Feeds

back to article Top Norks bone up on Hitler

Rotund nutjob communist dictator Kim Jong-un has been handing copies of Hitler's autobiography to his generals and ordering them to study it “in depth”, according to a North Korean dissident website. Although nominally banned in the ultra-hardline communist state, Mein Kampf is a firm favourite of the chubby megalomaniac - or so …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Silver badge
Trollface

Had some trouble parsing that sentence...

"a mockery of media whose basic mission is objectivity, impartiality and neutrality and an intolerable insult to human conscience"

Sounds like murdoch press. Except without the objectivity, impartiality and neutrality.

7
2
Silver badge
Facepalm

Re: Had some trouble parsing that sentence...

^Should say, "Except Murdoch press lacks the objectivity, etc". Can't wait till I can edit...

1
0

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Silver badge

Re: Had some trouble parsing that sentence...

Branching into politics now Eadon? Good to see you're sticking to the tone you use for comments about Microsoft; how else would we know it was you?

3
1
Bronze badge

Re: Had some trouble parsing that sentence...

You could look at the bit that says 'Eadon', at the top left of the comment. Bit of a give-away I know...

1
0
Bronze badge
Thumb Down

Nice try, Eadon.

I get most of my news from the BBC (primarily the Today programme), and find it to be very well balanced, grilling all of their interviewees, regardless of political colour.

The comedies tend to lean towards the Left, but that's inevitable when mocking those in authority, as those in authority tend to lean towards the Right.

"extreme left wing bias"? Pull the other one - it summons the train to the gulag.

2
0
Bronze badge
Happy

Re: Had some trouble parsing that sentence...

Be afraid western running dog capitalist scum! We can produce more perjoratives per paragraph (with no snark!) than you.

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: Nice try, Eadon.

My impression is that [The Now Show] and Ian Hislop favour the Conservatives - at least lately and some of the time and maybe as they get older. Apparently that comes to us all.

Also, Steve Punt and Hugh Dennis, probably on Now, once years and years ago did some very sharp sketches criticising those you-can't-really-afford-it-and-certainly-not-at-these-rates loan companies - but subsequently, individually, did adverts for just that sort of loan company. I think I remember one where Punt had used the loan money to buy a spiffing leather jacket that everyone said was the dog's b. - it was on the radio though so you couldn't actually tell that. Anyway, I'm sceptical of their principles. They sold out.

And the [Heresy] show doesn't mind endorsing the right-wing point of view, either.

And you know those old Jews that run Wonga dot com, one of them is played by Nicholas Parsons. Actually, I don't know if the cuddly doddery old puppet people are Jewish and I don't know if he is but if saying so makes you think twice before borrowing money at an APR over 1000 per cent interest then I am saying it. I'll say that they are in league with the Cybernauts. (Not the David Bowie impersonators, but, on second thoughts, go for it.) Anyway it's probably really just some twenty-five year old ruthless business kid with a solid gold sports car who sold his actual grandmother to an abattoir. For that matter, I'm assuming that Nicholas Parsons is voice-overing as Earl, who otherwise very weirdly never speaks - I do so mainly because I don't think you're supposed to think that, either. But I wonder if I should have gone straight here from [Heresy].

So there's something to think about in [Just a Minute]. But of course he did [Sale of the Century] as well so it isn't as though he's betraying a long held trust.

0
0

This post has been deleted by a moderator

Silver badge
Facepalm

Um...

While Nazi does mean "national socialism", it was in fact more like pirated Italian Fascism than actual socialism. In fact, their first targets were the Communists and the actual Socialists and Social-Democrats; the conservative oligarchs actually cheered for the Nazis because they would crush all attempts at socialism/communism. Of course, they were very, very wrong.

And well, I'd really doubt Kim Jong-un would worship the Third Reich, given that the Kim family fought the Axis powers in WW2. It would make as much sense as a Holocaust survivor worshipping Hitler: it would just not make sense, even by NORKS standards.

