back to article Watchdog mulls SOCA's secret dossier of private dicks 'hired to hack, blag'

The UK's privacy watchdog is now investigating whether corporate giants and others breached the Data Protection Act by hiring private eyes who allegedly hacked systems and blagged personal records. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has received a list of 98 companies and individuals probed by the Serious Organised …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

Lots of PIs are ex job anyway.

My guess is quite a few were ex there, and some very slipping 50 quid notes for info from old mates.

I have no problem with this, in fact I'd industrialise it, so they know who is trying to find out what.

3
0
Gold badge
Unhappy

Re: Lots of PIs are ex job anyway.

"My guess is quite a few were ex there, and some very slipping 50 quid notes for info from old mates."

Probably.

But as we know now why hire a bent copper when knowing someone from the RSPCA is just as good and a lot cheaper.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

won't any (eventual) ICO fine

be the sort of sum that would buy a bunch of Bananas in Aldi?

....(very poor reference here to the Private Eye 'if this is justice, then I'm a Banana' meme)

1
0
Anonymous Coward

"could result in a prosecution against the customers of dodgy private dicks."

Could but probably won't.

I know somebody who's probably been on this list, and the probable customer of the dodgy PI could well be a top ten UK law firm, working for a possibly state owned bank, whose employees are busy trying to hold the lid on widespread fraud.

From what I've seen so far, both from this friend's actual experience, and from the fact that SOCA sat on their fat over-pensioned arses and did nothing for years, I'm guessing that the old boy network will make sure nobody is held to account other than the handful of cannon-fodder PIs. What's particularly unimpressive is that this friend was on a witness protection programme as a key witness for the SFO during this time.

2
0
M7S
Bronze badge

I'm in favour of employees or agents of bodies to whom we must hand over data under force of law (public authorities etc) being held personally liable for careless/reckless loss. A conviction, possibly with jail time, should prevent them being re-employed thus ensuring "that lessons really are learned".

For private companies, the ICO should have a range of options, possibly including the right to withdraw their permission to hold/process data (perhaps with 30 days notice to prevent absolute chaos). That really would be fun to watch. Once permission has been withdrawn from a company, with almost the certainty of corporate failure, you can be sure that pressure from disgruntled (ex-)customers, shareholders etc will ensure that other companies rapidly take their responsibilities much more seriously.

0
0
Unhappy

I'm still waiting for justice for the thousands deprived of employment by the employment blacklisting. I suspect Similar for the illegal acquisition of data by various companies/people. Both the higher echelons of the police, and the government, are steeped in corruption.

1
0
Silver badge
Coat

Operation Millipede?

Hmm, that operation has legs...

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums