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back to article 'Office Facebook' firm Tibbr wants you to PAY for mobe-meetings app

Tibbr, the social network designed for use at work, now integrates with online meetings for both mobile and desktop clients as it continues to argue that a social workplace is worth paying for. The idea is to let Tibbr users throw together Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting sessions and Skype conference calls with a couple of clicks. …

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Paying for software now considered DAFT

Not software per se. What's daft is the idea that you need a social network site at work. Most people really don't want to socialise with (most) people they work with and for those who need collaboration tools there are other, more mature offerings.

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The only logical explanation...

When you see that MS paid obscene amounts for Yammer (basically a social plugin to Outlook), there is only one logical explanation:

Someone is pouring money into his mate's pocket.

... or... maybe money laundering.

Straight up business just does not make any sense.

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Eh?

The idea is to let Tibbr users throw together Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting sessions and Skype conference calls with a couple of clicks

I can do that on my computer thingy anyway. On the screen thingy - just launch them next to each other.

Unless I use one of those modern W8 thingies.

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Re: Eh?

Ah still haven't managed to find the Desktop yet then? ;-)

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Anonymous Coward

"Yammer is focused on messaging and microblogging, while Tibbr tries to recreate the Facebook experience"

The author of this article has seen Yammer, right?

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Anonymous Coward

"The competition is Yammer, ..."

The author has obviously never heard of Salesforce Chatter!

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Competition

I'd say something like Podio (now owned by Citrix) is far more Facebook-like than Yammer.

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Little tip to people who want to commercialice cloud services

Do the following:

1. Offer the cloud service (for pay if you wish)

2. Offer a simple solution the customer can install themselves for a "local" service, make sure it's easy to install and comes with source code, charge for the initial license and support/updates

The main problems why businesses don't want to pay for cloud services is that once the provider goes titsup their data will be gone, plus in the age of PRISM it's very likely that your competitor might have a copy of your trade secrets.

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