9
1
Silver badge

@Daniel B. Re: Um...

You've heard of sound bite politics. Eadon does writing bite intellect.

6
2
Bronze badge
WTF?

Yeah, right.

Calling you something does not mean you stick to the words.

The 'Socialist' posture was just a way to gain popularity in a time when many people were suffering from the economical crisis.

Hitler was not socialist at all, on the contrary he was sustained by the big business. Without the financial help of germany Konzerns, Hitler would not have been able to conquer Germany. The night of the Long Knives was the final proof NSDAP would be on the side of the big companies against any socialist attempt to change the social order.

9
1
Silver badge

Re: Um...

"Without wishing to sound in any way wacky"

I'm afraid that ship has sailed.

@Daniel B. Kim Jong-un admiring the Third Reich makes about as much sense as Dutch neo-Nazis, yet they exist. Besides, I've met people from the far East that don't know an awful lot about the Nazi's part in World War 2 since, to them, the main antagonist was Japan.

9
0
JC_
Bronze badge

@Daniel B.

It would make as much sense as a Holocaust survivor worshipping Hitler: it would just not make sense, even by NORKS standards

There are neo-Nazis in Poland, of all places, despite neo-Nazis despising Slavs and the small matter of 6 million Poles dying in WWII, so having them in NK seems believable.

Didn't Hitler (or his minions) once try to prove that the Japanese were something of a master race, too, simply because they were allies? The Norks probably wouldn't be fond of that theory.

1
0
Mushroom

@Eadon

"Given that the Nazi's were a socialist organisation (the very Nazi derives from "national socialist party") then this is not a great surprise."

As irritating as your comments usually are, you seem to be a reasonably intelligent bloke. Which makes your above comment worse by orders of magnitude, because I cannot attribute your comment to mere ignorance.

Your statement is not only an attempt to distort historical facts by parroting the propaganda of (predominantly American) ultra-rightwing nutjobs, but also an insult to all social democrats, socialists and members of the Communist party who were persecuted and killed by the NSDAP in the Third Reich.

They did not only put jews into concentration and labour camps. With comments like the one above, you and your ilk are trying to suggest that the persecution of communists, socialists, social democrats, and workers' organisations did not happen, or "it can't have been that bad, because the nazis were really socialists themselves, dontcha know..." . What your ultimate goal is I do not know, but you will not succeed.

6
0
Bronze badge

Nazi # socialist

Eadon, you must know that the German acronym for "nazi" is NSDAP (National Socialist German Worker's Party, in English). Sounds very 'left', but in fact it was very 'right'. They eliminated labour unions, murdered socialists and communists, and their policy for women was "kinder, kirch, kuchen" (children, church, kitchen)- sounds more Taliban than 'left'.

Do you know anything about history?

4
1
Silver badge
Holmes

Re: Yeah, right.

Yet another urban legend

"Hitler was not socialist at all, on the contrary he was sustained by the big business."

Not true at all. While the Nazi party undoubtedly had funding from biz partners, "Big Business" quickly learnt how the wind was blowing. Not being in control and having some small arsehole with a party card order you around is pretty galling.

Hitler was not socialist at all

How so? A centralised economy, where the good of everyone is rigidly managed by people from the proletariat, from jerks in Three-Letter-Acronym organizations down to the balding, potbellied "Blockleiter" from next door who checks whether your daily routine is party-approved. Private property no longer exists and the individual's power of decision goes to zero. Sounds exactly like what it says on the tin. You may get additional nationalism, but hell, why not.

Of course you must realize that germans were shitting bricks about a possible violent red revolution, and not without reason, the communist agitation was pretty intense (moderate Sozialdemokraten got beaten up by browns and reds...). So better go with the boys in brown instead of the ones in red, at least they are for a German-style order, not a Lenin-style order. So supporting the little mouth-breathing corporal might not be such a bad idea, after all, how bad can he really be? Let's hope for some change etc..

