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back to article Android approaches 80% smartphone share as Apple's iPhone grows old

Apple's lack of revisions to its iPhone product line has cost it market share and Android now has 79.3 per cent of the worldwide market, according to the latest shipment data from IDC, with over 187 million Android handsets shipped in the second quarter of 2013. "The iOS decline in the second quarter aligns with the cyclicality …

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hmm

>BlackBerry had a terrible quarter, shipping 6.8 million units of its very new product line and seeing its share slip under 3 per cent, compared to 3.7 per cent for Windows Phone 8.

Wow if BlackBerry's upper management truly gave a shit about the shareholders they would liquidate the company now and return the billions they have in the bank as dividends. But of course they would rather cash out big salaries and bonuses to themselves before the whole shithouse goes up in flames and collapses.

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Meh

Re: hmm

Sad thing is, their new phones and os are really nice. My wife got a new Q10 for work, the keyboard is excellent as always, the screen is beautiful and finally there's a decent browser on it. It's the best phone for businesses that require lots of emailing (and emails without typos).

The problem is that the Z10 and Q10 are 2 years too late.

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Re: hmm

Are you Michael Dell?

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Meh

Instead

Instead of looking at it as Android v Apple v Blackberry v Windows it should be broken down into Manufacturer v Manufacturer v Manufacturer v Manufacturer.

Comparing manufacturers is more relevant economically than comparing OS's as a manufacturer may go bust but an operating system won't.

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Trollface

Re: Instead

What if you worked for El Reg and you REALLY wanted to talk about the OS rather than the hardware ?

Sorry, what was the point ?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: hmm

They need better marketing.

Windows Phone has failed massively, yet it gets spun into a positive by the media (3% marketshare based on shipments, with a massively stuffed retail chain is where Microsoft have always been), when blackberry fail just as badly, it's a negative...

In the real world, Windows Phone or the latest Blackberry handsets are owned by no more than 1% of the population, The stuffed retail chain holds the remainder.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Instead

Exactly - it's like comparing goals scored by Man United vs goals scored by every other team in the UK or world. Also 'Without a new product launch' pretty much explains it - few would buy a new iPhone 5 'now' as they are anticipating a new 5S - probably within weeks.

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LPF

Re: Instead

This, well done sir for being one of the few people to spot why this research analysis is utter bollocks

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Devil

Re: Instead

Not quite - from a devs viewpoint - "Which one are you going to write for?" 80% of the market or something smaller?

Nothing against apple, I have an aging ipod touch that's still in use, but I far prefer my Samsung 'droid.

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Re: Instead

Yeah but if say 70% of the Android market is "landfill" then the logic would be that many of those users would not be looking to spend money on apps as their disposable income would be less. Also many may not even know what an "app" is and have just ended up with an Android phone as they needed a mobile and that's what was on sale that day.

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Does that mean we should talk about all the manufacturers of Windows and Linux desktop and laptop devices as separate entities when comparing their share to OSX also?

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Re: Instead

I would write for the one that makes me the most money and gives me the least support headaches. I.E Not Android.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: hmm

" the real world, Windows Phone or the latest Blackberry handsets are owned by no more than 1% of the population, The stuffed retail chain holds the remainder."

Im proud to think different. (and I wouldn't own an iFolly).

If we were all the same, life would be very dull.

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Anonymous Coward

Same old rubbish

"Yeah but if say 70% of the Android market is "landfill" then the logic would be that many of those users would not be looking to spend money on apps as their disposable income would be less. Also many may not even know what an "app" is and have just ended up with an Android phone as they needed a mobile and that's what was on sale that day."

have i woken up in 2007?

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The problem is that the Z10 and Q10 are 2 years too late.

So was Windows phone. But (sadly) that is recovering, so why won't BB?

There are lots of parallels between Nokia and BB.

They were both big and lost share.

They both replaced their smartphone system with one missing features. (Both systems needed something done, I think BB needed to replace theirs, Nokia didn't, another overhaul would have done the job.)

They both alienated users with their new system. (By replacing it for Nokia, by being too bloody slow for BB)

They both let down adopters of the new hardware with system upgrades. (WP7 phones not going to 8, playbook not getting the new system)

The new systems both weren't a good fit as a replacement for the old one. (WP is more like iOS, Symbian is more like Android with the app store system. The new BB drops BIS and BES won't work without upgraded servers, so is more likely to appeal to ex symbian users than ex BB users.)

So if BB brazen it out like Nokia did, they may regain enough market to survive, even if it's not at the same level as they were at.

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Happy

Re: hmm

Physical keyboards.... *sigh. How will they discover Swype(trace input) like deliciousness with them? I'm a total convert to sywpe and hence will continue to fondle my android finger love slab. Give it a try you might like it!

