

I think about how less secure all of this is than we have been assuming (from either governments, corporations, or Bad Guys), and I think about the sheer size of some of the recent attacks on specific sites and services - can you say "bot-net" anyone?

I've pretty much concluded that we're fast approaching a day when suddenly a significantly large part of modern society will stop working with no warning. Whether by accident, incompetence, or malice really doesn't matter.

The frightening thing is this: twenty years ago it would have been hard to imagine a utility outage that could impact more than a small geographic area. The possible exceptions might be some major electrical outages that might touch a couple million people in a region.

Otherwise, when stuff broke, it was generally a local problem.

Now we're all relying on a large network which, although sold on the idea of being self-repairing, looks to me like it relies on a some pretty vulnerable weak spots - maybe DNS systems; maybe major fibre conduits, or the major hubs that data passes through. And let's not forget the ways that a government can close off some or all of the 'net. And that's not even considering the volume of data living in "Clouds" run by Amazon and others.

It seems to me that there's a looming possibility that one day a large part of the Internet that we rely on will come crashing down.

How much of your life would grind to a halt if the 'Net was unavailable for a day?

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Re: Setting Ourselves Up For Disaster?

How much of your life would grind to a halt if the 'Net was unavailable for a day? None?

Seriously, we use the net for stuff because it's slightly easier than going to the library or whatever. If it stopped working, a)someone would fix it pretty quickly, and b)in the mean time find something else to do, go for a walk, read a book, play a board game with your family.

I think you forgot your tin-foil-hat icon.

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De facto IPv6?

So, I expect there may de facto be a lot of teredo use for a good while, among people who want a publically accessible IP address. In short, I run miredo, I have a publically accessible IPV6 address even though I'm behind IPv4 NAT, and it's compatible with the few dynamic dns providers that support ipv6-only operation.

Miredo for Linux implements teredo fine (and inadyn supports ipv6 dynamic dns updates); Windows has teredo as well. You get an IPv6 address (out of a "reserved range" that still has enough bits to give a lot of addresses per IPv4 address...). It uses some tricky packet trickery to get a direct connection between 3 out of 4 main NAT types so teredo machines still can do direct connections. There are quite a few IPV4 to IPv6 gateways out of which it seems to pick the best one automatically. if I run traceroute6 it seems to find a pretty direct route in general.

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Life in the 21st century....

...Documents like this are intended to demonstrate that having access to the internet is, or should be, a normal part of 21st century life. The ITU got that access enshrined as a human right by the UN, but we're still a long way from extending connectivity to those other four billion people who need it...

Presumably this is the way the backbone providers lobby international organisations to get them to provide large tranches of taxpayer money for them to run projects which the market won't cover.

Anyone who really thinks about 'human rights' (as opposed to 'how you can make profit out of them) will probably come to two conclusions:

1 - The concept of 'human rights' is a vague, nebulous one which does not seem to have any real grounding in political philosophy, but is often used rhetorically to justify a wide range of political activity.

2 - If anyone wanted to really bring all of humanity up to some arbitrary minimum living standard, then the provision of fresh water and adequate sewage facilities would probably be first on the list by a long way. Internet connectivity would be way down the priorities.

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