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back to article BILLION DOLLAR BALLMER: Microsoft chief makes $1bn simply by quitting

Steve Ballmer has just seen his personal wealth surge by a cool $1bn after announcing his retirement from Microsoft - which immediately caused the company's stock to soar close to a 12-month high on Wall Street. The software vendor, which trades on Nasdaq under the MSFT banner, saw its shares initially surge by close to 9 per …

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Anonymous Coward

"As of March 2013, Forbes said that Ballmer was worth more than $15bn - slapping the billionaire right in the middle of its top 100 list of stupidly rich people. "

In Mr. Ballmers case the 'ly' on the end of stupidly is optional.

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Clearly he rose from one of the original members of the company when tiny to running it when gigantic by being stupid.

I very much doubt he is stupid. Out of touch, yes. Eccentric and with poor social skills, yes. Stupid... no.

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Trollface

Dumb Luck

Yes just because you pull the luckiest dorm room assignment in history and bunk up with Bill G at Stanford doesn't mean riding his coat tails to mega riches is easy. You can't be dumb really but being an unimaginative sweaty cheerleader does help until you are required to steer the company of course.

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> original members of the company when tiny to running it when gigantic by being stupid.

Only because of Bill Gates which is why Ballmer wasn't shit canned years ago. Bill doesn't have a lot of friends before he was rich so I am sure he is loyal. I am no fan of Billy G but he has done a whole lot more in in his life than the placeholder that is Ballmer.

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Steve Ballmer is an excellent salesperson and he's rather intelligent and very nice in person. Where he isn't very strong is in identifying need and product positioning: he's fairly easily convinced something is a good idea and once he's convinced something is a good idea he'll ram it down everyone's throats, whether its actually a good idea or not. He doesn't listen I dissenting voices much. That can be useful and it can be a hiderance, for him I believe it's hurt more than helped.

This is good, it was time for him to move on. But it is wrong to think the man is a fool or a toady because of some poor products. He's not dumb, he's just wrong (quite a bit).

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Re: Dumb Luck

Harvard, not Stanford

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In Mr. Ballmers case the 'ly' on the end of stupidly is optional

The question being, if you're so smart, why aren't you rich?

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JLV
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Headmaster

well...

This is great news, Ballmer leaving. The investors seem to think so.

One way or another this dude rubbed me the wrong way. From chair throwing to Linux cancers to Metro to Office ribbons.

He's an *ss, far as I am concerned.

But regardless of what we think of him, he's NOT stupid in the basic IQ definition sense of it. His wikipedia entry states a 800 on Math SAT. i.e. 100%, no error. Not godlike, but impressive by any standards. And magna cum laude Harvard Math + Economics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Ballmer

Good riddance.

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Re:

Spot on mate!

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Re: In Mr. Ballmers case the 'ly' on the end of stupidly is optional

There is also the matter of luck....

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"he's fairly easily convinced something is a good idea and once he's convinced something is a good idea he'll ram it down everyone's throats"

This means that the technical direction at Microsoft can be controlled by a few people working behind the scenes who have Steve's ear. Rather than leading a competent technical group to a consensus on what should be done, just grab him, point him in your preferred direction and he bulldozes over everyone else.

In my opinion, this isn't a good way to run a high tech company. When you hope to be out on the bleeding edge (where Microsoft isn't more often then not), you have to get the input of numerous field specialists. And these sorts of people are put off quite easily by the monkey boy, chair throwing antics. So the question is: Will the people behind the curtain, pulling Ballmer's chain allow a consensus builder into his position? Or will they pull for another version of him, just to protect their turf?

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Anonymous Coward

Never really understood why someone who was proving to be a failure didn't decide to go earlier.

I can only assume he enjoys the power.

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Anonymous Coward

People - in general - enjoy the paycheck and benefits (which may include power).

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WOW!

Only 12 months till Microsoft can start digging themselves out of the shit.

Leave sooner Steve, there's another $bil in it for you...

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Re: WOW!

They sold all the shovels to boost quarterly performance and please the shareholders.

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Getting that much money for quitting/getting sacked?

Who does he think he is, a Chelsea manager?

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Pirate

Worth?

He may have $15bn in the bank, but I wouldn't say he's worth that much given his track record...

