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back to article US government wants security research on car-to-car nets

David Strickland, Administrator of the USA's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), has told that nation's Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation that he plans to research the security requirements of automated cars and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) networks. Strickland appeared before the …

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Silver badge

Now ask me why ...

... most of my personal fleet is restored pre-1970 vehicles.

Once the .gov gets involved, we're all hosed ...

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Happy

Re: Now ask me why ...

"... most of my personal fleet is restored pre-1970 vehicles."

Because your vacation home is a bunker in Montana?

Some days it's just too easy.

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Silver badge

Re: Now ask me why ...

No bunker in Montana (I voted for Obama[1], so that lot would probably crucify me) ... No vacation, either, not since 1998 or thereabouts. Running a multi-property ranch spread out over four States is our 24/7/365.25 retirement option ...

Why restore old cars? Because I can, and enjoy it. Think meditation. Besides, if it breaks down when on the road, I can usually patch it up enough to get home with little more than a multitool, ductape, bailingwire & chewing gum. This hasn't needed to be an option in over 20 years, though.

[1] Best option of a bad couple choices, at least if you're capable of thinking for yourself.

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Unhappy

Re: Now ask me why ...

" Best option of a bad couple choices, at least if you're capable of thinking for yourself."

Sadly I think that's a fairly common situation in all elections.

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Can't see what could possibly go wrong with this. I mean, we appear incapable of even making a calculator that doesn't have some gaping chasm of a security hole.

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MJI
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Reboot

Done that before, to get to & from work, used a code reader.

Actually a full reset while driving, so I could get more than one gear.

Gearbox in limp mode, reset, got a couple more gears and a few new ones,

Yes I found a new gear in my gear box lock up second.

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Level 5

Full automation plus car is artificially intelligent and has weekly crime fighting adventures with big haired owner.

*Requires red light thing at the front.

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M7S
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Stop

"proposals that would see one car radio another to tell it when heavy braking is required"

So if I lived in the US and had the technical know how (or a transmitter bought from the wrecker's yard):

that's one to be fitted to the kid's bicycle to create a safe zone around them with nothing else moving within 200 ft on their way to school;

one to be fitted to the car with a manual trigger to get that tractor-trailer rig I'm trying to pass but who speeds up a bit as I pull out to let me in; also to get the driver of that Ponctiac who thinks he can overtake ME (the cheek!) to find suddenly he can't

one perhaps on each lamppost on the street so our kids can play safe..

Someone's going to be the first to do it....

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Pint

Re: "proposals that would see one car radio another to tell it when heavy braking is required"

Absolutely.

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Unhappy

“vehicle cybersecurity”

That horse has well and truly bolted already. A while ago, El Reg reported on a fascinating paper describing how researchers attached a radio device to a car's system bus and were able to take control of anything. In theory there's supposed to be security separating the safety-critical systems from things like the radio, but they found that it was easily circumvented, and that they were able to take over the brakes and accelerator of a moving car.

You only have to spend some time with the UI of a car's computer to realise that it was designed by people who are new to this sort of thing, and probably more at home with nuts and bolts.

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Re: “vehicle cybersecurity”

IIRC you had to be IN the car to attach something to the car's system bus. Or are you saying this will translate to the wireless transmissions, saying they will inevitably be hacked all to pieces?

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Facepalm

At least someone is paying attention

Do we REALLY need our cars networked and software driven?

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Terminator

Hmmm, lets see...

I'll take a level 4 SUV with the reclining "magic fingers" massage option, remote start, in-route entertainment system, auto-park option, minibar dash option, run flat tires, and mini-keg cooler. In green, of course. And I want hybrid, so it gets 20 MPG instead of 14 MPG.

This may be a good thing. Computers don't get mad at trash trucks, school buses, slow Prius drivers, and of course, the ever infuriating bicyclists (or whatever those bike-tards call themselves now). Less stress = WIN. I just wonder how a level 4 vehicle can identify a bicycle rider. Ba-bump, ba-bump - what was that ? Must have been a raccoon !

Terminator because the cars will eventually figure out they're more intelligent than the drivers. Then...

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Anonymous Coward

As could just enforcing the existing laws!

“potentially address about 80 percent of crashes involving non-impaired drivers once the entire vehicle fleet is equipped with V2V technology.”

Or, they could start just enforcing the existing laws of "at least 2 seconds following distance". But that would require law enforcement to actually look around rather than waiting for their ticket generatorradar gun to go off.

Maybe if they also said "You rear-end somebody, you owe them a new car."

(sniff. I miss my 1973 Mercury Monterrey Custom with the real "zero damage" 5MPH bumpers. I was rear-ended once: totaled the other car, didn't even scratch the chrome on mine.)

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Joke

Was I the only one reading...

"proposals that would see one car radio another to tell it when heavy drinking is required"

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Anonymous Coward

TLP too?

This reminds me of the TLP - Traffic Light Protocol already enshrined in some international standards

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WTF?

FBI, et al, will demand backdoors

The Ontario Provincial Police pioneered, in Canada, the use of air-bag controls to ascertain the actions of a driver immediately prior to a accident using the data to, in effect, self-convict an at-fault driver. I removed all the circuitry and mounted them in a location disguised as a body component and requiring a hoist for access on my SUV.

In this latest wet-dream, just how 'dead' are systems in Level 2 and above? Are they quiescent but monitoring/recording?

Additionally, it would make a perfect accessory for Plod to actually bring vehicles either to a stop or render them inoperative.

Do we need to give Plod any more powers than they have already?

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Stop

Further proof

"We are also developing countermeasures to prevent these security credentials from being stolen or duplicated."

This just proves security should /always/ be developed by politicians and administrators. It seems they're going with the well-documented "security through obscurity" approach rather than trying to roll their own...

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