Feeds

back to article Dell bucks PC market tumble with Haswell business systems

PC sales may be tanking around the world, but that hasn't stopped Dell from refreshing its business-class desktop, all-in-one, and laptop lines. "We have taken outstanding products and made them even better with improved performance, sleek design and state-of-the-art security and management capabilities,” Dell's VP for PCs Kirk …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
FAIL

How many articles is that on Dell now?

Crikey! If I didn't know any better, I'd say that either Dell paid El Reg loadsa money to plaster Dell news articles all over their main page or it's been a slow news week (the industry's on holiday, is it?) so they've just copied and pasted all the press releases from the beleaguered PC maker.

I count no less than six (6!) news articles that are directly about some 'me too' product or another that they're releasing.

0
5

Re: How many articles is that on Dell now?

Those of us who have to support clients that only run DELL. This is excellent news, although I wish they would spend money on Latitude and Optiplex instead of Vostro range.

Best machines I have ever used are Optiplex and Latitude. Nothing else has come close but Vostro's have always given me problems when I have used them.

1
1
Bronze badge

Re: How many articles is that on Dell now?

I like to know which Optiplexes I'll be buying second-hand for work, in about three years' time.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: How many articles is that on Dell now?

This is an IT news site. If Dell are the only ones releasing much just now, even if "me too" it is still news. You know, you don't *have* to read it!

4
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: How many articles is that on Dell now?

agreed we're a DELL shop and only buy Optiplexs (we go for the USFF versions) and Latitudes. Always found pricing and support to be very good, can't say we have many issues at all.

0
0

Re: How many articles is that on Dell now?

Same here, I'm on to my second second-hand Latitude ultralight (or whatever) laptop. They run a modern efficient OS just fine and can be picked up for a song. Often still in pristine condition, cos they've been sat in the CEO's desk drawer for three years doing nothing.

0
0
Silver badge
Flame

Faster access to components?!

Why is it that Dell (and other "corporate" PC vendors) hold to the idea that it's quicker to get at a machine's innards if you don't need a screwdriver? My experience has always been that by the time you've worked out which tricky little catches to release and what to slide in which direction, you could have replaced a disk drive in a drive bay in a well-designed machine where it's held in place with screws.

And shortly after you've worked it out, you'll notice blood dripping from a finger, and have to take a break to find a sticking-plaster.

(Are there really any service engineers out there so dim that they can't use a screwdriver? )

1
3
Silver badge

Re: Faster access to components?!

Yes, there are times that I curse Dell puzzles. But truth be told, I'd rather that than having to carry around a belt load of screwdriver bits: Philips, flathead, Torx, modified Torx, whatever those square things are called, etc. etc. And God help us all when somebody patents a new fastener.

That being said, the reality is they use the puzzles to reduce manufacturing costs. Seems counter-intuitive, but that's the root cause.

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Faster access to components?!

Funny, on the PCs I maintain today I've never needed anyting other than a #1 cross-head.

I do remember that early Dells were assembled with a nightmare mix of Philips, flat, Torx, hex-head, and OMG tamper-proof. But that was a LONG time ago.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.