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Re: hmm

Gave it two (Desire, A500), dropped it, disabled it on the Win8 units and see this as a reason to sell the Note 2 (can't disable fingerprint gathering)

Thankfully the Atom-based Win8 unit replacing it will not accept smeargestures and the bloodstains from Joe Stupid who tries it on my unit wash of easily from corning glass

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LPF

Re: Instead

As a developer I'm going to write for the part of the market that will buy my stuff! Seeing as Apple makes more moeny on its software than all the rest put together, I would vote for Apple

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Holmes

Re: Instead

"Which one are you going to write for? 80% of the market or something smaller?"

Actually, I'd go for the one with the lowest levels of piracy: http://www.occasionalgamer.com/2013/08/06/download-numbers-and-piracy/

Thankfully, Monogame makes porting cross-platform a breeze.

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Re: hmm

It doesn't matter how good they make an individual Blackberry or Windows phone device, it's not going to suddenly catapult them to 10-20% market share, I see the same fault in reasoning when people look at the HTC one and wonder why HTC haven't suddenly replaced Samsung as the dominant Android manufacturer simply because they have the "best" current flagship handset.

It'll take years of them releasing consistently good designs if they want to become an equal competitor to Android or iOS in market share terms and even if they do that there's no guarantee.

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Re: Instead

"Instead of looking at it as Android v Apple v Blackberry v Windows it should be broken down into Manufacturer v Manufacturer v Manufacturer v Manufacturer."

I see it the opposite way. Manufacturers may come and go, but the platform is the important part. That's where the developers and (unfortunately) advertisers are going to look.

If I had to guess, I'd say you're an Apple fan and would rather see Apple's much-higher market share vs. manufacturers. Don't worry, next quarter the 5S will be out and IOS will tick up for awhile.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Instead

"Comparing manufacturers is more relevant economically than comparing OS's as a manufacturer may go bust but an operating system won't."

But if the manufacturer produces the OS, then if the manufacturer went bust, so did the OS.

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Alert

Re: Instead

There's much more money in iOS development than in Android. Every developer will tell you the same story, iOS will account to 60-80% revenue with your app.

As long as users do not buy my apps I don't care how many Android devices are sold/shipped/activated.

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"well-positioned to re-capture market share"

It may (?) be true that it's "well-positioned" but coming from behind and trying to recapture lost market share is hardly a good position, is it?

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Pint

Re: "well-positioned to re-capture market share"

> coming from behind [...] is hardly a good position, is it?

I find that statement entirely debatable.

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Re: "well-positioned to re-capture market share"

Hmmm... So says a commenter named "ElReg!comments!Pierre". Your first name wouldn't be "Lucky", by any chance?

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IJC

What is news here?

Hmm, why does "shipments don’t necessarily equal sales" only apply to Windows Phone 8 devices?

And why should it be surprising that Windows Phone 8 is the fastest growing phone OS? Now that Nokia has got a full range of devices to market, including entry level phones like the 520, there was always going to be a jump upwards from the very low base. Seeing the absolute numbers would give another perspective on that. Nokia has always delivered good phones and has a loyal following of people who care more that the phone is a Nokia than what the OS happens to be.

Looks like Blackberry is destined to become a mobile apps and services provider. Compared to its competitors it just doesn't have the cash, especially with Microsoft's billions backing Nokia for the 3rd spot. I wouldn't be surpirsed to see them snapped up soo, especially if the share price declines significantly below $10.

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Saling ships

The reason Nokia got harsh comments before was articles put Nokia's 'shipped' figures next to competitors' 'sold' figures. This time, all the numbers are 'shipped', so they are equally suspect. Androids and iPhones sell, so the sold figures will catch up with the shipped. Nokia's previous unsold stock, return rates and attempts at comparing pears and grapefruit make me wonder 'shipped there, back and somewhere else' counts three times.

I am sure Nokia sales really are up, but at prices even further below cost. I wouldn't bet on Microsoft's billions bailing Nokia again. This time Nokia will mortgage Nokia Siemens Networks up to the neck and call it phone revenue just like the sale of the head office in Espoo.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: What is news here?

Because it's only Windows Phone that has a massively stuffed retail chain which includes (very) slow boats from China.

If you worked in the sector you would know how bad things are for Windows Phone. It's much worse than the 3% marketshare implies. Stockrooms are overflowing with unsold Lumias, shops can't give them away, sales staff won't sell them, as they know it will be a returned item the next week, when the owner discovers it's not Android and it doesn't have any apps.

Whilst certain people at El-Reg like to talk about Landfill Android, the reality is, Windows Phone is the real Landfill, and not just at the entry level, but the mid level too.

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Re: What is news here?