Sounds very 'left', but in fact it was very 'right'

False dichotomy. It's called "collectivism". And truly, Hitler killed less than the other two Great Collectivist Organizations EACH, so he's basically the less worst of them.

2
4
Silver badge

Re: Yeah, right.

an insult to all social democrats, socialists and members of the Communist party who were persecuted and killed by the NSDAP in the Third Reich

Argumentation by sympathy isn't valid. Consider that the German Democratic Republic was a straight-line continuation of 3rd Reich habits, just run by the dudes recently liberated from the camps. No winners. Do not pass go, do not take 1000 Reichsmark.

1
1
Anonymous Coward

Without wishing to sound in any way wacky, permit me to point out something obvious:

This, and your usual choice of icon, and your opinions in general will still make people worship Microsoft and maybe Hitler!

Did I break the code?

0
0

Re: @Eadon

Who was put into camps actually is not the definitive argument. It's not like Marxist-Leninists did not kill other leftists, say SRs, of differing revolutionary opinions, or banned non-communist labor unions (can you say "Solidarity?"). It is not who they ban or kill [killing people not that far in ideology from oneself is actually common to totalitarians, when it is worried that a "heresy" might have actual influence on the inside], it is what they do. Businesses still had owners in Nazi Germany, I believe, but I would like to see far less rhetoric and more real information on how the economy was managed. I understand that it certainly was not quite free enterprise.

0
0

KIRK: But why Nazi Germany? You studied history. You knew what the Nazis were.

GILL: Most efficient state Earth ever knew.

SPOCK: Quite true, Captain. That tiny country, beaten, bankrupt, defeated, rose in a few years to stand only one step away from global domination.

KIRK: But it was brutal, perverted, had to be destroyed at a terrible cost. Why that example?

SPOCK: Perhaps Gill felt that such a state, run benignly, could accomplish its efficiency without sadism.

KIRK: Why, Gill? Why?

GILL: Worked. At first it worked. Then Melakon began take over. Used the. Gave me the drug.

KIRK: Gill. Gill. Gill, can you hear me? You've got to tell those people what happened! You're the only one who can prevent the slaughter! Gill!

5
1
Silver badge
Holmes

That urban legend about efficient Nazis...

They were the most inefficient. Prussian bureaucracy run by ignoramuses and parvenus unbound by any rules and legalities with the typical internecine fights of state bureaucracy rendered tougher because THE PARTY MUST BE OBEYED. Fail harder you can't.

10
0
Silver badge
Big Brother

In furtherance of which I recommend this little gem, written shortly before the war by an emigrated businessman (people where apparently betting on the generals putsching to get the mustachioed one his comeuppance).

When saying 3rd Reich people are into SS this and that and Holocaust (which came quite a bit later) but what is a real eye-opener is the retardation, corruption and dumbass regimentation of the control economy. Like FDR's administration on steroids:

The Vampire Economy: Guenter Reiman

0
1

This post has been deleted by its author

Bronze badge

I remember seeing an documentary a while back

I rememer seeing an documentary a while back

that made the point that in 1940 RAF fighter command was one of the most efficient, (self)disciplined organisations to have ever existed. The Luftwaffe on the other hand was a bunch of egomaniacal cowboys.

Who's who in the current context is left as an exercise for the reader.

5
0
Silver badge

Re: I remember seeing an documentary a while back

Running wartime research like a free-market didn't help either. Lots of competing research groups with no central committee for approving projects and allocating resources? Silly buggers.

3
0

This post has been deleted by its author

Yep, funnily enough, if you confiscate all of the wealth from a significant chunk of your population and default on your debts (when no one's lending to you anyway), you'll suddenly find yourself flush with cash.

And, if you drive an even larger chunk of your population out of work (they drove women out of work as well as people from races they didn't like) then your official unemployment figures will improve.

