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back to article Boffins DREAMING of a WHITE CHRISTMAS ... on MARS!

Brown University boffins reckon that some Martian valleys could have been carved by snowfall - rather than rivers running across the Red Planet's surface. Water-carved valleys on Mars appear to have been caused by runoff from precipitation Not a weird cheese, but evidence of Martian valleys being carved by rainfall runoff …

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The same phenomena that caused Earth's Younger Dryas Event caused a one time water flow on Mars. That Vallis Marinaris was carved from water is buggered "Face on Mars" logic. The more detailed we get the pictures, the more inexplicable the geology of Mars becomes. The surface of the planet is young, its scarrings recent, its regolith sharp edged, not the detritus of billions of years of gradualist evolution UV degradation and abrading dust storms. www.thunderbolts.info.

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I blame the government

It's a cover-up, almost certainly not natural causes but probably Xenu's base from when Mars and Earth were on the same tectonoic plate before mars split off to become a separate planet.

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Stop

Thunderbolts Project... Arrrgh.

I checked out that site, a little. It is always a good indicator that something is terribly amiss when 'you don't need a degree in astrophysics to understand it. Our DVD's and training materials explain it for you'...

Good for you for expanding your horizons a little, but don't get sucked into 'easy explanations' to issues that the astrophysics themselves don't understand but are, somehow, laid out by some dude on a DVD.

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Re: Thunderbolts Project... Arrrgh.

I've just checked it out too. All I can say is "damn" ...

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Facepalm

> The surface of the planet is young

Written in all seriousness underneath an article with a surface picture showing more unerased pustules than the face of a teenager running on fast carbs.

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Re: "> The surface of the planet is young"

Yeah, probably thinks Mars is "only" 2,500 years old.

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No Lightening Then???

if you have clouds and water you have lightening, so there should be some glass created like there is on earth.

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Headmaster

Re: No Lightening Then???

It has rained many a time on Earth without the presence of lightning; same as well for snow fall.

Also, "lightening" is making something less dark or reducing its weight. Lightning is that which Mighty Zeus lets forth from the heavens and/or YHWH uses to smite the wicked. (Or so I am told.)

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Bzzzztt..zzttt

Well, currently you just gonna have to crack up:

http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2005/10aug_crackling/

On the Moon and on Mars, conditions are ideal for triboelectric charging. The soil is drier than desert sand on Earth. That makes it an excellent electrical insulator. Moreover, the soil and most materials used in spacesuits and spacecraft (e.g., aluminized mylar, neoprene-coated nylon, Dacron, urethane-coated nylon, tricot, and stainless steel) are completely unlike each other. When astronauts walk or rovers roll across the ground, their boots or wheels gather electrons as they rub through the gravel and dust. Because the soil is insulating, providing no path to ground, a space suit or rover can build up tremendous triboelectric charge, whose magnitude is yet unknown. And when the astronaut or vehicle gets back to base and touches metal--ZAP! The lights in the base may go out, or worse.

Physicist Joseph Kolecki and colleagues at NASA Glenn first noticed this problem in the late 1990s before Mars Pathfinder was launched. "When we ran a prototype wheel of the Sojourner rover over simulated Martian dust in a simulated Martian atmosphere, we found it charged up to hundreds of volts," he recalls.

That discovery so concerned the scientists that they modified Pathfinder's rover design, adding needles half an inch long, made of ultrathin (0.0001-inch diameter) tungsten wire sharpened to a point, at the base of antennas. The needles would allow any electric charge that built up on the rover to bleed off into the thin Martian atmosphere, "like a miniature lightning rod operating in reverse," explains Carlos Calle, lead scientist at NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Similar protective needles were also installed on the Spirit and Opportunity rovers.

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Anonymous Coward

Meh...

... I'm dreaming of a Mars Ice-cream

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At one time, Mars had water and an atmosphere. No one knows where it went.

Earth has water, and an atmosphere, nobody knows where it came from. Theory is a comet.

Earth has a satellite, aka, moon, that was formed from the Planet Earth.

It was formed when a supposed object the size if "Mars" struck the planet Earth.

I've often wondered if Mars actually was the culprit, and most of the atmosphere was left on Earth after the collision. The Earth now has an atmosphere and a moon. Mars looses most of it's atmosphere to Earth, the rest is leached away as orbits settle.

Assume the "assumed" times of moon creation and Mars becoming a dead planet wrong for a second....