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Re: Worth?

I would say he actually is worth exactly that.

(Other people think things are worth stuff that have no relation to actual assets / cash).

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Ballmer at Microsoft: an annotated shareprice

http://ftalphaville.ft.com/2013/08/23/1612263/ballmer-at-microsoft-an-annotated-shareprice/

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The market gives a clear comment on his abilities

A big ego-knock, but I guess $1 billion makes it a tad less difficult to swallow...

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JLV
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Boffin

Re: The market gives a clear comment on his abilities

You know, I am wondering about that. He'll have made a $1B extra when he sells them, not before. For now, it's unrealized gains, not money in the pocket.

As an 'employee with access to material information' or whatever the term is for employees with access to insider info, he will be restricted to sell and buy shares at only certain open periods.

So, for example, a CEO can't buy/sell right before quarter results are announced. That's insider trading.

Did he resign during an open trading period? Will his resignation have triggered an "insider knowledge event" that would have precluded him from trading? Disclaimer: I have no idea if there is such a concept or if it applies to this type of event.

Heck, even if fully legal, would he have anticipated such a valuation jump and planned ahead to benefit from it, if that planning was required? As in "I suck so much that the stock is bound to go up so I'll go long"? Requires a lot of self-awareness, that. ;-)

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Re: The market gives a clear comment on his abilities

No CEO buy or sell there shares anymore. They just borrow huge amounts of money using their shares as capital at preferential interest rates.

On that basis Ballmer has a 1 beeelion more capital to buy that new yacht, airplane, small country he always wanted

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> which immediately caused the company's stock to soar close to a 12-month high on Wall Street.

That must be a big blow for the ego.

It's like leaving a party and everyone saying, "Thank f*ck for that".

http://threewordphrase.com/thisisyou.htm

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Devil

How about...

If a company's share price surges on the announcement of someone's resignation, that person's shares should be forfeit for being such a negative influence on the company.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How about...

How about...

grow up.

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Joke

Re: How about...

No. And you're not the boss of me.

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Stop

Re: How about...

Just great... thanks for putting the theme tune to Malcolm in the Middle in my head!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How about...

A company I worked for that allocated shares as incentives and rewards did have quite a comprehensive section in the company share agreement about whether those shares would be forfeited or distributed depending on the conditions under which an employee left - probably most companies do.

Sadly the company went tits-up before they could honour my shares!

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Happy

Re: How about...

Hmmmm.... On the same lines as "You're not the Boss of Me", how about:-

"Someone keeps moving my chair"

or better still:-

"Don't Lets Start".

Argh.... the earworms have got me!

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Facepalm

2013: Microsofts year of hell

But only for its users and shareholders.

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Best money they have ever spent!

Good riddens to the slimey salesman stroke yobbo! He is a disgrace! Just goes to show you that lacking any ability or redeeming qualities is no barrier to becoming extremely rich!

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Offensive.

Then again, the shenanigans of the Very Rich usually are.

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Anonymous Coward

What a kick in the teeth!

Still, I suppose he'll be pleased about the money, and he never bothered before about the world's opinion of him, so I don't suppose he'll cry now.

With that much money, I don't suppose I would either.

Now, without being spurred on by Gates or held back by Balllmer, we'll get to see what Microsoft is made of.

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Re: What a kick in the teeth!

Makes for one hell of an exit interview though !!!

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Stop

Give the guy a break.

He did provide us with two very entertaining videos: "Developers! Developers! Developers!" and "Monkeydance". This puts him two ahead of, for example, Bill Gates or Larry Page or Steve Jobs, or every reality TV /find-a-star show ever.

Is his work worth the obscene pile of cah he'll wind up with? Well, in all honesty, probably not but it is notoriously hard to put a price tag on such high quality entertainment.

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Happy

@Silent_count - Re: Give the guy a break.

Wrote :- He did provide us with two very entertaining videos

At least three actually :-

www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGvHNNOLnCk

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Re: Give the guy a break.

Ach! Now you've put the thought in my head that he could be the next Ed McMahon!

Here, have it back!

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Re: Give the guy a break.

