back to article Boffins spin a solid state qubit in a nucleus

A group of researchers from the University of New South Wales has produced a functioning solid-state qubit with a read-out fidelity of 99.8 percent, taking the world another step along the path towards a functioning quantum computer. The team used the magnetic spin of the phosphorus nucleus as the basis for their experiment, …

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Happy

I must be dotty

Cause this news put me in a bit of a spin

Nice Work!

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Pretty cool and all,

but they might need to eliminate the MRI machine to make it really practical.

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FAIL

Re: Pretty cool and all,

But where do they install the cat?

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Boffin

Re: Pretty cool and all,

Next to the chameleon?

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Anonymous Coward

eh ?

"This experiment was about storage, rather than superposition: the information was stored by controlling the up-down direction of the nucleus' magnetic spin."

If they aren't measuring superpositions how do they know it's a real qubit and not classical nuclear spin storage ?

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Coat

Re: eh ?

Maybe it is, maybe it isn't... it's all a bit tangled.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: eh ?

Maybe but I didn't observe it so I'm not sure ..

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Re: Nicho

It's quantum.

So you can sit there in a state of both understanding it and not understanding it at the same time.

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Happy

Re: Nicho

Well I'm already half-way there then.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Nicho

@dan 55 - that's what Zeno thought ..

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Pirate

Re: Crisp

But is "both understanding it and not understanding it" a quantum state or a Zen state?

Clean your soup bowl!

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Silver badge

Re: quantum state or a Zen state?

There's no reason that it can't be both at the same time!

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Pirate

Re: quantum state or a Zen state?

True. And likewise, no reason it can't be neither at the same time.

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Yag
Trollface

Reliability of 99.8 percent?

It's far enough to be used right now in SSDs...

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The problem with quantum computers

...is how many qubits they can entangle without the whole lot decohering. If they want to break 128 bit keys, they will need 128 bits. This new tech will only be interesting if it leads to a massive increase in the number of entanglable qubits...

I think the top number achieved so far is eight. Just enough for a quantum Commodore 64 :D

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Unhappy

Who watches those watching everything?

Am I the only one who thinks we are not socially ready for quantum computing?

I'm not scientist or a computer technician but everything I've read about quantum computers suggests a working model will be something like an electron microscope and an MRI machine. What I mean is that it will require extreme cold, a lot of energy, a dedicated staff of highly specialized operators and a building or two. In other words only those with the cash of governments, large corporations, major institutions and possibly organized crime and rogue states will be able to afford one. Which leaves all the rest of us at their mercy. Considering how well they've handed all the other responsibilities awarded to them by their largess can we really trust them with the ability to see everything?

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Pirate

Re: Who watches those watching everything?

"it will require extreme cold, a lot of energy, a dedicated staff of highly specialized operators and a building or two"

So, pretty much like computers in the 40's and 50's... at least that's how it looks on my Google Nexus 7.

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Re: Who watches those watching everything?

This is exactly what computers looked like, half century ago. And they were very, VERY primitive, by today's standards.

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Meh

Quantum computing moves one Bohr unit closer to practicality.

Well it no longer requires a mist of metal atoms in a UHV chamber and might be reducible to something that (more or less) fits on a chips.

Quantum computing is shaping up to be the GaAs of the 21st century.

The computing technology of the future.

Always was, always will be.

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