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back to article Fried-egg sarnies kick off Reg man's quid-a-day nosh challenge

Coffee, bacon and black pudding were strictly off the menu this morning as this hack kicked off his "Live Below the Line" challenge with a couple of fried-egg sarnies and a mug of builders' tea. Until Friday, I have to subsist on just £1 a day for food as I participate in "an innovative awareness and fundraising campaign that's …

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Good luck Lester...

In a slightly similar vein, I'm actually calculating exactly how much I spend on food a week. It looks like I'm going to blow through €6 before the end of the day (and that's after cutting down on extravagances like shop-bought sandwiches)

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Joke

Re: Good luck Lester...

Wish you well, although Fried-Egg Sarnie would be a great name for a future Android OS :)

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FAIL

Re: Good luck Lester...

Android OS names are incremented alphabetically. The next one should start with K, then L, M, N, O etc. They are also all desserts/sweets, so that's two reasons why you won't be seeing Fried-Egg Sarnie as an Android OS name.

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Trollface

Not joining you. Sorry.

Ironically my lunchtime steak and ale pie - complete with delicious mash and gravy - cost £5.00.

(Should have saved this post for Friday, when it really would have hurt.)

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(Written by Reg staff) Bronze badge

Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

That's really unnecessary. Steak is but a distant dream this morning...

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Devil

Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

Went to a beefeaters on Saturday. Steak skewers, 10oz Ribeye (medium rare) with bacon cheese and a gorgonzolla sauce, and then a banoffee sundae for desert. £30 well spent methinks.

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Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

You need to look at reruns of Morecombe and Wise, where they hung up the tea bags to dry, that will save you a few extra cents.

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(Written by Reg staff) Bronze badge

Re: Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

The tea's rough enough already, without recycling the bags.

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Def
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Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

Five quid in Sunny Norway is about 45 kroner. In all honesty, you'd have trouble buying a quarter of what you did for the same money in Spain. A litre of milk here costs about 23kr alone.

I bought a small (and not very nice if I'm being honest) chicken wrap in the office canteen at lunch today. With a piddly glass of orange juice I spent 43kr. :(

I reckon we (my girlfriend and I) spend on average about 800kr a week on food.

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Happy

Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

console yourself with this thought; if his entire meal is a fiver I doubt he's having much steak either ;-)

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JDC

Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

I'll be heading through Barco de Avila tomorrow, are you allowed red cross style food parcels?

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(Written by Reg staff) Bronze badge

Re: Re: Not joining you. Sorry.

I'm not, but I'll buy you a coffee for the offer, if you fancy it.

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Best of luck with that, Lester!

Strikes me as a hell of a challenge...

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A week on eggs and lentils?

You should have budgeted a few quid for extra bog roll methinks.

Joking aside though, fair play to you.

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Anonymous Coward

Exchange Rate

Are you sure the exchange rate is correct? Looking at Oanda I see EUR -> GBP is 1,18710 which gives you for GBP 7, EUR 8,31. Thus loads more to spend.

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Re: Exchange Rate

Try here:

http://www.xe.com/currencyconverter/convert/?Amount=5&From=GBP&To=EUR

5 quid = 5.93323 euros

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Dozen eggs for a euro?

You can't even get half dozen for £1 anymore over here.

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Go

Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

Yeah, a dozen eggs is around £2 over here. Then again, he doesn't get cheap noodles or Tesco Value Sliced Foam, err, Bread. Also there's learning the time the supermarket puts out the damaged food for cheap and going there everyday to try and pick up a bargain. And lastly, for a long term plan, grow your own veg using cheap veg seeds (lidl, etc) - not that many UK people on the breadline seem to do this.

The bones are a good idea for flavour, but not easy to get in many places in the UK. Chick peas and Rice is a good idea, again he can't get vast bags of value pasta shapes it appears. Dried lentils? Dried beans?

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

Yes you can... I drive past a farm on the way to work every morning selling eggs at £1 for 6

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

I have two chickens, and I worked out that after feed, bedding and sundries, I am paying just over 30c for a dozen eggs.

