back to article Microsoft reissues September patches after user complaints

Problems with Microsoft's last round of operating system and application patches have forced the company to reissue part of the update on Friday. "Since the shipment of the September 2013 Security Bulletin Release, we have received reports of updates being offered for installation multiple times, or certain cases where updates …

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Those three buggered office patches are still "installing" and then immediately downloading again.

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Facepalm

Yep, the Office 2003 update and two Office 2007 updates are continually downloading and trying to install even though they're already installed twice now.

Well done Microsoft! ;-)

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Facepalm

Who's coding and testing the updates?... the interns?

I mean, come on!; in the article I counted a total of eleven patches that were re-issued or pulled, out of how many? Twenty-five? Did MS hire a bunch of cheap noobs for the job? Or did they outsource the coding to Elbonia?

It's totally shameful, isn't it?.

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Trollface

Re: Who's coding and testing the updates?... the interns?

One would think they put their Win 8 UI team in charge of testing or something.

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Try Music

Suggest playing Clarence Carter's 'Patches' during updates because they've been so sorry lately.....

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Can I update now?

Purely coincidentally I kept dismissing the update notification because I was always busy doing something and didn't just update like I normally would have, so is it safe to update now?

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FAIL

And I thought it was just me

I installed the patches from late August. Immediate BSOD.

Nothing like manually rolling back 19 patches. One. At. A. Time.

Most of it .NET crap.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: And I thought it was just me

None of those patches is likely to have caused a BSOD. Especially the .Net ones. Look elsewhere for the cause of that....

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Anonymous Coward

Meanwhile in Linux Land

All the flowers smell wonderful, the birds are tweeting, the sun is out and everyone is having a jolly nice time.

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Linux

Re: Meanwhile in Linux Land

"All the flowers smell wonderful, the birds are tweeting, the sun is out and everyone is having a jolly nice time."

And best of all, not having to pay money to Microsoft to enjoy all the fun that comes with Patch Tuesday!

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Linux

Re: Meanwhile in Linux Land

All the flowers smell wonderful, the birds are tweeting, the sun is out and everyone is having a jolly nice time.

Providing that we are being sensible, using a stable or long term distribution and using compatible repositories (rpm), and perhaps being careful with backports (Debian). Which I imagine we all are for 'production' machines.

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Coat

You put your patch in

You pull your patch out

You put your patch back in

And you shake it all about.

You do the hokey pokey,

And you turn your computer off and on.

That's what it's all about!

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Linux

Guess

I'm delaying the patching for another week... and damn glad I always delay it a week from issuing anyways

Oh well back to linux boxes that never need patchin... oh bugger....... well at least I dont have to reboot them 37 times per patch

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Re: Guess

Meh, I wandered into work Wednesday morning to see I had been "patched Wednesday'ed" … with my work laptop booted and displaying the KDE display manager in place of the Windows 7 desktop where I left it.

I reboot (I needed to use VMWare player) and no sooner does Windows 7 boot up, but it immediately shuts down again to install another patch (!).

Then yesterday it did almost a repeat performance.

Thankfully, my main workhorse runs Gentoo, and hence does exactly what I tell it.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Guess

"well at least I dont have to reboot them 37 times per patch"

Unless of course it's one of the ~950 kernel patches issues to date...

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Re: Guess

Unless of course it's one of the ~950 kernel patches issues to date...

I think you'll find the kernel has had a lot more than 950 patches applied to it. Orders of magnitude more.

The difference here though, in Linux, unless my OS is particularly ancient, I can go direct from one kernel revision to the next without having to pass the ones in between. Microsoft's patches seem to be applied incrementally, which means I need the one that goes before it before I install the next one, and a reboot each time.

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Sept.14th....I have just attempted to install the latest re-issue of these updates and still have 10 failures!

Some of them are for the ".net framework" and others are for general security issues.

Running a standard windows 7, 64 bit system here.

