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back to article FCC orders wireless carriers to protect customers' call info

The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has issued new rules that clarify how wireless telecom providers should protect their customers' call records and other information. "This sensitive information can include phone numbers that a customer has called and received calls from, the durations of calls, and the phone's …

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Anonymous Coward

Protecting customer information...

"The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has issued new rules that clarify how wireless telecom providers should protect their customers' call records and other information" ..."This sensitive information can include phone numbers that a customer has called and received calls from, the durations of calls, and the phone's location at the beginning and end of each call,"

And that would include protecting it from our very own Government or no?

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Meh

Privacy?

With all that is being reported, the USA has all but got cameras in every room of every house.

They preach privacy and human rights and at the same time they fcuk from behind.

It's all kept in storage until the day they use it against you....... And they will.

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Big Brother

Re: Privacy?

"the USA has all but got cameras in every room of every house" - It probably already has cameras in many rooms, what with laptops, smart phones and games consoles (think Xbox One) left 'always on' </shiver>.

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Re: Protecting customer information...

No. Not any more so than British users' metadata is protected from disclosure to government access under warrants, or Chinese or Russian users's data is protected from their government's access (under pretty much any circumstances whatever.

It may be time to remember that NSA's actiities were authorized under democratically passed laws and subject to a variety of judicial and internal controls intended to limit their scope. One of the main questions is whether the democratic excesses of the period immediately after the Al Qaida attack on New York City and Washington exceeded the bounds set by the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

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Re: Protecting customer information...

> It may be time to remember that NSA's actiities were authorized under democratically passed laws and subject to a variety of judicial and internal controls intended to limit their scope.

It may also be time to remember that their actions have always been ultra vires.

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WTF?

@Tom Dial

"One of the main questions is whether the democratic excesses of the period immediately after the Al Qaida attack on New York City and Washington exceeded the bounds set by the Constitution and Bill of Rights."

"democratic excesses"

That would be the Legislature passing THE PATRIOT Act without reading it first I take while shrub played the old "If you don't vote for this you're a terrorist" care?

"democratic excesses" I'll have to remember that one for the Book of Euphemisms.

I'd suggest the "excesses" were very far from being "democratic"

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Thumb Down

Re: Privacy?

Well i guess if you have a number of laptops in the house it'd be easy for them to use a backdoor to switch the built-in webcam on.

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Mushroom

And the other secret orders?

.......while secretly ordering them to share it but with a penalty only if they get caught. So we'll hear of no more spying on anybody by anybody through anybody....or else!

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Hypocrisy

What the US (and all their authorities, agencies, politicians and big companies) say and do really couldn't be more disjointed. And they don't even seem to be embarrassed when telling others about freedom, abiding by international law and other bullshit. That the FCC wants better protection so that others don't get to see the data they see, does hardly come as a surprise.

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Facepalm

Monitoring the Citizens

"the USA has all but got cameras in every room of every house"

No. I live in the US, and we don't. No, really, we don't. Not to say the the NSA might be able to turn on cameras and mikes on some computers sometimes, but they won't be spying on all of the USA in the near future . You Brits on the other hand, have, for the past 30 years or so, walked (or been led - with little resistance ???) down the path to where you ARE the most highly monitored nation on the planet! "They" ARE looking at you almost everywhere you go in the UK with face matching software, and you sheep are letting them enact even more invasive policies. We'll sit here in the USA with our guns (you gave yours up after WWII cause you were TOLD to), and control of the internet, and see how it goes with you and yours...

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Black Helicopters

Re: Monitoring the Citizens

Have a +1 for reminding the brits about the tragedy of cctv. However - it's a mistake to equate gun ownership with any sort of ability to prevent or influence US govt. control of your life. If they want you they will have you. No armed standoff in history has ever resulted in the govt. coming second. Not only do they have far more firepower, most Americans with guns have no idea how to use them under duress or stress.

What will protect our freedom is free and open communication and it is this that they are taking away. The people don't control the Internet, the govt does.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Monitoring the Citizens

Not true. The United States were *founded* on a stand-off where the government came second - the government being the British Empire. There are a few events in the United States' own history where the government lost a gun battle with US citizens as well. The Battle of Athens is a good example.

World-wide I can think of quite a few more examples of armed stand-offs where the government was beaten or capitulated. A few of them ended with revolution.

Never say never. :)

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Re: No armed standoff in history has ever resulted in the govt. coming second.

That's an odd thing for someone from the first country to suffer such a loss to be saying to someone in the country which dealt it that loss. But perhaps like many other Europeans who pride themselves on having more history than we do on this side of the pond, you have failed to avail yourself of studying that history.

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Meh

THIS WOMAN will never make FCC COMMISSIONER, ...

she is far too sensible for a government employee.

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carriers will still have to respond to such requests when legally ordered to do so.

And well they should.

The operative question is whether the legal orders are operative under a real theory of justice or just a fig leaf for a tyrant to impose his will.

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