Two one off ways of creating sudden windfalls that make you look like a genius, provided no one's actually paying attention, but which are actually extremely destructive in the long term (like the Romans, their economic policy was so inefficient that they would have faced economic ruin had they not tried to steal more stuff from their neighbours).

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Can't have been that inefficient if they conquered half of Europe in a year or two? Let's be fair, they knew what they were doing, I know it may seem trendy to suggest otherwise and you can post as many essays about it as you like but the results speak for themselves. They hammered us, for a start, and it took the combined might of the US,UK and Soviet Union to beat them in the end. I wouldn't call that 'inefficient'.

5
0
Silver badge

Re: I remember seeing an documentary a while back

"in 1940 RAF fighter command was one of the most efficient, (self)disciplined organisations to have ever existed. The Luftwaffe on the other hand was a bunch of egomaniacal cowboys."

A bit of a simplification. But excuse none the less to break out the DVD of the 1969 film "Battle of Britain", crank up the surround sound, and sit back and enjoy one of the best war movies ever made.

2
0
Headmaster

Novel tactics and surprise @murph

Nazi Germany stomped over everyone because they used manoeuvre warfare (developed from British and Soviet ideas) properly. They also had speed, aggression and surprise on their side in launching their invasions, so they smashed through neighbouring countries to early tactical victories. They didn't have the resources or manpower to mount amphibious invasions or conquer all of European Russia, let alone Asian Russia. A lot of their invasions were supplied with the war spoils of the previous invasion - Skoda tanks from Czechoslovakia in the invasion of France, French tanks (especially the chassis for artillery) in the invasion of Russia, etc.

Once the slog set in they were in trouble. The British Empire alone had more industrial capacity and manpower than Germany. Add the Soviet Union and the USA, and the Axis was doomed in the long run. German industry was actually rather inefficient too - eg, Germany had 239 different aircraft in service over the course of the war. If a Panther (arguably the best tank of the war) suffered mechanical breakdown or battle damage, it had to be shipped by rail back to Germany for repair, since they were handcrafted to a certain extent.

4
0
Bronze badge

Re: Novel tactics and surprise @murph

you didn't mention concentration of force. While the Panzer spearhead of 1940 was backed with motorized infantry, a large proportion of the German infantry was still reliant on horse or their own feet for mobility.

1
1

Re: Novel tactics and surprise @murph

Indeed - the armoured/motoized spearhead was a novel concept in 1939/40 and punched deep into the opposing forces lines, fracturing the resistance and allowing the footsloggers to mop up.

By 1943/44 everyone had got it, though, thus the stunning failures of the German Army in 1944. At Falaise they tried their usual armoured attack, and the US/UK said "Haha, nope", sidestepped the attack, and attacked on the flanks, leading to the cheery sight of a quarter-million Germans trying to run away down one road. The Soviets, meanwhile, launched Operation Bagration which utterly demolished the German Army's eastern front, and this time it wasn't at the cost of a hundred thousand Russian lives.

0
0
Bronze badge

@murph

Germany entered the war Europe's largest and most industrialized country (Russia was larger, but more backward). It had been preparing for war for years, often covertly and with the assistance of the USSR, while most of Europe was still recovering from the last war. When it attacked, it often had surprise on its side. How could they not have succeeded? Note how quickly Germany surrendered after D-day.

Inefficiency? Devoting rail capacity to Göering and Hitler's looted treasure and transport to concentration camps? Designing and building unreliable and unmaintainable tanks and V weapons? Canceling new weapons projects because "the war will be won before they are ready"? Hitler changing military plans on a whim? Sacrificing whole armies to hold unsustainable positions? Is this efficient? Hardly.

You might read "Double Cross" by Ben Macintyre. The Germans were awarding Iron Crosses to MI5 !

The Allies were far more efficient, if war can be ever be efficient.

