Feeds

back to article MongoDB slurps $150m in mammoth funding round

Database upstart MongoDB has slurped $150m of filthy valley lucre to fund development of the NoSQL database in a sector dominated by the lumbering giants of Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft. The huge funding round was announced on Friday. Salesforce*, EMC and Altimeter Capital participated, along with existing investors Intel Capital …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

just make sure that, when your replica set loses half its members at once, it doesn't end up with a even number of nodes, or it will break in hilarious ways.

How we laughed!

Lovely in most other ways though, so can't complain too much.

1
0
Bronze badge

"Document-oriented" database?

I will have to look up what that might mean in the context of databases. Does it mean that the fields support mixed per-word or per-character italics, bold, underlining, and other attributes commonly seen in word processors? Does it mean that a field can contain a table (presentation table, as in what we see in spreadsheets) object?

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: "Document-oriented" database?

Without tearing it down, I think in it's simplistic nature it would basically be unions and structs in the C language (or class if in C++). However, I'm not sure how the data is stored exactly, I've haven't used SQL in many years, but I assume it would be either like a glob or literally individual files, but I'm not sure.

0
0

Re: "Document-oriented" database?

Exactly how Lotus Domino stores stuff, it would seem.

0
0

Re: "Document-oriented" database?

It means that it stores JSON documents. If you are coming from an RDBMS world, it trades off data consistency for easy replication and sharding. So it fits a lot of the use cases that are currently being served by Mysql replication.

0
0
Bronze badge

far more established?

Mysql seems even more established now than ever before, and it continues to further that establishment each day that goes by. I count MariaDB and whatever other MySQL forks out there as MySQL at this point since they are still quite compatible with each other. Also remember that MariaDB and others still must rely on InnoDB(also owned by Oracle) which is a pretty critical part of MySQL for most deployments -- I haven't noticed anyone talking about trying to (seriously) replace that (though I don't follow *sql too closely)

Perhaps at some point they will diverge(perhaps like the open source ZFS has had to go it's own way for the past several years), I don't know.

0
0

Re: far more established?

> they are still quite compatible with each other

Indeed. MariaDB is still a drop-in replacement, at least up to MySQL 5.6.

> MariaDB and others still must rely on InnoDB

Well... MariaDB does have the Aria filesystem.

> Perhaps at some point they will diverge

That is happening now with MariaDB v10, yes.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

They need to change its name. MongoDB is bordering on the offensive, and certainly not a name you could put in a presentation to your CTO or CIO.

1
0

And why not? It worked in Blazing Saddles...

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.