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back to article Office 365 goes to work on an Android

Unlike the video editing or CAD workstation beasts that are still utterly reliant on Windows, Android is slowly evolving into a workable platform for basic productivity. Browsers are becoming passable. Onboard applications are decent and there are an ever-growing number of applications designed for both touch input and mouse. …

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FAIL

"The allergy to mice in Chrome for Android is one example: Google sees mice in Android as a massive threat. Android is local-application based.

If people could use a keyboard and mouse with Android properly, then they would have no reason to move away from the local-application model. Google's future is bet on SaaS applications and tied to Chrome OS."

Eh? Android works perfectly fine with a mouse - the fact that it doesn't have right-click context etc is simply because it's designed for use with a touchscreen.

What are you on about?

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It's more than just right click. Click-and-drag highlighting is another key element missing.

The fact remains that simple functions which take fractions of a second to complete in a true mouse environment take multiple seconds to complete in a touch environment. Copy and paste is a great example. Touch is just not a "productivity"-based input model.

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Click and drag

It is missing, or rather it's replaced by the highlight with movable tabs (clicking on the word to copy for a second bringing up the endstop tabs which can then be dragged to cover the text block you want to highlight for copy or whatever). It's different, but it's no less usable, and can be a little more accurate sometimes depending on the size of block you want to deal with and how good your rodent skills are.

Indeed I was a little surprised at how much is supported. With a quick test on my Nexus 7 with a MS Intellimouse, it supported the thumb and pinky buttons too (thumb button for page back for example) and also the wheel-driven scrolling. Yes no right-click menu, but as the previous comment said that's down to design.

Plus pair the device with a keyboard (bluetooth or USB - full-sized or a keyboard cover as you see fit) and you're good to go for any kind of text input.

Also is the appearance of this article on the very day that Google throw Quickoffice into the ring a co-incidence or karmic timing (or editorial balance that other apps may exist, although if so Kingsoft Office may feel left out too) ?

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Anonymous Coward

"The allergy to mice in Chrome for Android is one example: Google sees mice in Android as a massive threat. Android is local-application based."

Dude, calm down for a minute.

Perhaps the reason that mice aren't fully supported but only okayish is down to the fact that fairly few people (1%? I'm guessing here.) ever connect a keyboard or mouse to their Android device and so there are more pressing issues to take care of?

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Chicken and egg. Most people don't use a key/mouse combo to extend the cabability of their tablet from "consume" to "produce" because the support sucks.

Back in the 90s we had a CD player, a Palm Pilot, a Cell Phone and a PMP for video. Most people wanted "one device that could do all of these things." People said things that sounded very much like you do now to discourage the rest of us from ever dreaming that we could get a single device that did all these things well.

Then Apple and Google came out and just fucking did it. They created an entirely new market and crushed their opponents like bugs.

Today there are all sorts of people saying "I wish I didn't have to bring a tablet along for portability and a notebook for productivity." I wish that I could simply use one device for all things!

Microsoft actually heard these people (holy shit!) but ultimately botched the roll out (no surprise there.) Like always, they saw a demand in the market but succumbed to terrible internal politics and decision-making that prevented them from turning a fantastic idea into a market-destroying superproduct.

People want to do more with fewer devices. We always have.

And there's always some dude in the background going "no, it's better to have multiple devices, each good at the one thing they do right!"

I'll give that a great big double-middle-fingered "nope" and keep on towards converged devices that "just work". One device. I only want to carry one device.

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Re: Pottie

"......Today there are all sorts of people saying "I wish I didn't have to bring a tablet along for portability and a notebook for productivity." I wish that I could simply use one device for all things!....." Er, did you forget the convertible tablet PCs like the hp TC1100? That is what Android needs for productivity - a docking station with keyboard and mouse which gives proper mouse capability, a full-size keyboard and output to a separate monitor, maybe even an USB printer - then detach the phone and put it in your pocket when you want to go somewhere and just consume. Then Office365 on Android would be completely useable (as long as you were within reach of your docking station). It seems there are no end of docking stations for stereo speakers, why not a desktop dock?

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Trollface

the digital equivalent of three miles to the gallon

Three miles to the gallon generally equates to 32DDs with endless legs on the fun stakes, your notebook analogy is flawed

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Anonymous Coward

>Perhaps the reason that mice aren't fully supported but only okayish is down to the fact that fairly few people

They are fully supported, since 2.3 - text selection these days is handled with bookend like tabs, it used to be more like a desktop. It was changed partly as tabs are much more accurate on a physically small display [read-tap asymmetry and all that] - but also for general productivity because they allow extension of the text selection in both directions with only a pointing device, instead of just one direction like a mouse on Windows.

