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back to article For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the COUNTRY if you want to live

People often think that the big city is a dangerous place: they worry that they might get murdered, for instance. Being killed on purpose is more likely in town, according to new research, but it is so rare compared to dying in an accident of some type that in fact you would be much more likely to die unexpectedly in the …

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For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

I fixed that for you.

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Anonymous Coward

Haven't you watched

Midsummer Night Murders?

Of course it's more dangerous to live in the country.

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@AC Re: Haven't you watched

But that's only for one night of the year, so the daily average is not bad. Or did you mean 'Midsomer Murders'?

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Re: Haven't you watched

Beat me to it, damn 15 hour days. Would have said, "Avoid Midsomer, the murder rate is frightful."

However, they're all solved within an hour and a half.

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Re: Haven't you watched

And Cabot Cove

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Re: Haven't you watched

Considering the population and how long the shows been going on, I'm suprised there's anyone left in Midsomer.

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Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

Unless you live in a country that has, you know, incomparably worse living (and dying) conditions, like Russia or some other Soviet-area country... or most of Africa and middle-east. Probably Central and South America too!

In other words, a lot of people. I wonder how many of them read The Register though...

Oh well, back to my first-world problems.

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Holmes

@Wowfood - Re: Haven't you watched

Wrote :- "Considering the population and how long the shows been going on, I'm suprised there's anyone left in Midsomer."

It's got nothing on St Mary Mead, where huge numbers of Agatha Christies' murders took place. In fact "Midsomer" is meant to be a county, and St Mary Mead is just a village.

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Childcatcher

Re: Haven't you watched

Beat me to it, damn 15 hour days. Would have said, "Avoid Midsomer, the murder rate is frightful."

However, I would prefer to live there than in Stephen King's Castle Rock where one has demons and portals to the nether dimensions opening every five minutes spilling out all sorts of undesirable nasties.

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Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

This seems apropos: http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=3020

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Haven't you watched

I almost sounds by reading this article that the American belief that arming yourself will prevent crime. It sounds like if everyone has firearms, they are more likely to accidentally kill each other than prevent a crime!

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Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

Foolishness. The USA is perfectly safe as long as you don't breath the air, drink the water, eat the food, or leave the house*. Perfectly... safe!

* The USA is not responsible if you are killed in your home when it is destroyed by fire, tornado, hurricane, avalanche, flood, earthquake or is driven through by a vehicle or collided into by airplane, helicopter, or drone. The USA is also not responsible if you are killed in your home during a home invasion by armed criminals, home invasion by armed police, by shoddy construction techniques or by shoddy construction materials.

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Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

It's hardly invisible. It's lined with a huge fence and signs hung on it that read: "If you can read this, you're on the side that sucks."

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Devil

Re: Haven't you watched

Actually, you're safe on that score. Both Castle Rock and Sunnydale (you know, Hellmouth and all) were eventually destroyed. DO, however, avoid staying at the Overlook Hotel in any case.

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Big Brother

Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

Aoyagi Aichou 10:36 - Actually I lived in the states for a while and I remember a report about government travel advisories that stated that the US was the most dangerous place to live outside of a declared war zone.

So Aoyagi Aichou all the paces you mentioned are not war zones and will actually be safer than the US.

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Re: Haven't you watched

Fortunately, that that belief is not required to live in America -- even if one is American.

Anyway, I'm a retired soldier and an engineer; I can think up more horrible ways to kill people if I want to.

Isn't it nice I DON'T?

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Re: Haven't you watched

@BongoJoe : Let's hope Cameron didn't read that, or next on the filter list will be everything related to Stephen King... after all, anything refering to "dimensiosn" which are "nether" MUST be about enlargements of the penile kind.

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@Dagg

And you trust travel advisories over those mentioned here? Funny. Nice use of The Onion logic there...

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Angel

Re: For pity's sake: DON'T MOVE to the USA if you want to live

Err...why do they have signs pointing inwards?

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So what's with the drugs? Or is that the "war on drugs" whereby you get killed by SWAT team raiding your home in the woods at six in the morning for fun and giggles?

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Elfin?

Sounds like they need a lot more health and safety inspectors, here, have ours, all of them, keep them a while...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Elfin?

Need some elves to deal with the army of "unintentional injury dwarfs"

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Re: Elfin?

