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back to article Is that a flash stick in your pocket, VMware, or are you pleased to see us?

VMware has, in your correspondent's opinion, punched below its weight in data storage. Undue respect for drive arrays has inhibited its ambitions. This is about to change, though, as the company begins to take responsibility for providing primary storage to applications, and also networking. Let's consider the basic IT trio of …

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K
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You raise some interesting ideas.. Yet I don't see this happening any time soon, the cost is the prohibiting factor. SME's have been major driving force behind Virtualisation in the past 3-4 years, the simple reason is it was cost effective and offered a large number of benefits.

What your describing had a lot of potential, but the technology behind it will come with a massive premium, putting it out of reach for your average SME. There are already a couple of players who offer a similar system, Nutanix and Scale Computing being ones that springs to mind, but they are at best niche providers.

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EMC buying ScaleIO will pave the way for VMware to have a storage hyper-visor that is worth deploying.

As with ViPR it makes sense to have the storage company develop the storage tech and then transfer it to VMware rather than transferring the engineers to VMware.

I think ViPR, or a subset of, will end up at VMware. But EMC will keep a version of it in their camp as a hedge against Microsoft/OpenStack/<Insert next big thing in server virtualisation>.

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@K. The whole idea of SDS as VSA is saving storage CU by using JBODs or internal media. The multi-core processors with storage CU software running in partition may deliver limited functionality with good enough performance for SMEs with lower investments in material costs. Software can be multiplicated indefinitely so the cost s/b reasonable.

Summary

Emulating shared block-access storage area network (SAN) system on internal DAS storage (running in virtualization partition)

The server SW acts as SAN array controller software

A pair of servers with high amount of direct-accessed storage (DAS), accessed by other servers across a network

LeftHand Networks pioneered, evolved as HPs StoreVirtual (VSA), NetApp’s ONTAP Edge, Nexenta, StorMagic (SvSAN), Nutanix , ScaleIO (acq. by EMC)

Mellanox Storage Accelerator VSA product accessed over Ethernet or InfiniBand supports DAS & SAN promise better performance

Saves HBAs, switches, Physical CU price

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Anonymous Coward

"but the technology behind it will come with a massive premium, putting it out of reach for your average SME"

Erm no - it's already coming in Server 2012 R2 (distributed storage, automatic tiering, deduplication, Flash cache, migration compression, multipoint replication, disk pooling, continuous availability, snapshots, differencing disks, etc, etc. out in a month or so - and many of those features are also in the totally free Hyper-V server 2012 R2...

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K
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"it's already coming in Server 2012 R2"

Does server 2012 also come with the Flash-cache that you will need??! I'll buy a dozen copies :)

this article refers to several flash-caches including Fusion-IO cards which will set you back anywhere from £7,000 to £12,000 for each individual card.. multiple that by the number of servers the average SME has and there you have the answer..

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Childcatcher

More for Virtual Desktops

I would guess this will have more impact on VDI efforts than for servers as more organizations move toward virtualizing the desktop. At least that is my guess as there should be proportionately more workstations than servers in a given organization. Too, I wonder what impact, if any, it might have on application virtualization.

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Anonymous Coward

But what about Virsto? Surely VMware would just use that.

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Fast Garbage Dumps

The model is definitely swinging back to local storage. SSD and RDMA will revolutionize the storage/compute landscape but the vast quantities of low value data we produce will continue to require traditional arrays/backup for the next 5-10 years. Storage is the modern equivalent of a garbage dump that the world has yet to come to grips with. There is so much low value data that is used for a week/month and never used again. No-one wants to throw anything away and we need to mainstream processes to auto prioritize, tag and auto tier data. Data growth is 30% compounded yearly and the storage manufactures THINK they can keep up.

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