I wonder if we probed Phobos and Deimos if we would find their composition to be the same as that of Earth, the moon, Mars, or something else......

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Facepalm

I have often wondered if some weird-ass pseudo-sciency rife-with-totally-unwarranted-speculation-worthy-of-a-six-year-old site is linking to El Reg....

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Facepalm

Earth has water, and an atmosphere, nobody knows where it came from.

Actually, we do have a fairly good idea where Earth's atmosphere came from – and it has seldom anything to do with comets.

But where do farted-up crackpot theories come from?

Now that's a mystery we're still far from solving!

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Boffin

Origin of _water_ on Earth

Xperrsonie, if you're going to say "crackpot theory" it's important to not look extremely silly by not being able to parse simple sentences and read Wikipedia...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Origin_of_water_on_Earth

Of course we can discuss now if the sentence:

Earth has water, and an atmosphere, nobody knows where it came from.

...is correctly constructed since the meaning of "it" remains ambiguous. But even the article which X supplied at least links the second stage of atmosphere evolution to "the late heavy bombardment of Earth by huge asteroids".

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Mushroom

Re: Origin of _water_ on Earth

Xperrsonie, if you're going to say "crackpot theory" it's important to not look extremely silly by not being able to parse simple sentences and read Wikipedia...

This from the person who apparently had a seizure as he tried to write my login name.

"the late heavy bombardment of Earth by huge asteroids"

There are quite a few differences between "a comet" and "bombardment (...) by huge asteroids", but guess I shouldn't expect someone who bickers about the meaning of pronouns to notice.

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Pint

Mars as a shithole

Stanislaw Lem writes in "More Tales of Pirx The Pilot: Ananke":

Pirx cleaned his shaver by the window and stowed it back in its case, then cast another glance, now with undisguised antipathy, at the fabled Agathodaemon — at the mysterious “canal,” which turned out to be a boring, flat terrain framed by a blurry, rubble-strewn horizon. Compared with Mars, the Moon was positively homey. To someone who’s never left Earth, that might sound preposterous, but it’s the gospel truth. For one thing, the sun looked from the Moon just as it did from Earth—which can be appreciated only by someone not so much surprised as shocked to see it in the shape of a congealed, shriveled-up, faded fireball. And the lunar view of Earth—majestic, blue, lamplike, symbol of safe refuge, sign of domesticity, lighting the nights. Whereas the combined radiance of Phobos and Deimos was less than the Moon’s in its first quarter. And that lunar silence, the hush of deep space—no wonder it was easier to televise the first human step of the Apollo project than to transmit a similar spectacle from the Himalayas. The effects of an unremitting wind can be appreciated only on Mars.

....

He wasn’t in the mood for going out yet—the building was so very quiet. He was becoming more and more used to the solitude. A ship’s commander can always have his privacy on board; after a long flight (with Earth and Mars no longer in conjunction, the Mars trip took over three months), he practically had to force himself to mix with strangers. And except for the controller on duty, he knew no one here. Look in on him upstairs? That wouldn’t be too nice. Mustn’t hassle people on the job. He was judging by himself: he didn’t like intruders.

In his grip was a thermos with some leftover coffee, and a package of cookies. He ate, trying not to spill the crumbs, sipped his coffee, and stared out through the sand-scored port at the old, flat-bottomed, apathetic floor of Agathodaemon. That was the impression Mars made on him — that it didn’t care any more — which explained the haphazard accumulation of craters, so different from the Moon’s, looking more like washouts (“They look fake, doctored,” he once blurted out while browsing through some detailed blow-ups). The whimsicality of those wild formations that went by the name of “chaos” make them the pet sites of areologists: there was nothing like them on Earth. Mars seemed to have quit, not caring whether it kept its word, unconcerned with appearances. The closer one got to it, the more it lost its solid red exterior, the more it ceased to be the emblem of a war god, the more it revealed its drabness, spots, stains, its lack of any lunar or Earthlike contour: a gray-brown blight, rocked by eternal wind.

He felt a barely palpable vibration underfoot—a converter or a transformer. Otherwise, the same silence as before, penetrated, as if from another world, by the distant howl of a gale wind playing on the cosmodrome’s cables. That diabolical sand could eat through high-grade, five-centimeter steel cables. On the Moon you could leave anything, stow it in the rubble, and come back a hundred, a million years hence, secure in the knowledge that it would still be there. On Mars you couldn’t afford to drop anything, lest it sink forever. Mars had no manners.

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