HCI support on Android is a God-send for a lot of disabled users - head trackers, roller balls, joysticks all work out of the box - and the standard predictive virtual keyboard is better than most accessibility middleware on desktops.

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Re: the digital equivalent of three miles to the gallon

I have a cheap-arse Chinese Android tablet in a little leather wallet with a keyboard built into it; and that keyboard makes a huge difference to productivity. It doesn't (and can never) compete with a full-sized keyboard and mouse combo; but it's a grillion times better than using a screen keyboard.

The thing is that if you're after true productivity then you need the multi-dimensional user interface to support that. It just isn't going to happen if your display device is also your input device, no matter how clever the programming.

A docking station would do it; and there are several halfway house solutions (like the wallet with built in keyboard; bluetooth keyboard and pointer combos; laser keyboards and the like) that are all better than using the screen on it's own but all require an extra device and usually involve some other compromise (the bluetooth kb needs charging; the laser keyboard needs charging AND you need to adapt your typing style to the kb etc). I do have hopes for something like the Leap Motion pointing device but it's early days for that yet and they're still in the wanking about stage as far as software and productivity goes (from the look of the site...my toys budget has yet to allow me to buy one for testing personally).

We're probably going to end up with some sort of finger-tracking plus a virtual overlay in something like Google Glass but right here and now there isn't anything that can touch a keyboard/pointing device combo.

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Anonymous Coward

> I'll give that a great big double-middle-fingered "nope" and keep on towards converged devices that "just work". One device. I only want to carry one device.

OK - I'm the anon you responded to and probably a tad too late with my response but - point taken. 'd be nice to have.

So what you're saying is Win8 got the single-device idea right but failed on the implementation while Android got the idea wrong but succeeded with the implementation (of being one half of an outmoded multi-device policy) and should now make strides towards also becoming a system useable like an ordinary computer when having a keyboard and mouse connected. I get it.

Yet Google refrain from allowing us to use a mouse properly in Android because it would allow us to do stuff properly outside the browser in apps (or for that matter inside the browser) which would go against their browser-based business model since Android can easily be forked so they don't really like Android apps and... and... no, I still find that last bit incredibly far-fetched.

> to discourage the rest of us

Incidentally I'm not out to discourage anyone.

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Document to go on my 9320 and playbook work very well. They do lack a lot of functionality but to edit documents or get a lot of text to be formated later seems to be better than anything the article described.

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Documents to go is still a very touch-based input application. If you are willing to put up with an awful lot of frustration you can make it do something. My measure of it's effectiveness, however, is "how long does it take me to make the same document on the tablet that I can make on a netbook, where the document I am making is a simple blog for The Register, including several hyperlinks, a moderate amount of copying and pasting and some moving of blocks of text to get the right order of events?"

If the answer is "it takes more than 5% longer on the tablet" then I don't consider it to have a viable office package. It may have very nice document viewers. I may even have the ability to do minor markups in those viewers. But that's not an office suite. It's a PDF viewer with a commenting system that can handle office formats.

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For pure productivity you're right, a netbook will beat a tablet which cost more every time. Unfortunately most manufacturers don’t put out netbooks these days. I only got my playbook when my AA1 keyboard started to go.

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Using the 9320 as a bluetooth mouse (via the bridge) helps keep the frustration to a minimum. I do have a full sized bluetooth keyboard as well though.

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Many manufacturers make netbook-like products, though you have to pay a lot more. The Lenovo X-230 tha I am working on right now met all the requirements to finally be the first thing acceptable enough to replace my netbook. (Though it was bloody expensive.) The wife replaced hers with a similar model that had fewer bells and whistles in the $550 range.

That said, the playbook is better than most for productivity, but still not good enough to make up for lack of apps, amongst other issues. If only it had had e-mail from the start, it might well have had a real chance. Playbooks aren't bad devices, but they Microsofted the launch something fierce.

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>For pure productivity you're right, a netbook will beat a tablet which cost more every time. Unfortunately most manufacturers don’t put out netbooks these days. I only got my playbook when my AA1 keyboard started to

The "new Netbooks" are devices like the Ativ500t with dock or the similar Atom tablet pc. They have the same performance, a slightly better screen resolution than most netbooks and similar screen size.

