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back to article Dinosaur embryos FOUND: Resurrection 'out of the question'* - boffin

Dinosaur embryos wiggled around in their eggs just like the embryos of modern birds, scientists have found. The boffins made the discovery after a cache of fossilised dino bones and eggs were dug up in southwest China. The scientists are hoping to find out more about the Jurassic-era creatures by analysing remnants of complex …

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Nature finds a way

As long as they only create female dinosaurs I do not see what could possibly go wrong.

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Re: Nature finds a way

As long as they write all the controls in Unix, a 12 year old girl will be able to reactivate all the security systems, so it'll be fine

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Re: Patients?

heh, that was an sgi crimson iirc? Didn't they do a hollywood and have something like a quadra sat on the desk though with the monitor hooked up to the crimson?

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Re: Nature finds a way

“resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question."

No problem, if there are gaps in teh DNA just fill them in with frog DNA. What could possibly go wrong?

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Re: Patients?

It was definitely in SGI IRIX system, running File System Navigator. Good times.

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jai
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"resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question"

Of course, that's exactly what they would say, while they're quietly buying up an island in the pacific and installing their top secret "research facility / safari park" before anyone notices...

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Re: Patients?

Check France, they have been acting a little shifty lately. Perhaps trying to find a dino frog with huge legs?

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Black Helicopters

Re: Patients?

France always acts a little shifty. When they STOP acting shifty, worry.

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Re: "resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question"

And that's quite enough of the politics. [shudder]

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Re: "resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question"

>Of course, that's exactly what they would say, while they're quietly buying up an island in the pacific and installing their top secret "research facility / safari park" before anyone notices...

Somewhere near where they had the radiation leak in Japan. That would make sure no tourists accidentally landed there.

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Happy

Re: "resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question"

the resurrected mother's much delayed burial service is next Wednesday.

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So there is not enough DNA to recreate a dinosaur from its bones...

but maybe there is enough genetic information in living organisms to extrapolate. Go find that DNA preserving sponge creature that forgot to throw out the ancient DNA of something the ancient ancestor ate :).

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Anonymous Coward

Re: So there is not enough DNA to recreate a dinosaur from its bones...

That's so crazy, it just might work!

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Happy

Defuse The Situation

I think they should resurrect dinosaurs & just release them en masse to the wild. Fighting off giant predators would not only defuse many global tensions it would also add a bit of excitement to boring periods at the office (like now...).

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Re: Defuse The Situation

Boss, could you please help.

I can't write this function up if that pesky pterodactyl keeps banging on the window asking for more rats!

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Coat

Re: Defuse The Situation

Might be good to release a batch of them in North Korea. Not only would it give the Nork's military something useful to do, but it would also be a new food source. That would have to be a win-win situation!

Dave

P.S. I'll get my coat. It's the one with the "Tastes like chicken" labels in the pocket.

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Pint

Re: Defuse The Situation

"Raptors can open doors, but they are slowed by them. Using the floor plan on the next page, plot a route through the building, assuming raptors take 5 minutes to open the first door and half the time for each subsequent door. Remember, raptors run at 10 m/s and they do not know fear."

This *forced* me to look up xkcd raptor cartoons ;)

http://xkcd.com/292/

http://xkcd.com/87/

http://xkcd.com/758/

http://xkcd.com/135/

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Dinosaur resurrection out of the question!

They are all chicken!

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Childcatcher

Re: Dinosaur resurrection out of the question!

They are all chicken!

They all taste like chicken!

... Fixed that for you.

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Happy

Re: Dinosaur resurrection out of the question!

At least it's a break from horse :)

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Re: At least it's a break from horse

Horse is tasty. A pub near where I used to live got done for serving horse, they had a reputation for serving excellent steak at reasonable prices.

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There's a good article in the April issue of National Geographic about the current state of play of the technology involved in cloning extinct species, and as I understand it the current approach is to pick a similar species, modify individuals of that species so that their genetic payload corresponds to that of the species you want to breed, then have them mate. The idea is that it's possible to create certain gene sequences and implant them as required, but you need a suitable recipient for the idea to work.

Apparently there are folk working on the passenger pigeon and the sabre-toothed tiger, so while dinosaurs might be out we could at some point see formerly-extinct species revived through the unholy artsscience.

(For those interested, the article is here.)

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WTF?

... Now I'm worried.

Sabre toothed pigeons will make trafalgar square a very different experience...

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Re: ... Now I'm worried.

Don't worry, they're already developing sabre toothed wooly chihuahuas to combat the sabre toothed pigeon.

What could possibly go wrong?

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Re: ... Now I'm worried.

But think how cool it would be to have a passenger tiger!

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Pirate

Re: ... Now I'm worried.

But, it might go the other way and we'd have Flying Tigers that don't need aviation fuel.

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Coat

Re: ... Now I'm worried.

Tiger Airways would file a lawsuit.

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re: Apparently there are folk working on

I wonder what happened to the mammoth/elephant splicing that was announced a year or two back?

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Headmaster

DNA half-life?

Really doesn't have any meaning in the traditional sense (i.e., radioactive decay). The stability of a molecule is going to vary greatly depending on environmental conditions. In sub-zero conditions, some studies have indicated DNA's "half-life" could be well over 100,000 years.

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Age

A-ha! This can't possibly be true. After all, the religious creationist nutters are quite adamant that the earth is only a few thousand years old and who would dare to disagree with that, for fear of being struck down by a thunderbolt or coming to a premature end, compelled to live in an oven for all eternity? (Snigger)

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Angel

Re: Age

You mock, but did you read how they died?

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Anonymous Coward

"resurrecting a dinosaur is out of the question"

Yes, but I fancy a change from horsemeat

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Go

Resurrecting dinos is out of the question.....

Then who is Megashark going to fight next??

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Re: Resurrecting dinos is out of the question.....

But I want a woolly mammoth, please.

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Of Apes and Men? Dinosaurs?

http://www.necn.com/04/11/13/Ancient-creature-mixed-human-apelike-tra/landing_scitech.html?&apID=ad866428c3ce44239b62189d1761851d

"NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists have gained new insights into an extinct South African creature with an intriguing mix of human and apelike traits, and apparently an unusual way of walking. But they still haven't pinned down where it fits on our evolutionary family tree.

It will take more fossil discoveries to sort that out.

The human branch of the evolutionary tree, called Homo, is thought to have arisen from a group of ancient species called australopithecines. The newly studied species is a member of this group, and so its similarities to humans are enticing for tackling the riddle of how Homo appeared.

It's called Australopithecus sediba (aw-STRAL-oh-PITH-uh-kus se-DEE-bah), which means "southern ape, wellspring." It lived some 2 million years ago, and it both climbed in trees and walked upright. Its remains were discovered in 2008 when the 9-year-old son of a paleoanthropologist accidently came across a bone in South Africa.

A 2011 analysis of some of A. sediba's bones showed a combination of human and more apelike traits, like a snapshot of evolution in action. That theme continues in six papers published online Thursday by the journal Science, which complete the initial examination of two partial skeletons and an isolated shinbone."

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Happy

Slight correction!

"which dated back to the Jurassic period and are 190 to 197 million years old." I think you'll find that should now be 190 to 197 million and three years old!

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