back to article EU Justice Department stalls India's security clearance

India’s outsourcing giants are likely to face more delays in their frustrated bid to tap a potential IT services market worth $30 billion, after a report emerged suggesting the EU still has big data security concerns with the country. The EU and India have been trying to finalise their Broad-based Trade and Investment Agreement …

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Devil

Out of pure curiosity...

Is the USA included in this list of 'data secure destinations'? Inquiring minds want to know...

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Unhappy

Re: Out of pure curiosity...

"Is the USA included in this list of 'data secure destinations'? Inquiring minds want to know..."

Yes. Probably why the DVLA sent it's driving test data there on a thumb drive (which got lost) and the last 2 UK national censuses were processed by Lochheed Martin, also in the US.

I think Israel is also "trusted."

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Unhappy

Re: Out of pure curiosity...

I wonder what it would take to revoke that 'trusted' status for the US?

Maybe if the EU ever discover that they are completely abusing that trust by spying on every single bit that passes their frontiers, they will revoke the trusted status, will they not?

Oh!

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Re: Out of pure curiosity...

> Is the USA included in this list of 'data secure destinations'? Inquiring minds want to know...

Even more to the point, is Whitehall included in the list of secure destinations, or perhaps should that be the average commuter train out of Waterloo?

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Re: Out of pure curiosity...

I think Israel is also "trusted."

That would make sense. There are so many with an axe to grind trying to break into their shit that their systems are probably the most battle-hardened and bulletproof in the world.

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And in other news British MEPs are helping support amendments to EU data protection that allows data to be exported to the US without your knowledge where they *will* abuse it.

The commission must have known about FISAAA and the risks of the PATRIOT act for quite some time but they deliberately avoided doing anything about it until all opportunities to ignore the issues had been stripped away.

I think Baroness Ludford has a lot to answer for...

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https://www.openrightsgroup.org/blog/2013/baroness-ludford-amendment-opening-the-door-to-fisaaa

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Unhappy

"Is the USA included in this list of 'data secure destinations'? Inquiring minds want to know..."

How will this play with the Indian Snoopers Charter?

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Stop

The Commerce Dept response exemplifies why EU should be cautious

It is very clear that the EU is not in any hurry to give us data secure status. This would hamper the trade talks further.

In other words attempting to validate that the supplier will perform properly, make necessary changes to their practices and honour important laws is seen as being wantonly obstructive. Sadly that agrees with my experience of an outsourcer there: the role of the customer was to be a complaisant cash cow and any disingenuity or blatant lie to sustain such a relationship was possible: a pattern became clear where UK staff new in the project relationship would for the first months be blissfully happy with the experience (and often quietly derisive of their cynicism of the already-burnt colleagues), only to join the cynical ranks about six months later after living through the full littany of excuses and passive-aggressive justifications for.

A bit sad to see the Commerce Dept aligning itself with the crappy middle ranks rather than the more excellent bits of Indian engineering, but given the generally dire performance of Indian bureaucracy I guess they feel better camouflaged there.

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India and secure data

I guess it is a case of India proving that they have both a culture of data security and competence in dealing with data securely. Who knows, although I guess the EU are wasting time and money actively investigating this one?

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Re: India and secure data

What the Indian government has proved is that it is willing and able to implement Cyber Laws in an attempt to get recognition as a “data secure destination” while it makes little or no tangible effort to clear the huge backlog of pending cases in its courts of law.

The consequence of the backlog is that Indian citizens have to either live with justice delayed to them (which is justice denied, as the saying goes) or take the matter up at an alternative forum - that presided over by Indian ganglords, who are able to arbitrate in days and weeks instead of the years and sometimes decades that the Indian courts of law require a case to stretch before pronouncing their judgements.

In light of this perhaps a bargain should be struck to outsource to India and make available to all Indians the more efficient justice system of the US and UK in exchange for recognising it as a “data secure destination”. I think it would be a win-win for all.

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Anonymous Coward

more of my data going to India....

gooooood.

or:

"my data went to India, and all I got is that lousy bank statement and eviction order"

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Re: more of my data going to India....

Indeed. Perhaps the EU are dragging their heels having realised that €30bn spent offshore is (on a 70:30 manpower/hardware split) about half a million European jobs flushed down the drain.

Then again, the EU are quite happy to throw millions of jobs on the climate change bonfire, so perhaps its just the usual EU sluggish incompetence?

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Facepalm

Give up, it's unfixable.

If you have staff working with your sensitive data whose monthly salary is less than what a few rows of that data are worth on the black market, you can guarantee your data will be available on the black market. System security makes no odds, they'll copy it off the friggin' screen by hand if it's worth doing.

As usual, you get what you paid for.

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Anonymous Coward

What do people expect? Staff in India are paid peanuts, then someone comes up-to them offering what to us is a comparatively small sum of cash that's a massive sum to most Indian workers. If you want your employees to respect you, respect them back.

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Anonymous Coward

"what to us"

Downvoted for your assumption that nobody here is from India.

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Megaphone

Along with the data........

........go the jobs of the poor UK IT citizens, adding to the levels of unemployment and benefit costs.

If I was Prime Minister, they would NEVER get "trusted status"!

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