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

Umm, that works out at £2 for a dozen eggs... that's somewhat over €2

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

" Also there's learning the time the supermarket puts out the damaged food for cheap and going there everyday to try and pick up a bargain."

Well, you'll have to endure the scrum of rabid pensioners. Maybe wait til afterwards, and pick up any roadkill OAPs who are trampled to death, and eat them. Is that allowed?

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

Yes you can. The giant Walmart/ Asda near me does 6 free range eggs for £1. Then again, I do live up North.

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

@ Goldmember

You do realise that a dozen is 12 I assume, therefore said 12 eggs would cost £2 or about €2 not the €1 that was paid.

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Happy

Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

I am more concerned with the age of the eggs. Anybody with childhood memories with eggs kept in water in the small shops. If it floats it's too old, the more air there is the older. Or eggs on top of some system with light beneath, perhaps, revealing if there is a chick inside. Eggs at supermarkets tend to be old, and there is not much to do about it.

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Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

@ Ivan 4

The line we are replying too when we say we get 6 for £1 would be "You can't even get half dozen for £1 anymore over here."

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Facepalm

Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

@Ivan 4

Quote: "You can't even get half dozen for £1 anymore over here."

HALF a dozen would be 6. Hence my comment about buying 6 eggs, which you can indeed buy for £1 (up north).

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Coat

Re: Dozen eggs for a euro?

I seem to remember during a spat we had with another European country some seventy odd years ago, when we had an allocation of one egg per week, a dozen eggs on the bl*ck m*rk*t cost 5 shillings, allegedly.

Yes, it a 'Utility' coat.

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All the best mate

And may Saturday arrive as fast as possible (I doubt I could make do with only 30 teabags, so fair play).

Eggs and chickpeas - eek.

I think I'd be living alone if I had that diet.

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Calories

A quick tot-up at the calorie counter gives the following:

1kg rice (raw) ~ 4,000

800 gm loaf ~ 2,100

1kg chickpeas (dry) 3,700

12 fried eggs ~ 1,000

Bones - reckon on 200gm of fat @ 8cal/gm = 1,600

semi skimmed milk (iltr) ~ 600 - shoulda gone for full-fat!

and ignoring the teabags & spices as being insignificant.

That gives a total calorie intake of about 13,000 for the week, or 1,850 / day. So you might even lose a bit of weight - though I doubt that was part of the plan. Now, about those greens ...

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Re: Calories

Not many people seem to have spotted that this is a five-day "week". That's 2,600 calories per day. According to the NHS, the average man needs about 2,500 calories per day to maintain his weight - about right.

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Re: Calories

From the article:

> Or rather, I have to make do with just €6 for the week

But you're absolutely right. I wonder is anyone's going to wait until Sunday evening to tell Lester ...

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Re: Calories

"According to the NHS, the average man needs about 2,500 calories per day to maintain his weight"

According to the same NHS, the average man is an FB, and would be well advised not to maintain his weight.....

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Good luck

Slightly peeved I had to donate a round number. Perhaps it's sad but I like it when people raise XXX pounds and 13p...

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Re: Good luck

Good man - I saw your donation. I may counterattack later by chipping in the £4 to round that back up.

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Happy

Amateur!

Unless you like your tea exceedingly strong, you should be able to get at least 1.5 mug's worth of tea from each tea bag. Just make sure you remove the bag before adding the milk then put it to one side on a saucer or similar, and it will keep even overnight and still give off some amber goodness next time you brew up.

@Wowfood - depends on how fussy you are about your eggs. Asda has 15 eggs for £1.34 if you don't mind them being not free range, & a couple in each box being on the small-ish size (but still around medium). Morrisons are a little more expensive, but still around £1.65 for the same number of slightly smaller eggs.

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Trollface

Re: Amateur!

From my school days!

Question, "What goes in dry, comes out wet & gives pleasure for two?"

Answer, " A tea bag!"