Growth figures (like all statistics) are either useless or lies designed to cover an uncomfortable truth.

If I release a product tomorrow and it sells just 1 unit, that's unlimited growth.

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Re: What is news here?

'Nokia ...... has a loyal following of people who care more that the phone is a Nokia than what the OS happens to be'

That, my friend, is a statement of purest utter bollocks!

I know plenty of people who having been unquestioningly loyal Nokia customers for a decade or more stopped buying Nokia phones because of the change to WP - most of them would buy a Nokia again without a second thought if they could get a better OS, be it 'Droid or whatever - pinching customers back from Sammy would be like take candy off a baby.

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Re: What is news here?

Ah, someone in the industry saying WP doesn't have any apps?

Anyway, 2010 was a busy time so I won't keep you.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: What is news here?

I do work in the sector, which is why I can call bull$h1t on your statement.....

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"mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

The bulk of the growth in smartphones these days are very low cost (the so-called "landfill Android") phones that are replacing all but the cheapest feature phones.

iPhone sales are still growing, albeit much more slowly than they were a few years ago, and thus so is their share of the overall number of cell phones sold.

The fact is, however, that most people who want a high end smartphone and can afford a high end smartphone already own one, so other than people who become wealthy enough (or reprioritize their spending habits) there are not nearly as many first time buyers of high end smartphones.

Just to save people the trouble, Apple's mobile market share is about 9% or so. So you can pretty much assume that Apple's smartphone market share will eventually decline to about 10% by the time there are no feature phones left. Hopefully we won't have to keep reading articles about smartphone market share once 90% of phones sold are smartphones...

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Stop

Re: "mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

Come again?

"mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

What the hell does that even mean? Or you just copied this from an Apple shareholder meeting slide?

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Coat

Re: "mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

Bit like comparing sales of Mercedes or BMW with those of Skoda. They all sell cars, but BMW and Mercedes aren't in the same market as Skoda.

The market has split from phone vs feature phone. There's now a luxury goods segment.

I've never owned an Apple or Android phone. I do have a nice new Mercedes though ;)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

Well it's more like comparing sales of BMW to sales of ALL other car manufacturers.

Apple vs Samsung would be a bit like comparing BMW to Ford.

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Re: "mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

"Bit like comparing sales of Mercedes or BMW with those of Skoda. They all sell cars, but BMW and Mercedes aren't in the same market as Skoda."

True - Škoda are better :-)

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Happy

Re: "mobile market share" matters, "smartphone market share" does NOT

I wouldn't compare Samsung to ford more Trabant, they're not the best build quality and have poor menu logic, reminds me of Amstrad, cheap and cheerful.

Just to clarify this is not a pro-apple or anti-android post, just a "Samsung, they're a bit crap aren't they?" post

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Paris Hilton

"iOS decline in the second quarter aligns with the cyclicality of iPhone"

Just keep saying that, you might start believing it and feel better.

Paris, she's already a believer.

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Re: "... the cyclicality ..."

Oh ...... my .....god!

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Re: "iOS decline in the second quarter aligns with the cyclicality of iPhone"

"Just keep saying that, you might start believing it and feel better."

Actually, it just needs translating from Marketeerian into English. It (probably, I think) means something like "[We believe] the majority of iPhone contracts expire in the period after each launch, so that's when we expect the most new units to be sold, with a gradual decline over the course of the year."

That interpretation is also more or less consistent with this quote from the article:

""Without a new product launch since the debut of the iPhone 5 nearly a year ago, Apple's market share was vulnerable to product launches from the competition. But with a new iPhone and revamped iOS coming out later this year, Apple is well-positioned to re-capture market share."

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Coat

Re: "... the cyclicality ..."

cycleness perhaps ?

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Facepalm

Re: "iOS decline in the second quarter aligns with the cyclicality of iPhone"

Except most contracts are 24 months in the UK, at least, these days

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Re: "iOS decline in the second quarter aligns with the cyclicality of iPhone"

While it's a factor, it doesn't change the overall crux of my interpretation, because some of those two year contracts will be coming to an end, having commenced with the launch before last.

It's not an absolute, anyway, just an interpretation of the nonsense-speak, that allows it to make some kind of sense.

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Boffin

Re: "... the cyclicality ..."

Cyclosity.

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"As usual, Linux phones managed to scrape a percentage point of market share"

Eh? "Android now has 79.3 per cent of the worldwide market", you write.

That's a "scraping a percentage share"? How do you figure?

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Linux

Re: "As usual, Linux phones managed to scrape a percentage point of market share"

Illustrates how well the Android camp has managed to hide the fact that Android is really Linux inside. Of course the UI is entirely different from what the desktop Linux distributions use, but the same is also true of all other Linux-based mobile phones.

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