Some people OTOH are replacing a scooter (Netbook) with a Hayabusu (Lenovo X230) and call that "minimum required".

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The Ativ500t is Windows 8. Fuck off. Windows 8 isn't a serious consideration for anything here. Besides, an Atom has terrible battery life.

12 hours minimum or go the fuck home..

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Anonymous Coward

"Windows 8 isn't a serious consideration for anything here"

For using Office 365? I would suggest it's probably the most popular platform used after Windows 7....And it's a significantly more powerful, secure and efficient OS than Android.

"Besides, an Atom has terrible battery life. 12 hours minimum or go the fuck home.."

Hardly any devices on any OS last 12 hours now:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ativ-smart-pc-500t-windows-8-atom,3360-11.html

But they are coming:

http://gigaom.com/2013/09/12/these-are-the-devices-that-will-kill-off-windows-rt/

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Funny, I have almost a dozen Android devices that give me over 12 hours, and a Windows 7 device that gives me 16.

Now, I'll admit the 16-hour device is not what I would traditionally call "portable" - it is a Lenovo X230 with the extended battery *AND* the underslung attachment battery - but it's a decent compromise when I was shopping for a netbook replacement. (Especially as I can choose to leave behind the underslung battery if I only need 8 hours and that cuts the weight in half.)

The Android devices do the thing, are perfectly secure, powerful, fast and basically do everything I could ever ask of them...except have a decent office package. (Unless I'm using Office 365 through Dolphin, which I usually do.)

Windows 8 isn't a consideration. It's complete, utter shit. Windows 9 might be decent, but I seriously doubt it. Microsoft's corporate attitude in general - but especially that of the endpoint divisions - are so utterly user hostile that I think it's safe to bet that the next several years' worth of endpoints are going to be worse, not better.

Desperation and repeated failure breeds fanatics. Fanatics aren't capable of rational thought. They collapse into an echo chamber where anyone who doesn't think like them is not merely wrong, they are evil. Their voices and opinions mustn't be heard.

This is where the Microsoft endpoint divisions find themselves.

They have dug themselves a deep hole and sealed themselves in. Outside thought, opinion, reason...it is viewed by them as hostile and treated as such. Increasingly, the few remaining fanboys are falling into the same category. I would liken them to an early-2000s Apple Mac mythology, but that would frankly be unfair to the Cupertinians; Microsoft and the banner-wrapping fandom that remain clucking after their endpoint products are way farther gone than the Macolytes of the past.

Microsoft doesn't do portable. When Microsoft can reach 12 hours of sustained usage that doesn't require outright lying about usage patterns or power metrics the rest of the world will be at 24. Microsoft has no desire or care to solve these problems. They don't feel it's relevant.

X hours - defined as roughly however long the existing technology lasts - is "good enough for anyone." In fact "what on the table today" is "good enough for anyone" which is part of the problem; so indoctrinated into this message are the very people making this technology that they have become unable to see where improvements are possible, let alone needed!

Microsoft have done many great things. Some parts of Microsoft will continue to do great things into the future...but the endpoint guys are a complete write off.

Changing the guard with Ballmer II: The Elop Boogaloo isn't going to change anything. Elop's eyes are as calloused as the rest.

Maybe - maybe - if they choose Satya Nadella as the new CEO they stand a hope in hell on the endpoint. That's a great big bloody maybe and it doesn't seem like powers that be are even capable of that level of rationality. Sad, really.

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The playbook was suppose to be a companion device for a BB phone. That's were the email lived and the playbook was just a bigger screen to read it. That way if the playbook was stolen, none of your data was compromised. The bridge is one of the things I am going to miss.

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Eh?

"still doesn't even have a word processor that can compete with Microsoft Word 2.0 running on Windows 3.1."

While I'll admit that many of them were hopeless even a couple of years ago, they are getting better and better all the time. Genuine competition does that. Kingsoft Office (there are three or four others that I've tried as well) is one of the gems and really does compete with Microsoft Word and other parts of the Office suite. It's not perfect, but then there are still hundreds of very long standing bugs and annoyances in Microsoft Word that have been in there for years. The point is, applications such as Kingsoft Office, even now, are likely to fulfill the editing needs of 99% of users. Although I ought to qualify that as "Western" as I have no idea how will it handles others text orientation systems or alphabets, something that Microsoft have invested a lot of time in.

