back to article Kaspersky plans source code reveal to avoid Huawei's fate

Eugene Kaspersky thinks Huawei's products contain “some doors, they are not back doors, but somewhere in-between”, but that overall “there is nothing really wrong with Huawei”. The Russian security supremo is nonetheless taking steps to ensure his company doesn't experience the same less-than-welcoming reception Huawei has found …

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Anonymous Coward

No complaints

I'm not complaining, since using Kaspersky for a good number of years my computer has never had a virus or other nasty. OK so it may have the odd back door for the Russian security services to play with but it has never been detrimental to me in any way.

The poacher turned gamekeeper operates with the blessing of Putin, so long as nothing messes up my PC's I've no problem with it.

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Silver badge

Re: No complaints

If the man is prepared to walk the walk then best of luck to him. Could you imagine the ridicule if some of the other vendors showed their code what with the oft remarked resource hogging?

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Happy

Re: No complaints

Just remember that you're dealing with a guy who thinks that the internet gives people "too much freedom", and doesn't want you to be anonymous - http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2012/07/kaspersky-indy/

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Anonymous Coward

This article bounces around so much I can't make head nor tail of it.

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Happy

Don't you know that's how all Russian communications are handled. You never know where you stand after reading/hearing them.

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K
Bronze badge

Its a good product..

I recently migrated the office from Trend Micro to Kaspersky, overall its a much better product. The management interface is well designed and the product works well.. Though be warned don't use the default settings as they are really "high" and will hammer the system, but a little optimisation and it runs like a dream.

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Anonymous Coward

reason enough to avoid

"OK so it may have the odd back door for the Russian security services to play with but it has never been detrimental to me in any way. The poacher turned gamekeeper operates with the blessing of Putin, so long as nothing messes up my PC's I've no problem with it."

I can't work out if this post is supposed to be sarcastic or not. I hope to f*** it is.

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Bronze badge

To be honest I worry more about my own countries' governments

To be honest I worry more about my own countries' government (Canada and UK), and the US government than Russian hackers or the FSB.

Not that I loose great amounts of sleep about any of them, but I feel that the greatest threat to the future is security and police services suppressing free speech using secret files to blackmail politicians, journalists and celebrities, just like J. Edgar Hoover did, resulting in my countries become police states.

This could be a big problem when the mySpace/Facebook/Twitter generation starts holding elected office.

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Coffee/keyboard

Re: To be honest I worry more about my own countries' governments

You got a good point there; unless you have serious IP to protect, the Russians are the least risk! I have never been able to get clients with the yips about the old cold war to go to Kasperski. The younger kids are not as reserved. Personally, I'd rather use Avast anyway.

I use Kasperski's rescue disc 10 and there is always something they can't find or remove/repair. Lately I've found MBAR to be particularly effective without even having to use the boot and nuke method. Malware-Bytes Anti-Rootkit does a better job of assuring the MBR will be bootable after action. With Rescue Disk 10 not so much.

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Anonymous Coward

> “We are not going to detect Huawei software as malicious,” he said. “And it is not just Huawei that has this grey area in their products. There was a very famous story about Sony rootkits,”

So Huawei's "grey area" is comparable to Sony's highly illegal and demonstrably malicious rootkit and it's not being flagged as a threat?

That's rather alarming.

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Coat

Keep calm and carry on

We don't have enough information about the Huawei side door to assess if it should be detected or not as there's rather hazy information.

At the same time, vulnerable software isn't malicious, the exploit is malicious.

Also depends on what gems the side door opens and how you can get through it - remote? USB debugger?.

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WTF?

“some doors, they are not back doors, but somewhere in-between”

Those would be side doors, then. Or interior doors if you take a direct-line approach.

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Happy

“some doors, they are not back doors, but somewhere in-between”

So that must be... TRAP DOORS!

Yevgeny is doing the smart thing with this preemptive strike. If he waits until the State Department gets suspicious to say "look how clean we are" it sounds like the typical denials.

"I kill so many journalists..." Get off, any FPS shooter says that. I've killed my mates dozens of times, and hundreds of strangers online. Come to think of it, I've been Terminated quite a lot too!

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Anonymous Coward

Sort of back doors?

Huawei's products contain “some doors, they are not back doors, but somewhere in-between”, but that overall “there is nothing really wrong with Huawei”.

WTF, I had always thought this guy really understood security.

Based on that statement, if I were using anything from Kaspersky, I would be in the process of removing it.

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Re: Sort of back doors?

He also understands the press and how to communicate effectively. That's why he is rich.

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t-shirt

How was he allowed to wear a 3-kiwi tshirt in Sinny?

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