Feeds

back to article Samsung Galaxy S3 explodes, turns young woman into 'burnt pig'

A young Swiss woman reportedly received second and third degree burns when her Samsung Galaxy S3 smartphone exploded in her trousers. According to a report in the French-language Le Matin of Lausanne, Switzerland, 18-year-old Fanny Schlatter was on her job as an apprentice painter, loading paint cans into her boss' truck, when …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Silver badge
Meh

'Fanny Schlatter', you just couldn't make a name like that up could you!

Her boss wasn't by any chance a Brazilian was he?

12
4
Silver badge
Holmes

Sounds standard Swiss to me.

3
0
Coat

Galaxy S3 - The Samsung equivalent of Jersey Shore

@LarsG - If she really looks like a burnt pig she'll be changing her name to Snooki ..

4
0
PJI
Bronze badge
FAIL

You must be American, so sweet. In English, Fanny is short for a couple of names, including Myfanwy, not uncommon at one time and no snigger value in that context, also not in Swiss, as opposed to Randy, for example, that is popular in American but has considerable snigger value in UK.

Schatter is fairly standard, again snigger value only to Yanks. Really, you are culturally ignorant. Get over it and get educated. I assume you are a little older than three years old.

17
24
Bronze badge

Around here (Aus), Myfanwy is usually shortened to "Myfy" or "Miffy" - to avoid the snigger value of shortening it to "Fanny".

Personally, I'm happy that this beautiful name seems to be having a slight resurgence here - I know several Myfanwys, all in their late teens/early 20s.

2
0
Coat

eh .. eh .. he said ..

snigger .. eh .. eh ..

Randy has the same connotation in the USA .. is Schatter even a word ? .. never heard it ..

Thanks for sharing about Fanny though .. you need a degree in the UK to know such things ?

checking the coat to be sure my S3's not hot

0
0
Bronze badge

How cute PJI you must be one of those brits that think all Americans are dumb while assume slang in the UK means the same in the US. Every hear of fannie mae. Most American would associate the word Fanny with the people that help screw over the economy by encouraging bad loans.

It would be more likely that LarsG is from the UK and not America as Fanny just does not mean the same thing in America.

4
3
Anonymous Coward

Fannie != Fanny.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

"Fanny is short for a couple of names" - most notably 'cunt' of course.

15
2
Anonymous Coward

Epic fail...

Sorry PJI, but you're displaying your own cultural ignorance there. "Fanny" in Septic English means "bum" in English - as in "fanny pack". No Merkin would therefore snigger at it in the same way as the OP (with the "Brazilian" reference). It's much more sniggerworthy in English English. Normally they say if a joke has to be explained, it's not funny, but in this case it appears to be because you've had a sense of humour bypass. Yes, it's juvenile, puerile even, but I love the way you're typo ("Schatter") makes it funnier.

7
2
Headmaster

Re: "Fanny means bum in English"

You mean Americanese, a language originally based on English, but which deviated over the centuries into something roughly comparable to a monosyllabic Neanderthal grunt.

9
3
Anonymous Coward

Re: "Fanny means bum in English"

No, I meant the English translation of the Merkin word "fanny" is "bum". Which I could've put more clearly.

0
0
Silver badge
Headmaster

Re: "Fanny means bum in English"

You mean Americanese, a language originally based on English, but which deviated over the centuries into something roughly comparable to a monosyllabic Neanderthal grunt.

Actually Americanese is much closer to 18th century English than the English spoken in the UK, thanks mostly to the proliferation of dictation teachers in England in the 19th century who rather radically changed the way Brits speak by pushing their version of 'correct' English (which didn't actually exist in real usage when the US first became the US).

4
0
Silver badge

@PJI

bit heavy on the snobbery, don't you think ?

5
0
Bronze badge

Re: @PJI - bit heavy on the snobbery, don't you think ?

front bottom!

1
0
Bronze badge

Close enough that most people would not get the distinction in America.

0
0
Happy

@LarsG

'Fanny Schlatter', you just couldn't make a name like that up could you!

Not as good as Fanny Chmelar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmwGFX5pgXw

0
0
Headmaster

Re: "Americanese closer to real English"

Yo bro, don be dissin my say, cos I 86 yo mofo ass!

Hmm, is that really how 18th century Englishmen spoke?

Although, as unintelligible as that gibberish is, it pales in comparison to Mercan Marketese, which has the irritating habit of omitting both the indefinite article and plural, a linguistic device defined (by Mercans, naturally) as "zero-marking". E.g. "we give value", "we have good product" - presumably as a religious mark of reverence for all things pertaining to money.

As a side note: Isn't it amazing where discussing fannies will lead you?

2
0
Headmaster

Re: "Fanny means bum in English"

And, confusingly, the Americanese "bum" means "tramp" (as in a homeless person, not a loose woman) in English. There's also this thing called a "bum rap", the meaning of which I must admit completely eludes me, although if I had to guess then I'd say it was a form of music involving drumsticks and a brave volunteer's posterior.

About the only thing Americanese has in common with English these days is its alphabet, and even then I'd imagine Mercans resent having a whole 26 letters when a few vowels would serve them just as well, or possibly a few choice hieroglyphs (gun, gangsta, sex, money, nyancat, etc.).

1
1

You owe me a new keyboard matey boy!

Note to self - DO NOT DRINK WHILST READING COMMENTS ON EL REG!

0
0

Re: "Fanny means bum in English"

I never heard the gleuteous maximus being referred to as a "bum" until I started reading stuff from GB. It was always "butt" "or "ass". And, from what I've been told, "fanny" is a slang term for the vulva.

and a "bum rap" usually referred to a trumped up charge to harass someone, such as a charge a LEO would use to run a "bum" (beggar, bindlestiff etc) in, such as the charge in my lovely home that if you do not have $5 in your wallet, or a credit/debit card, you can be arrested as a vagrant

0
0

Actually the Devil made up her name to tempt us from the paths of political correctness - get thee behind me!