2
0
Silver badge
Holmes

Yet another urban legend

Can't have been that inefficient if they conquered half of Europe in a year or two? Let's be fair, they knew what they were doing

No they weren't. Hitler was just a monomanical gambler who struck lucky. If the French had rolled in when he seized Rheinland, it would have been over. When the Anschluss occurred, Mussolini could have struck north and it would have been over. When Hitler turned on Poland, generals were not sure whether they would prevail or what Stalin would do even though there was a contractual agreement about ripping the corpse of Poland. The attack on France could have gone either way - military innovation and daring carried the day over fixed point defense. But then things stalled. Not enough resources to jump the Channel, stupid adventures in the Balkans, too late in the year to roll into Russia. And a wartime control economy brings in the resources only a limited time.

1
1

Re: I remember seeing an documentary a while back

Not really like a free market, but a lot of political pull involved. Money thrown to people with more political connections than brains, starving the actual groups with brains of resources in some cases (hello, Heisenberg).

0
0

They did steal resources from the people they conquered - little-known factoid I read once is that most tanks in the initial invasion of Russia were not German (Czechs and the French had their stuff taken).

0
0

Re: Novel tactics and surprise @murph

Oh yes - German tanks were marvelous weapons only when they worked..

0
0
Paris Hilton

Re: Novel tactics and surprise @murph

That slog thing is a bit reflexive as a claim, Bumpy Cat, but if you said it became harder to amass 16-year-olds who agreed with prurient fascism; you know, keep whaling on that nail.

If you want to do a Mein-Kampf based outcomes assessment, that would be a great deal apropos; might be a great marketing antiwiki for the more profoundly hypocritical spammers. Might work up as a way to cheer up peeps who grabbed the edge of a PTSD in the service (for the light oh...I wasn't going there. I guess I'm critically okay.)

-goals; outperformance

-Start with scarcity; glooorious scarcity, 20,000!!% (double exponential): Necessary condition for skunkworks CMM0

-identify and apply mass-production to fixing natural problem(cough)s; sunrise to move later in day when not so hot: TBD, reverse proton and electron roles; success rapportage from outlying universe promising, human scum making trade/conquest difficult; tsunderetsuris domination complete (now moving to CMM1...)

0
0

Thanks for link...

I'll get this wrong coz I am just up to page 187 of what ultimately appears to be slightly repetitive.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

I guess we'll go to war now.

Ooooo Boo Hoo.. We as the Industrialists, Bankers and Old Guard can't find anywhere to make a profit under the new regime.

ETC

Perhaps they should have tried Vegetative Easing.

0
0

Mein Kampf is many things...

...but Hitlers autobiography it is not.

I've always thought everyone should read it. Preferably under qualified supervision It would immediately put right anyone under the illusion that he was some sort enlightened leader, and expose him for the utterly inconsistent, illogical, ill informed, incompetent, ranting and raving deranged and intellectualy challenged lunatic he was.

15
0
Silver badge

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

This is one of those things that I feel I should experience, but I really can't be bothered to spend any money or time on it when I fully expect to hate it.

...rather like finally trying a Hershey's bar.

4
0
Silver badge

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

I tried a Hershey bar in the states. It was gritty, tasteless plastic rubbish.

Tried one again recently because there's an American import thing down the road from me (that apparently Tesco feels the need to compete with). It wasn't half bad. Still felt a bit like plastic, but they'd done something to change the recipe so it doesn't taste like arse.

I also had a twinkie a while back. I really don't understand why they were so popular.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

"I've always thought everyone should read it."

Well, I know what you mean but it is pretty unreadable. He basically rants incoherently through the whole thing, often contradicting himself on the same page, sometimes the same paragraph. I don't believe anyone could read it cover to cover unless they were already insane.