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Zot
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[Shakes had slowly]

[Goes to next article with disinterested eye-rolling]

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Anonymous Coward

This .Net patchwork of which you speak

Other than the ATI Catalyst Control Panel, which is relatively avoidable. afaik nothing I have near me uses it.

Who is actually using this stuff? Do MS use it for anything? Do the patches arrive whether or not there's a .NET-based application on the system?

I've got a couple of XP boxes and one Win7, is this .NET business one of the advantages of keeping up to date?

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Re: This .Net patchwork of which you speak

the mechanism for adding a client (from the client) to a Small Business Server uses the .net 4 framework.

it seems to me if you've installed any of the .NET framework versions, then WSUS will find out and proffer the updates.

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The Microsoft reorganization

It begins!

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Trollface

The story

Was filed under 'security', surely 'incompetence' would be a more suitable section?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: surely 'incompetence' would be a more suitable section?

"The story was filed under 'security', surely 'incompetence' would be a more suitable section?"

I was thinking "management".

But sometimes it's hard to tell the two apart.

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Mushroom

Complexity.

At some point the complexity of the Microsoft world will cause it to collapse. Perhaps it has started?

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This is not the first time that I've had Office patches continually downloading and reinstalling themselves.

Oh, I don't even *have* office (well, not a microsoft office) , so did I really need those patches anyway?

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I switched my computer on and it booted straight to my KDE desktop and everything was fine AS USUAL

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Anonymous Coward

Just more proof of the obvious

Microsucks is totally INCOMPETENT.

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Re: Just more proof of the obvious

Eadon ?

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Bronze badge

Holy Jumping Geared Legs, BATMan!

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/17/science/gearlike-legs-propel-a-european-jumper.html

Are the patches and bug fixes going to leapfrog, umm, leapbug the baddies?

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Anonymous Coward

The main problem is that most of Microsoft still runs on a mixture of Windows XP, Windows 98 (the finance teams) and coloured crayons and paper (the board and senior execs). The only equipment Ballmer has in his office is an iMac that's never been switched on because he's not quite sure where the power lead goes and an old palm pilot that his PA uses to run the great man's diary.

The development teams were outsourced to CSC and Accenture in 2003, and they run various flavours of Linux on VMware. A single PC, a Compaq 486/33 box, is kept aside for native Windows testing, should it be needed. The 'Raymond Chen' blog is run by a team of 75 smart independent developers somewhere in Russia and they use a self-developed forked version of Windows that no longer runs on PCs.

It's only the reception desk that actually actually runs Windows 7 and 8.1 on anything modern to give the right impression for visitors.

I think this is why problems are occasionally missed.

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Anonymous Coward

I bet the down vote was from 'Raymond Chen'

Or one of the 75 developers being him.

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Facepalm

WIndows Update

As all here know keeping ones security up to date is top of the list when dealing with servers (actually, any platform to be fair) and when it comes to MS server software that means updating from windows update as part of that. But I *loathe* doing it as there's always a chance they stuff something up, and every so often Microsoft issue something that's the server equivilent of Ebola. This patch tuesday has caused me an awful lot of work and I'm not very pleased. I can deal with users knackering their installs, but it hacks me off when the people who should know what they're doing cause the issue.

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Nursery rhyme

Big patches have little patches

Upon their backs to right 'em

And little patches have lesser patches

And so, ad infinitum.

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Could have been worse

I counted 32 patches on my Win 7 laptop this morning all OK.

At work, patching is handled by a managed up date tool and other than being longer than usual (50 updates!) it had been delayed long enough to avoid the madness.

Patch in haste, repent at leisure

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Came here to see if there was any interesting/relevent comments adding content to the article. As usual, (when Microsoft is mentioned) nothing.

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"...between management and the software testing teams"

What software testing teams?

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Joke

MS seem to have achieved the first certifiable AI.

It is sufficiently complex, that a given set of input produces completely unexpected results in a non-repeatable fashion.

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FAIL

If Bill G had still been in charge...

.....it is more likely this would not have happened.

M$oft is going to the dogs.

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