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back to article Nokia Life touches down in Kenya, jingles pocketful of Microsoft money

Nokia Life, the life services mobile app suite for the developing world, is launching the 18-pence-a-year service in Kenya, while Nokia throws another $250m into "the mobile ecosystem" elsewhere. The money goes to Nokia Growth Partners, Nokia's investment arm which has already made money out of Morpho, Inside Secure, Swype and …

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FAIL

Jesus Eadon

Do some homework. You won't find Windows Phone 8 (not even 7.x) on any of these handsets. Some of Nokia's *money* comes from Microsoft.

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Can't help yourself, can you?

It's an article mentioning Nokia and Microsoft, so I understand you have to bang that tired MS hate drum of yours.

However, this has nothing to do with WP8, or indeed Microsoft at all. Nokia Life works over SMS and is used mostly on low-end mobile phones. The 'more smart' devices the article refers to are the Asha phones. The mobile phones part of Nokia still makes profits and El Reg is creating tenuous assumptions about where Nokia / Microsoft's money gets punted around.

Isn't it funny how Windows Phone users generally have no problem with Android or iOS users, but you fanbois and fandroids have just gotta hate, haven't you?

Back to the article, Nokia Life sounds like a win all-round. I hope it rolls out further.

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Silver badge
Joke

Re: Can't help yourself, can you?

Isn't it funny how Windows Phone users generally have no problem with Android or iOS users, but you fanbois and fandroids have just gotta hate, haven't you?

This the Tribe Effect. If you are in a big strong tribe, you can be rude and mean about the other tribes, you've got plenty of homies to back you up.

However, if your tribe is small and feeble, then you have no-one to back you up, and hence you have to try to get along with everyone.

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Anonymous Coward

Could you tell me what's wrong with a massive company spending billions to get into a new market? You say it like we should instinctively know that it's wrong, but a company isn't going to get into a new market for free, are they?

How much did Ubuntu cost to make/setup? Is that spending wrong, or is it somehow different for Linux based companies.

You fairly regularly bang on about IBM, they seem to be your poster boy at the moment, but they spend a ton of cash advertising in order to enter new markets and maintain/expand their presence in others. Is it ok for them to do this, but not MS?

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Facepalm

For one thing, there's the matter of scale. Shuttleworth is bankrolling Ubuntu, but he has only about $500 million to play with. Microsoft has over $60 billion to use in any way as long as a regulator doesn't stop them.

For another thing, Microsoft rarely competes on the merits. They use unfair contracts and misleading advertising to spread into new markets. To develop a market, you need to spend time in it, iterating and improving your product, until you have something good. Most companies need to be profitable pretty early in this process, but Microsoft has demonstrated that they will lose billions of dollars to conquer a new market. It's exceedingly unfair to compete against a player using negative margins, and it has destroyed many innovative people.

IBM used to be the evil empire, so we used to hate them. Their management was incompetent, so they fell to morally neutral status a while ago.

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Marketshare

Not something you'll see Google providing, which is why Nokia will rule emerging markets much as it currently does new markets.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Marketshare

Think you forgot the <sarcasm> tag...

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Megaphone

Re: Marketshare

No, I didn't.

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Nokia's "Sugar Daddy" money

The business concept of buying friends and influencing people is limited in 2013, particularly if Nokia is attempting to buy "mobile device" sales in places like Kenya, where most of that cash will go into the pockets of corrupt politicians, and not to offer reasonably prices smartphones to citizen Kenyans.

It is sad that Nokia, as Microsoft's dupe is resorting to 1990s stale and ineffective tactics of their overlord that does not produce or offer superior products and services at very competitive rates. The company might just as well donate those funds to aids and HIV healthcare support in that troubled African Country.

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