back to article New super maxed out on first day of operations

How long does it take to fill a supercomputer? A day, if you're the new Raijin machine at the National Computing Infrastructure (NCI) at the Australian National University. Formally opened to user traffic on Monday, Raijin is a Fujitsu Primergy system with 57,472 SandyBridge cores, 160 TB of main memory, 10 PB of usable high- …

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Pint

"At fire-up, the NCI says Raijin became Australia's number one supercomputer and number 24 in he TOP500 supercomputer list."

But can it poach an egg?

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Silver badge

But can it run Crysis?

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If you pick the right spot, it probably can (poach an egg).

One does wonder what the power budget of this beast is.

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Bronze badge

Yes, but..

...will it blend?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Yes, but..

They could run a simulation of it. Better hope they never ask an AI machine will it blend.

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Trollface

Bah, humbug!

It's because the code was written by off-shore monkeys in Java!

Back in my days we would have fit this sort of thing into 48KB and written it in Assembler, like the gods intended!

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Linux

What OS does it run on?

"Construction of the NCI supercomputer"

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Linux

Tidbits

To answer some of the questions in the comments: it runs Linux (http://www.top500.org/system/177976 - btw, it was #24 on Top500 last November, it is #27 now), the total power is about 1.111MW (#57 on the latest Green500 list - http://www.green500.org/lists/green201211&green500from=1&green500to=100), and once you build such a beast you want it to be utilized as much as possible, so all I've read is that the Aussies consider it useful.

It is not clear what exactly is meant by "spiked to full capacity". I seriously doubt that it ran at the peak performance in terms of petaflops. Most likely this means that they could not fit any more queued jobs at some point. Which usually happens when utilization is at 70-80%, with a good scheduler. If you carefully orchestrate just a few jobs on the first day to use all the machine's resources you can, in principle, fill it to 100%, but that is not normal operation.

[Icon: tooltip says "OS to the Gods", Raijin is a Japanese god, innit?]

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Linux

Re: Tidbits

FYI, Vayu consistently runs its total available CPUs at 90% utilisation or better using their customised PBS with full suspend/resume, user education with respect to I/O and policing of wayward jobs.

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Happy

Nice rack...

Black hole studies, huh? (Giggle)

Anyway. A program that runs on 32K processors. Now that sounds like a nice bit of programming to do over a weekend. I'm struggling to get TSQL queries to behave well just 4 cores.

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All I can think of is how fast will it encode my blu-rays to H264 .mp4's

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Silver badge

My guess, on this much more important question that Crysis framerate ;), is that it'll be able to complete the task in a time span marginally longer than the total read time of the disc. Unfortunately blu-ray drives are not exactly known for read speed...

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Devil

Cue ominous electric flashes and rolling thunder

RC Future Fellow, Associate Professor Evatt Hawkes, had a code running on 32,769 cores - over half the system.

"THEY LAUGHED AT ME AT THE ACADEMY! WHO'S LAUGHING NOW? MUAHAHAHA!!"

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Flame

Re: Cue ominous electric flashes and rolling thunder

SOON! SOON THE WORLD WILL RUN ON INTERNAL COMBUSTION!

AND THEY WILL COME TO ME FOR ITS SECRETS!

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Eddie

"Half of that consumption was down to one job" - Figuring out how to make tea?

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