After everyone has had a polite chuckle chip in "Ha ha! Fooled you all, it was a willy!"

"

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Do they not have street markets over in Spain?

That's the kind of place you should have been looking, and for things like boxes of veg. Meat, and dairy are mostly right out.

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Re: Do they not have street markets over in Spain?

If Lester's markets are anything like the ones I've been to in Spanish towns, the meat is not covered and unrefrigerated on display, of an unknown age and origin. I'd prefer to go vegetarian. Though the veggies will only be what's in season, so not a lot of choice at this time of year.

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Re: Do they not have street markets over in Spain?

As I recall, most of our supermercat meat is also of unknown origin

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Re: Do they not have street markets over in Spain?

They do- they are called mercadillos- great for fresh fruit and veg.

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Re: Do they not have street markets over in Spain?

"As I recall, most of our supermercat meat is also of unknown origin"

Rubbish everybody knows where it comes from, it was the one that fell in the 3.30 at Kempton.

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LPF
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Did you have any open air markets around your place, the amount you can bug for £1 will feed you for quit a bit, but yeah agree on the bog roll, your stomach is going to act up big time! Plain rice is a bugger, should have ot some more herbs to kick it up a notch!

But fair play to you mate!

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If Hugh fearlessly eats it all

I'm sure you could. If you're not adverse to a little blood and stuff you should be able to put in fresh road kill to the 'stew' as that is free! And there should be wild growing herbs around you in Spain to add flavours to a basic 'stew'.

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Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

Because I image some of those ingredients will take a lot of cooking.

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Re: Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

It's a fair point. I'll add up the real cost, including energy, at the end of the challenge.

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Mushroom

Re: Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

You could always burn your own dung for heat and cooking!

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Re: Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

in that case, probably worth boiling up the rice in just two batches for efficiency ?

2 because I'm assuming use of a fridge is cheating.

I must admit, I'd have just went for making a big veg soup (+ the bones - that was a good idea), and maybe a bunch of flour (50p 2kg bag would make loads of bread). Nice soup and fresh bread ! soup would only need cooking on day 1 and would last all week. Only other need for cooking would be a batch of bread on day 1 and day 3.

- Just made enough leek and potato soup at the weekend for 6 meals: 3 quid. (2 leaks, potatoes, onion, stock cube)

stu

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Pirate

Re: Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

Cooked rice is a common source of food poisoning. It should be cooled directly after being fully cooked, then stored in a fridge for no more than one day.

The risk is that spores of Bacillus Cereus remain on partially cooked rice, which germinate into bacteria. These will then multiply and may produce toxins that cause all manner of nasty side-effects. Reheating the rice won't get rid of these toxins, so the longer cooked rice is left at room temperature, the more likely it is that bacteria, or the toxins they produce, could stop the rice being safe to eat.

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Devil

Re: Does this £1/day include energy costs ?

"You could always burn your own dung for heat and cooking!"

I doubt it. If the tods are dry enough, and your diet high enough in plant materials, then there's a chance it will give out some modest heat because the lignin fibres that your body hasn't digested do have a similar energy content as wood fibres of similar weight. But lookin at what Lester's selected the rice doesn't look to be whole grain, eggs will leave nothing, chick peas will be good, so on balance I reckon he'll be crimping off lengths of regular clay, and that doesn't burn well even if dried.

If you don't have any other choices, dried elephant dung picked up off the African savannah may be a just about useable fuel, but for the reasons above I doubt that Reg writer droppings will be anything like as good. This is why sewage plant companies have to use fossil fuels to incinerate sewage sludges. If Lester has got some of the fine sieves used in (for example) sedimentology, then he could dissolve his dreadnoughts and used tissue in a bucket of water, and filter the resulting solution, rinse a few times, and he'll have the lignin fibres on their own, ready to use as soon as they are dried. Even so, any neighbours may take issue with Lester's renewables, and the actual energy recovered will be very small indeed. Like most other forms of renewable energy, in fact.

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