2
0
Meh

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

I haven't read _Mein Kampf_, but I did find myself having much the same reaction to Ayn Rand's _Atlas Shrugged_, which I heartily recommend people read for educational value. (It's compellingly readable, which is bizarre given that it's a total trainwreck of a book.) Just don't believe it.

Incidentally, did you know _Mein Kampf_ has a sequel? _Zweites Buch_. It was discovered in an air-raid shelter in 1945.

English translations of both are on the intertubes; check out WIkipedia.

2
1
Bronze badge
Holmes

@Peter R.1 - Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

Wrote "[reading Mein Kampf] would immediately put right anyone under the illusion that he was some sort enlightened leader, and expose him for the utterly inconsistent, illogical, ill informed, incompetent, ranting and raving deranged and intellectualy challenged lunatic"

My mother collected many memoirs of mainstream British politicians. Having browsed through them, I came to the same conclusion there. Even the memoirs of Bertrand Russell, supposedly one of the greatest 20th century thinkers, left me seriously disillusioned.

1
0
Bronze badge

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

Any Rand? Horrible writer, and from what I've learned, horrible person

1
1
Silver badge
Devil

Re: Mein Kampf is many things...

She was interesting enough that leftist webzines and zones of goodthink feel the urge to pump out a "weekly article of hate" about her views, which I can only imagine must be strenously followed and parsed by the proletarian acolytes.

Even libertarian Murray Rothbard couldn't avoid a pastiche moment: Mozart was a Red:

The living room of a modern luxury apartment on New York's upper East Side. The walls are a lush, tropical green. Sofa (c), several armchairs and sectional chairs (r) are all over-sized, so designed that no one can sit comfortably in them. Sitting back, no one under eight feet tall could place his feet on the floor. Therefore, for anyone in the room, there are only two alternatives: (a) to sit perched precariously on the edge of the sofa or chair, clinging to one of the arms for support, or (b) to curl up in it, feet pressed against thigh and upholstery.

To CARSON SAND, owner of the apartment, this choice presents no problem. She is now curled up in one of the sectionals (lc), cigarette holder raised aloft. This is to symbolize mocking contempt of, and hostility toward, men, and therefore rationality and high romantic standards.

CARSON is a little woman with straight hair seeping down one side of her face. Her figure can only be described as protoplasmic, amorphous; her age, too, is indeterminate, but is presumably in the fifties. She wears a shapeless suit with military shoulders, in the height of fashion (Moscow, 1925). Her eyes are beady and intent, and when she talks, she is invariably curled up, ready to strike.

CARSON skyrocketed to fame as author on the basis of a novel, eagerly bought for its graphic rape scene. She believes its popularity demonstrates the mass devotion to her philosophical message.

On the other hand, Ayn's righteous anger and attempts at finding an explanation about why the 20th century turned into the largest slaughterhouse moment seen in history are not to be dismissed.

0
2

Hershey Bars. No pub atmosphere at all. Twinkies. YMMV.

I hear the ones from the plant in Pennsylvania are better than OK owing condition, but it's not like there aren't lots of artisinal bars with 20-92% (tastes better than nibs by me) more than 4% cocoa solids. Gritty sounds like it's not a bar made of sugar and fat, and no flour that would make it shortbread, so...was this a thing of focus in the book?

Twinkies are very durable cakes for when a patisserie seems 700-7000km away, and though I would make plans to change this and that (oh ruin, fiber, flavinoid and ALA3; towards a cell signalling narcotic snack food for today) I did like them.

Wouldn't they do better to acquire and study Gone Girl? The words go together, I hear.

0
0
Facepalm

I honestly don't get the big deal, I own a copy of it, it's something everyone with an interest in history and politics should read, alongside The Prince, 1984, A Brave New World, Farenheit 451, etc.

Oh and if you want a good laugh consider this: All those Neo-Nazis who buy the book? The German state of Bavaria owns the rights to the book (until 2015, when it goes into the public domain) and all the royalties collected go to charity, including Jewish groups.

7
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.