What is better, and already mentioned above, is that because there are competing apps out there, they are genuinely competing with each other and producing better and better applications as a result, each revision with more efficiency, better usability and more features. This hasn't happened with Microsoft Office for a long time where prior to making it ugly and almost unusable for "Metro" the main changes have been re-skinning some of the front screens of the application and somehow making every application considerably slower and more bloated than the earlier releases.

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Neither does Microsoft ...

"still doesn't even have a word processor that can compete with Microsoft Word 2.0 running on Windows 3.1."

Neither does Microsoft since they introduced that stupid ribbon .....

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Re: Eh?

Touch-based apps like Kingsoft Office which have virtually zero support for mice (such as click-and-drag to highlight or any form or right-click support whatsoever) are worse than useless for productivity.

The ability consume content is worthless. The ability to make very minor changes then fire it back is almost as worthless. An office suite should be focused on productivity. "Push and hold, then fight with the stupid drag balls, then click the touch button, then drag, drag, drag, drag, darg, then spend a mintue fiddling with the damned thing to get the cursor where you want it, then push and hold, then push the button to paste" is not a productive work flow.

Until the office packages are optimized for content creation not content consumption I'll have no more regard for them than I do a PDF viewer.

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Coat

Re: Eh?

I never tried to run Word 2.0 on Windows 3.1, but I did run Word for Windows 2.0 ...

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Re: Eh?

Seriously, if you're selecting text use the shift/ctrl/arrow keys. If your pissing about with the mouse all the time you're just holding everyone else back.

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Related topic...

Would The Register consider a 'Top Ten Bluetooth keyboards' type article? Ta!

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Re: Related topic...

Extra marks if the article also considers the small things that make all the difference. EG.

1. The ability for the BT to pair with more than one device and switch between them; instead of having to delete the pairing and repair to swap.

2. Shortcut buttons for your mobile OS of choice (Android / iOS / Win mob, etc.). Things like Home, Back, Menu etc.

3. How long you have to wait before you can type after switching on or it auto sleeping.

4. Range in real-word situations (baring in mind that the handset may be next to the TV it's driving through HDMI)

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Re: Related topic...

All of the above, plus keyboard construction. The chiclet thing on a Transformer TF201 is passably decent (even if not Bluetooth). The membrane keyboards straight out of Spectrum 16-land are most certainly not.

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Re: Related topic...

I don't know; I'll ask around. There are a lot of bluetooth keyboards out there and that could get expensive, fast. What are people's favourite devices?

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Re: Related topic...

Thank you for responding Mr Pott! If ten keyboards (to fit in with the usual Reg format) is too costly, then perhaps just a couple of choice ones and a cheap and cheerful (?) unbranded model for comparison.

Was there ones a cunning fold-up yet full-size keyboard available for Palm devices, or did I just imagine it?

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Anonymous Coward

Office suites on Android (or iOS)?

AFAIK Android and iOS started off as mobile phone operating systems.

The LAST thing I want to do is word processing or spreadsheets on my Android phone or tablet.

Touch screens and office software aren't practical.

However... if Intel & the like have success with large tablets + keyboard & mouse, that'll be different.

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Re: Office suites on Android (or iOS)?

>The LAST thing I want to do is word processing or spreadsheets on my Android phone or tablet.

If I'm just entering text (with a view to editing and formatting it later when I'm back at a 'proper' computer), then the size of any screen or choice of OS isn't that important to me... I just want a compact device + keyboard so that I can type. This need could probably be fulfilled with a keyboard, a keylogger, an Altoids tin and a battery...

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Re: Office suites on Android (or iOS)?

A 7" tablet is a perfect size for portability. If I could have a Surface-style keyboard cover that had a little detachable mouse (maybe fold-up-int-a-PCMCIA-slot style affair?) I would be on that like white on rice. Bigger screen is better, but try wandering a convention with a 15" notebook! Even my 13" was bulky and awkward.

There are so many places where I go during my regular day that a tablet goes and a notebook just doesn't. Increasingly, I can't rely on there being a "proper computer" available when I get where I'm going! People use notebooks almost exclusively now. They take them with them when they go. If I want a PC for doing the thing I need to do then that often means I have to bring it with me.

Depending on how much I am doing, sure, I'd use a larger converged device. But in most cases I can work on a 7" widget since what I need it to get something typed up, rearranged, hyperlinked and fired off. (Or somethimes I need to edit a powerpoint, make substantial changes to a spreadsheet, etc.)