4
0
Silver badge
Happy

Sweater?

Who wears a sweater when they are painting? The phone probably committed suicide because of the gross disregard for trade professional attire protocol.

I am glad she didn't catch on fire completely though or that she didn't light off the paint.

0
13
FAIL

Re: Sweater?

She wasn't painting.

5
1
Silver badge

Re: Sweater?

"Fanny Schlatter was on her job as an apprentice painter, loading paint cans into her boss' truck, when her smartphone exploded in her trousers."

So you didn't read the article. Good show.

3
11
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Sweater?

She was loading paint cans NOT painting, can you even read your own quote? As an apprentice she gets all the crap jobs and probably doesnt do much painting. I imagine the sweater was old so she didnt care if it got trashed etc.

6
1
Silver badge

Cochon brûlé

I can't think of many things as bad as burnt Fanny..

Sorry, but that just had to to be said......

6
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Cochon brûlé

Her Beef Curtains were medium well done?

2
0
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: Cochon brûlé

Oh please, I need someone to get that image out of my mind.

0
0
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: Cochon brûlé

Well done "long-pig"! The Caribbean indians called Europeans long-pig based on taste (canabalistic). Same smell you get when people die in fires.

In any event poor Fanny's bandages go all the way up to her fanny whether it be the English or American translation.

0
0

And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

Apple are significant...

0
35
Silver badge
WTF?

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

Apple is a significant significant company, yes. However the iPhone has had its share of melting/exploding batteries. Go back and read the article for relevant links.

10
2
Silver badge

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

This is a risk with all lithium-ion batteries; Apple uses the same chemistry as everyone else.

Assuming external chargers are available then technically this is a reason to pick the Samsung over the Apple — the S3 (and indeed the S4) both have removable batteries so you could keep the phone next to your bed in case of emergencies on one battery while your other charges in some other part of the house. Charging tends to heat batteries so therefore is an occasion when the risk of combustion very slightly increases.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

I don't bu iPhones and I'll thank you not to imply otherwise.

24
2
PJI
Bronze badge

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

Charging? It was in her pocket, while she was carrying paint from one place to another. Tell us about this charger, could be useful.

1
0
Bronze badge
Coat

"Apple uses the same chemistry as everyone else."

But their molecules have rounded corners.

29
2
Trollface

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

This is THE scenario in which Apple were the true innovators... wonder when they'll sure for patent infringement on this 'feature'...

1
0
Silver badge
Devil

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

Quote: Charging tends to heat batteries so therefore is an occasion when the risk of combustion very slightly increases.

Err... All well designed lithium batteries have a thermal control on the charging circuit. In fact for some applications they _HAVE_ to have one. In any case, this one exploded not while being charged so this is not likely to have anything to do with charging.

1
0

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

Err... there are hundreds of travel chargers... I have one for exactly the situation when I'm using the phone heavily (screen always on + GPS, for instance) on the go.

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: And THIS is why you bu an iPhone.

iPhones are made using exactly the same battery tech as every other manufacturer. There have been many cases of them blowing up, such as this one from last year:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/03/iphone_spontaneously_combusts_on_cctv/

You idiot.

2
1
Silver badge
Paris Hilton

Is it advisable to douse a rapidly decomposing lithium battery with water???

4
0
Silver badge
Boffin

Water is actually the best thing to use to extinguish a lithium battery fire as it is one of the only suppressants that cools the battery enough to inhibit the thermal runaway. After water, in order of effectivness : Halon, CO2, them wet foam.

The biggest risk with water is that of molten lithium and/or plastic splatter but it stops the fire. The others may halt the flames temporarily but unless the thermal runaway is controlled first it will burst into flames again in short order.

12
0
Mushroom

If you had a burning phone in your back pocket, wouldn't you drop your pants in an instant?

Rather than hop up and down with your mouth open till your boss comes over and walks you to a bathroom in a nearby store???

Think about how long it takes to walk into a store and into the bathroom, not to mention whatever time it took for your boss to become alerted and walk over to grab you?

What would she have done if her boss didn't come? Just stand there and wait till she was ready for dinner?

4
0
Silver badge
Trollface

BOFH FAIL

Should have gone with Halon.

1
0
Silver badge
Thumb Up

@Don Jefe

Good tip. Thanks for going against the norm and actually providing useful information in the comments section of a Reg article about phones.

2
0
Holmes

"Water is actually the best thing to use to extinguish a lithium battery fire as it is one of the only suppressants that cools the battery enough to inhibit the thermal runaway. After water, in order of effectivness : Halon, CO2, them wet foam."

Thanks for the useful info. To be pedantic, you should probably have said "lithium ion" rather than "lithium" although for batteries, the latter implies the former. You really don't want to pour water on pure lithium - that will actually cause an explosion, which I'm sure you know, but your target audience might not.

2
0
Silver badge

You really don't want to pour water on pure lithium - that will actually cause an explosion

That was one of my favorite days in chemistry class.

0
0
Bronze badge

To be even more pedantic you should have said lithium cobalt oxide.

0
0

Water is bad for dousing out an oil fire (say, your fried french), because being of lower density and of liquid disposition, such materials will rise up for continued breathing when faced with such attempts.

Water is good for dousing out quite a number of stuff actually. Even the firemen still use it.

1
0
Silver badge

Re: Nick De Plume

In addition, burning oil is often hotter than the boiling temperature of water, so putting water on an oil fire just spreads and atomises the burning oil. This can be fun if observed from a distance.

1
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.