He did do us the massive favour of easing Sinovsky out before freeing up the job. If you think it's been bad with monkey boy in charge, Ballmer is just ramming bad product down throats, Sinovsky actually believes there's nothing wrong with it.

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Re: Give the guy a break.

@Nuke: I stand corrected. The man's comic genius knows no bounds. It really is too bad that they made him the CEO rather than just giving him a department, with very little oversight, so he could let his creativity run wild.

@Paul Shirley: I do have a little sympathy for Steve Sinofsky. I honestly believe he was one of the few who at least tried to help MS make better products. Apart from a few, admittedly substantial, screw-ups with the UI, Win8 is a solid OS, as was/is Win7.

As for the UI changes, which many (me included) think are dumb, there's still no start menu and you still needlessly have to put up with metro on a desktop pc. Sinofsky would rightly get the blame for having made the initial changes but the man is gone and it's not like anyone at MS has since said that these ideas were dumb so let's revert them. The brains trust at MS must presumably think these changes are a good idea otherwise they'd have been fixed the day after Sinofsky left.

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Hopefully whoever gets to be in charge of MicroSoft next, they'll get to work expediting Windows 9 and bring back some lost sanity, form Windows Hate. I doubt much will change on the Office front. I'd be surprised if we ever see another Boxed Copy of Office again.

But, really even post Ballmer... Can we really expect things to get better at MicroSoft?

It seems to me that they had already crossed every line. Save making Windows itself a virtual Service, al-la Office365. And, I'm sure Steve is still kicking himself over that oversight too...

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Don't cheer yet

With Ballmer decimating the executive ranks just bringing in a new CEO won't be enough. He will need to bring a new team with him. With the encouraged infighting and Ballmer running off any executive with any ambition or vision (not talking about Steve S.) Microsoft is going to need a lot of new blood to turn things around.

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Linux

Re: Don't cheer yet

I am praying that they bring in Carly Fiorina. After the job she did at HP, I would love to see what she coul do to Microsoft. :)

I am not a religious person, but if they brought her in I would have to reconsider. :)

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Pint

Re: Don't cheer yet

Fiorina? Are you friggen serious? I'd have to extend my HP procurement ban (due solely to her) to include MS.

Hmmm... Come to think of it, we've not bought much from MS lately (other than XBox) due to our existing Win8 procurement ban.

Can we find some CEO candidates that DON'T have a serious personality disorder?

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Fiorina would be brilliant

She would gut that bloated whale and make sushi out of it before she finished brushing her hair on the first Monday morning.

Then she'd spend three years making sure that anybody who didn't hate Microsoft yet started doing so.

The she'd leave with a hearty self-congratulatory patting on the back and a ginormous check in her purse.

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Not a job I'd particularly fancy...

Dunno if Id want the vacant spot. Think the end of term report would look something like:

Key Product Lines:

Desktop - Windows 8 - only selling because it comes free with a box of CoCo Pops.

Mobile Phones - the fat kid at sports day; makes it over the line, but breathless and well behind the posh kids. Only parents and best mate cheering.

Servers: Passing required exams, but only achieving grade C. Copies the other kids for virtualisation skills.

Cloud Services: People buying the service (better to have an ongoing Chinese burn than be punched in the face after school).

Games Consoles: Treats people like idiots. Believes a flashy presentation beats the content. No resilience of strategy. (See Me)

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Why do I keep humming....

Ding Dong the witch is dead.

He ain't gone yet.

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Allright!

Ballmer the Salesman deserves his money, he did greatly help build that company. I dealt with him f2f and have reason to say that. Good for him.

But whatever Microsoft is going to do (other than curate Office), Ballmer is not the one to lead it there.

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Be thankful

I don't understand the strong emotions displayed here. Most of us have been fortunate to live in times when companies were built on the passion of the founders for the products they delivered. HP, Bill Gates, SteveJobs, Larry Ellison, etc., even the Facebook guy. When they go, the company faces problems. What should drive the company now? This is nothing new - look at Ford, Sony, Panasonic, and many more. Hate Balmer if you want, but putting 'the blame' on him makes no sense. Just be thankful we got to witness these weird and wonderful companies in their beginnings.

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Coat

I can hear the phone call now.....

Excuse me, Mr Icahn, I think we've found a great opening for you .......

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