A 7" at 1280x720 is smallish, but not so small I can't read it from a sitting position on the table. Still, why not have devices that supported touch AND keyboard + mouse, both as FIRST CLASS input devices and available in a wide range of sizes and resolutions?

Was it do mad to dream that one day we could watch video, listen to music, browse the internet, organise our calendars, do e-mail and answer phone calls all on one device?

Why is it so mad to add "actually using the thing to create content" to that list?

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Apples and oranges

"Android is sneaking up on five years of general availability and it still doesn't even have a word processor that can compete with Microsoft Word 2.0 running on Windows 3.1."

Android in the majority runs on Tablets and Smartphones which are not particulary propice platforms for generating complex office documents, some small editing I can understand though. Comparing that to windows/MS Office which runs in majority on full blown PCS is not really a very fair comparison.

SmartPhone and/or tablets are just not very suitable platforms for complex document creation. No physical keyboard or mouse, forget it.

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Re: Apples and oranges

Bluetooth or USB. Suddenly a keyboard and mouse appear. That wasn't hard. Now, software, support it. Oh, it won't? Chicken and egg.

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Re: Apples and oranges

"Bluetooth or USB. Suddenly a keyboard and mouse appear. That wasn't hard. Now, software, support it. Oh, it won't? Chicken and egg."

Exactly the same can be said for the adoption of 'traditional' gamepads for Android tablets when playing appropriate games (or even for controlling media playback if the tablet is connected to a big TV).

I heard a BBC producer (of children's content) on the radio the other day... her information was that 60% percent of households with children in the UK own a tablet.

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Word Processor, not me.

TextWarrior to bang out the text then you move it to the desktop to pretty it up. Much less painful.

Google have just made QuickOffice free so maybe they do want people in Android (and even iOS) after all.

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Anonymous Coward

Office in a tiny screen, a world of hurt.

Got serious office work to do ?

Do it on anything less than a 20 inch screen and you are asking for a visit to the opticians followed by the psychiatrist.

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Re: Office in a tiny screen, a world of hurt.

I regularly edit documents in LibreOffice on a 1280×800 pixel display. I haven't measured the actual panel size, but it'd be around the 13~14" mark.

Yes, there's an awful lot of 10" and smaller tablets that exceed that screen resolution, and I seem to recall editing documents on a 15" 640x480 screen many moons ago without problems. (Microsoft Write for Windows 3.1 was the tool of choice for my cash-constrained primary school.)

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Odd article.

I have an asus transformer prime. I have four office suites and they all do the same much ness. The only reason I have five is each one is slightly different but you can only open one document at a time, so document comparison means you need two.

I have 'docs to go', 'kingsoft office', 'office suite pro' and 'polaris office'. I use the transformer prime docking station keyboard and it works fine.

Don't have much problem firing off word docs of excel spreadsheets. I don't use a mouse but the trackpad works, and a few oddities aside they do the basic job. Meaning I rarely touch my desktop. (Long since ditched M$)

Only issue I find is file types, my libre office has a habit of screwing up the .xls format so on the android tablet and phone they become unreadable. I won't be touching 365 office as it is cloud based, but my galaxy note 2 and asus transformer prime do great typing and copying when needed.

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Re: Odd article.

I have an ASUS transformer as well, and the thing is damned near useless for anything excepting very minor document editing. Highlighting text, cutting and pasting are multi-second each affairs. If you do that (on average) 100 times per document - not remotely "out there" when writing something for others to consumer - this "multi-second each" thing starts to become a real drain on productivity. Especially since with a proper keyboard and mouse I can do all those activities as sub-second items.

Inability to open multiple documents is a big one, but lack of consistent keyboard shortcut support - and virtually non-existant highlighting or right-click support - are the big ones. Going from a browser to a document to copy links and back again (to do research) isn't exactly smooth. Everything about tablet UIs is designed for this "one thing a time" monofocus. It's slow, and ponderous and based on the idea that your time has no value, so you don't mind take a few extra seconds to do everything.

If I have an Asus Transformer and a shitty, beat-up, wrteched old netbook from 5 years ago, I'll choose the netbook. The Transformer is more portable, but the netbook won't leave me wanting to strangle someone by the time I'm done writing an article.

I still carry the Transformer most places. Because it's portability is far better. Yet every time I have to sit down and RDP into something because it needs fixing, or bash out an article, complex e-mail or what-have-you, I picture the slow-roasting of various Microsoft executives who botched the Surface launch.

Their widget could have been - should have been - the solution to all these ills. Why, why, why did they have to screw it up?

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Having now used a Surface RT I wouldn't bother trying to get office working on a droid tablet.

Better corporate integration with intune, citrix receiver for x86 apps, and that all important USB port for when you need more than a touchpad. At the original price it was too much for the home market and wasn't pushed hard enough for corporate. Silly really, they're a fantastic piece of kit.

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Agree wholeheartedly. The Surfaces are the best tablet idea so far. If only Microsoft hadn't alienated the entire developer community and most of their end users by refusing outright to listen to them about anything, locking away the desktop from tablet-mode users and pissing on the "fully connected" UI.

Microsoft had good tech. What they screwed up was the community engagement and pretty much every single detail of implementation. I wish Apple had made the surface. They'd have botched the first version, but the "8.1" version would have been amazeballs.

Instead, we got "always on" that "plays for sure" and a whole great big pile of "nope".

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Why does there have to be "one device to rukle them all"?

Look, I'll admit that I'll be thrilled if / when I have a single device that does EVERYTHING that I can imagine, from being a pocketable phone with passable web browsing and e-mail, right up to a full immersive 3D gaming platform and "content creation" workstation - but I think we're still a way off yet.

My current mix is a phone (Nexus 4), a compact tablet (Nexus 7 2013, with a compact Bluetooth keyboard for those increasingly rare occasions when touch-screen typing just isn't "good enough"), and a 15" Windows 7 notebook (with a full-size keyboard, mouse and a secondary 22" monitor when I'm at my desk), which is my machine for doing "real work". Interestingly, this machine spends an awful lot of time gathering dust these days - because it turns out that most of the time, I just don't really NEED a full-on heavy-duty content-creation workstation! It's actually a bit too big and cumbersome for everything other than really serious work - it's become more of a desktop-replacement machine than a true portable device, especially since I got a tablet that does most of what I want. I'm contemplating moving over to something much more compact (such as a Chromebook or similar) for this "mobile desktop" work.

I'm afraid Microsoft has pretty much missed the boat on mobile computing for me - they haven't noticed that for many people, something that is compact and cheap (or better yet, free), and "good enough" meets most of their needs. Microsoft want me to buy a subscription to MS-Office 365, but I'm sorry - for my limited requirements for truly mobile computing, the cheap / free alternatives (Docs to Go, Quickoffice, etc) on an affordable tablet are plenty good enough - both with respect to the somewhat restricted feature set of these "Mobile Office " software packages, and the general limitations of mobile devices compared to "proper" computers. When it comes to "mobile computing", the mobility, convenience, and low cost are more important than 100% MS-Office compatibility and functionality.

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Re: Why does there have to be "one device to rukle them all"?

"Why does everyone want a palm pilot a PMP an MP3 player and a phone all in one device? We're a long way off from that yet. It's better to just carry around multiple devices that are each the best at what they do."

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Personally, I paid the bucks for Textmaker

It ain't Word, and it is a little choppy even on a Tegra 3, but it does the job.

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I use Kingsoft Office on my rooted NOOK, works like a champ and is free!

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Anonymous Coward

Keyboards for the win, till speech really is recognised

I can really appreciate the sentiment behind this article and as the trend is for larger and larger phones I'm looking to a future where we can really have a truly personal computer that we carry around in our pockets.

If I was going to try to adopt this system I'd use a generic tablet with JellyBean at the very least. Nexus 7 would be great if you weren't compelled to save to the cloud ( which lets face it, is big brothers pocket.)

I'd get a bluetooth keyboard, I only wish they would sell ergonomic models, and I would learn to do everything with the keyboard. Lets face it, mousing is too slow and, as accurately explained in the article, only an ant can select text with the touch screen with any accuracy.

Someday the speech recognition will make the keyboard redundant until, that is, we want to type something in a cafe without anyone hearing.

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Re: Speech recognition

#include <iostream>

int main (int argc, char *argv[])

{

std::cout << "I can see speech recognition working really well here." << std::endl;

return 0;

}

#ifndef SORRY

#define SORRY "I just had to"

#endif

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Re: Keyboards for the win, till speech really is recognised

Matias do a lovely version of their Pro series which explicitly support connecting to mobile devices via Bluetooth. Might be worth a look.

(I'm quite fond of my Unicomp IBM-based keyboard, but I have an older Matias Tactile Pro sitting next to it for when I feel like a change of feel.)

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