Well, when I got to "the rate of unintentional injury dwarfs" I paused and wondered if there was a "to" missing. Then I carried on reading and the sentence made sense.

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Coat

Re: Elfin?

remember, six out of seven dwarves are not happy!!!!!

Mine's the leprachaun costume... keeping my head down.

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Paris Hilton

One thought...

Without reading the paper itself (I'm too lazy to do that right now), has the good Doctor taken into account that it is not only people living in rural areas that have crashes in rural areas? City folk do travel to rural areas occasionally (family visits, holidays, etc.). Since its well known that more crashes and deaths occur on the roads on holiday weekends (when city folk are also travelling the rural roads), has the doctor seperated that particular statistic out of his work?

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FAIL

Re: One thought...

indeed. flawed "research" from a so-called expert. The percentage of "country folk" having crashes is nothing like that quoted.

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Re: One thought...

Hard to crash a tractor. N'est-ce pas?

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Re: One thought...

It's no harder to crash a tractor than any other vehicle, but if you do crash it you are often less accessible than most cars are when crashed. You'll also find them quite uncomfortable to crash into when they're fitted with front loaders, fertiliser spreaders and the like. In fact, it's the the things bolted to or towed by tractors that seem to cause more grief. When a farmer was killed unjamming his muck-spreader while he was still leaning into it I did add a highlighted entry onto my list of ways that I'd rather not die.

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Re: One thought...

"Hard to crash a tractor. N'est-ce pas?" Pas de tout, they fall over

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How to survive in the countryside

32% of fatal car accidents involve alcohol; 31% of fatal wrecks involve speeding; 31% involve not using a seat belt.

Moral of the story? Slow down, don't drink and drive, and put on your seat belt, and your chances of living until the completion of your drive will increase tremendously. Even in the countryside.

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Happy

Re: How to survive in the countryside

Yes but D.U.I is simply not considered an issue in the states. Last year when over there I went out with some locals one night, and we got totally blattered. I was the only one who ordered a taxi home. And the other lads and lassies all drove their own cars home and they had more to drink than I did.

When I mentioned a taxi as a good alternative, they said, "No, were used to drinking and driving, you're not, so that's why you need the cab".

WTF

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

its not purely speed that kills, its inappropriate speed for the conditions and inability to control a vehicle at speed that can kill. city folk drive too fast in rural areas. people need to LEARN to drive! the driving test only checks competance at low speed manouvres and some general knowledge of road rules

city kids are streetwise, country kids are countrywise - that becomes engrained in your nature and its hard to change! especially if you have a basic lack of understanding of the dangers around you

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Joke

Re: How to survive in the countryside

Of course I prefer Lee Mack's ideas about drinking and driving:

NSFW!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moUChycJzIc

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

Andy. While I don't disagree with your conclusions that it's best not to drink & drive, speed or ride without a seatbelt, I do see this as on of the ways statistics can be manipulated to make a point. Simply adding together the stats you quote could lead to the believe that 94% of fatal accidents (32 + 31 + 31) involve drink, excessive speed and no seatbelt use, a pretty high figure! However, unless there is some sanitising going on that you haven't told us about, many of those accidents could involve drink AND speed AND lack of seatbelts (a seemingly likely combination) which will skew the results. In the extreme, if ALL the accidents involved all three then the results would be more like: 32% of fatal car accidents involve alcohol, excessive speed and lack of seat belts, or, less impressively, 68% of fatal car accidents do NOT involve alcohol, excessive speed and lack of seat belts.

Again, not disagreeing with the principle, just pushing a little against the whole "Lies, damn lies and statistics" thing.

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DJO
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Joke

Statistics for fun and profit.

"32% of fatal car accidents involve alcohol"

So 68% of fatal car accidents involve sober drivers therefore it statistically more than twice as dangerous to drive sober than drunk.

Pass me the tequila.

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Stop

Re: How to survive in the countryside

I have a friend who lives in rural South Carolina

When she drives she always has a booze drink in her cup holder

Usually a pint & a half off White Russian, with hardly any milk in it!

Scary

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Coat

Re: How to survive in the countryside

"its not purely speed that kills..."

It's not speed that kills AT ALL

It's the sudden deceleration...

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Re: Slow down

Surely slowing down would just result in more, if less sever, accident.

