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back to article Albert Einstein brings cheese and clean pyjamas to space station

The European Space Agency has launched another heavy-hauling ATV robot cargo podule on a mission to bring supplies of cheese and fresh pyjamas to the International Space Station. A mighty Ariane-5 rocket stack blasted the 20,190 kg Automated Transfer Vehicle on a trajectory toward the ISS just before 11 pm BST last night, …

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"...treats such as peanut butter..."

Never understood how this vomit-inducing peanut butter can be regarded as edible. (Let the down votes begin!)

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Happy

Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

They probably send non-vomit inducing peanut butter. It's rocket science, after all...

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Boffin

Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

How else will they fix air leaks from micrometeorite damage?

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WTF?

Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

Never mind the peanut butter - much as I love Parmesan, do you really want that smell wafting around a small, sealed space station? Next up - some nice fresh mackerel...

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Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

When is Sweden sending up its next astronaut - zero G surströmming anyone?

From the dawn of YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcnfEVqNdoA

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Happy

Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

Never understood how this vomit-inducing peanut butter can be regarded as edible.

Evil Auditor,

Next you're going to tell us that you're one of those sick perverts who enjoy Marmite.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

... or asparagus.

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JDX
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do you really want that smell wafting around a small, sealed space station

Surely the air is scrubbed continuously.

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Re: do you really want that smell wafting around a small, sealed space station

Yes, but what is scrubbing? the ISS scrubbers are CDRA units. which is a 'Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly'

Converting Carbon Dioxide to Oxygen does not really do much to complex aromatic hydrocarbons (or non-complex ones either!).

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Re: "...treats such as peanut butter..."

I ain't Spartacus,

Isn't Marmite that all-purpose glue? Or was that Nutella?

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Boffin

cheese, yes...

but will there be toast?

Inquiring minds want to know!

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Linux

Re: cheese, yes...

If not they'll have to send Gromit up with some crackers.

<-- icon = master criminal

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Boffin

Serious boffinry angle

Does peanut butter still stick to the roof of your mouth in zero gravity?

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Re: Serious boffinry angle

Also, can we presume that if you drop your toast, neither the peanut butter nor the unbuttered side will hit the ground.

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Re: Serious boffinry angle

Now I have an amusing image in my head of a "dropped" cat floating in the ISS, paws and tail flailing....

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Re: Serious boffinry angle

"Now I have an amusing image in my head of a "dropped" cat floating in the ISS, paws and tail flailing...."

It has to be done, space is the best place for it -- toast tied the the cat's back and butter on the paws.

What better use for the ISS than that?

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Silver badge

20 tonnes of basic supplies, to an established space station only in Earth's orbit, and it'll last a year for a skeleton crew and be more useful as a bin for getting rid of the stuff they've already churned through.

Kinda puts a Mars mission in perspective, unless we want to just start making dumping grounds throughout the route to Mars and the planet itself. That's a heck of a lot of weight and thrust and it doesn't even need to do much to "fall" back to Earth. And that's not even TRYING to be self-sustaining and putting longer-term equipment up there. God knows how many tonnes of soil and equipment you need to start a decent farm that probably won't produce enough food to be self-sustaining.

20 tonnes. 1 year. That's over a tonne a month, on average. Any sort of long-term mission, including heavy equipment and the initial carvings of a base, and getting rid of junk en-route, etc. is going to need a heck of a lot of fuel back here to support it.

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Boffin

<20 tonnes

I suspect that tonne-age includes the ATV itself, so not strictly true to say that the crew are consuming 20 tonnes of consumables per year

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Payload

ATV-4 is carrying a record payload of 2480 kg dry cargo

Anyone know how this compares with the Dragon , both in terms of capacity and cost per mission?

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Re: Payload

"The ATV is the space station's largest resupply vehicle after the retirement of the space shuttle, hauling three times more cargo as Russia's Progress spacecraft and twice as much as SpaceX's commercial Dragon spaceship" - "Each ATV mission costs 450 million euros, or about $600 million, according to ESA"

http://spaceflightnow.com/ariane/va213/130604preview/

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Payload...

The Ariane 5 rocket payload is 24,000 Kg. The ATV payload is 6590 Kg. 2500Kg is ATV propellant for boosting ISS. 860 is to refuel ISS propellant tanks. 2500 Kg is 'Dry Cargo'. 570 Kg is water (for the Russians?).

Falcon 9 lifts 60% of this payload. Falcon Heavy lifts 205% of this payload.

Dragon payload is 3300 Kg, but can return 2500 Kg to the ground.

Cygnus payload is 2700 Kg with no return (launch vehicle, Antares, was just tested)

MPCV loaded is a 21,000 Kg payload, that can be lifted on F9 or Atlas or Delta.

Just some numbers for comparison...

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Unhappy

Re: Payload...

So much payload, but no Nutella? Damn.

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Meh

Gah!

Nutella *is* vomit-inducing, unlike Peanut Butter.

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Re: Payload...

Thanks. Together with the other numbers it sounds like it's reasonably cost-effective.

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Coat

Re: Gah!

Load the crew with Nutella, face them in the appropriate direction and let fly! With true projectile vomiting it should provide a bit of reaction mass. Projectile vomiters will need to be strapped down though.

Mine's the one with the back-of-the-napkin calculations.

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Facepalm

The plural of spacecraft is spacecraft, not spacecrafts ... right?

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That's what I thought as well...

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Headmaster

After a little bit of Google I found that the following was apparently true :

Because the word "craft" is both singular and plural then spacecraft should follow suit.

Craft in this context refers to the floating, flying kind and not the hobby variety.

Airplanes and boats are collectively known as kinds of craft.

Knitting and woodwork are collectively known as crafts.

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Happy

That's just because you follow the grammar-nazis like sheeps...

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Trollface

Woolly sentence

So you're saying we follow the grammar, and that nazis like sheep? Cool.

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Happy

It's quite normal for someone that was brought up on a farm with lots of fishs, geeses and mooses.

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Coat

You can make effective micrometeorite shielding from cheese?

You'd of thunk.

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JDX
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Parmesan

I'd imagine grating cheese in zero-g is interesting.

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Coat

Sorry, guys, but there was a small typo in the article

It should have been "...threats such as peanut butter..."

You are welcome.

Yes, I'm leaving already.

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Thumb Up

whilst taking the dog for a late night whizz......

Just seen Albert fly overhead. Never fails to amaze me the way they arrive right on time. They never seem to get stuck in traffic.

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Boffin

Re: whilst taking the dog for a late night whizz......

We'll assume they've paid their congestion tax.

Even boffins can't out untax like Google et all can untax.

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They're gonna stink out the entire space station with feet cheese?!

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Joke

In other news

In other news, NASA announced overnight it is sending a rescue mission to the International Space Station for a crew member who mistook a tube of epoxy patching material for peanut butter. The unnamed crew member is temporarily being fed through a drinking straw, but will require surgery to remove internal adhesions.

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