People driving slowly are bored

Bored people don't concentrate

People not concentrating on the road while driving are the cause of 99.9% of all accidents.

Therefore driving slowly is a cause of accidents.

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

"It's the sudden deceleration..."

I'd like to know how a pedestrian walking at 3mph can die from suddenly decelerating.

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Boffin

Re: How to survive in the countryside

"I'd like to know how a pedestrian walking at 3mph can die from suddenly decelerating."

Unlikely - but possibly from decelerating from 3mph to 0mph when walking into a brick wall or similar, and the skull takes most of the impact. However, any motorist/motorcyclist travelling at say 50mph faces a rapid deceleration, whether or not they hit a tree or another vehicle or whatever.

This can have a somewhat deleterious effect upon human liveware...

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

> "It's the sudden deceleration..."

I'd like to know how a pedestrian walking at 3mph can die from suddenly decelerating.

Deceleration is just acceleration in the opposite direction and so the effect is the same, the problem the pedestrian dies from is parts of their anatomy suffering extreme acceleration.

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Re: Slow down

Completely agree.

In fact if I'm on a long boring drive, I tend to speed up until it gets exciting enough to keep me WIDE awake.

Anyway, speed doesn't kill people, _speed_difference_ is what kills people. Whether it's the difference between you and a static lump of concrete, or between you and the idiot doing 50mph down the middle lane of a fast flowing motorway.

There are some usually arbitrary numbers-onna-stick as well, but they don't really count for anything safety-wise, as long as you are doing roughly what everyone else is doing.

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Re: D.U.I is simply not considered an issue in the states.

Right, complete non-issue that why we have MADD and insanely low blood alcohol levels for DUI now.

Yeah, I lived with someone for a while who thought nothing of drinking and driving. He was a twit. Just like your friends. The friends I hang out with don't drink and drive. If there's a party with alcohol the people drinking are likely to be crashing at the host's domicile or riding back to a hotel with friends.

You need to choose your friends more carefully. Might I suggest staying away from the idiots in cities and getting to know some folks in the suburbs?

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@nevstah

Good points, but having grown up in a rural area and moved to the city, I'm willing to bet the so-called brain boffin didn't bother to properly analyze his data. In either location I'd rather be driving with people who learned to drive in the rural America than the line crowding, tailgating, non-signaling when changing lanes morons from the city. I'd put up a paycheck that at least half of those rural accidents were caused by city drivers.

Hell, it takes me a week to decompress and get back to good driving practices* when I visit my parents who still live where I grew up.

*in practice for where I live I found the following definitions to be true:

- Safe following distance is your front quarter panel placed at about the mid-point of the rear quarter panel of the car next to you

- Safe speed is 10 mph over the posted limit in patrolled areas, 15-20 in unpatrolled areas, dead in known locations for speed cameras.

- the first 3 seconds of a red light are optional, so be prepared when you get a green

- on divided highways with two lanes on either side, the passing lane is the safe travel lane

- never use a turn signal for a lane change, that's really a signal for the guy next to you to move to Safe Following distance as defined above

Oh, and rush hour accidents are just the randomizers for relocating the usual slowdowns.

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

Yes but D.U.I is simply not considered an issue in the states.

False. As an American I can assure you that most of us take drinking and driving quite seriously and would like to see offenders taken off the streets. In fact, we make a pretty decent effort to catch them and revoke their licenses.

Last year when over there I went out with some locals one night, and we got totally blattered. I was the only one who ordered a taxi home. And the other lads and lassies all drove their own cars home and they had more to drink than I did.

When I mentioned a taxi as a good alternative, they said, "No, were used to drinking and driving, you're not, so that's why you need the cab".

Don't judge our whole population on the actions of those type of idiots. You have your fair share of morons in the UK, we have ours in the US. Ours are just louder than yours.

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Re: How to survive in the countryside

Also, the three point advice given don't necessarily protect me when someone too drunk to fasten their seatbelts speeds into my car. Driving under the influence and driving too fast are a danger to everyone on the road, not just the participants.

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Flame

Re: How to survive in the countryside

> Also, the three point advice given don't necessarily protect me when someone too drunk to fasten their seatbelts speeds into my car.

Untrue. That 3 point advice will likely be the difference between you living and you dying.

We're not nearly as helpless as some people like to think.

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