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back to article Torygraph and Currant Bun stand by to repel freeloaders

The Daily Telegraph is to begin charging regular web readers for web access. The Telegraph doesn't use the term 'paywall' in its announcement, which is fair enough, really. The P-word is really a propaganda word, as the FT's M B Christie has pointed out: "Why don't we call it paying for content, just like paying for milk or …

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IT Angle

So how long till el reg hides behind a paywall?

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Trollface

Good question

...because it would be much more profitable with one, according to this article.

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Yes, that is a question. Given El Reg's (rightly) pointing out that not charging for content has been hugely damaging for newspapers going online, is it 1) experiencing the same* and 2) is it planning on charging for its news content?

*Probably none of my business, right?

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I'd pay 2 quid a month for el-reg withouth the ads, no question. Yes, yes, I know - AdBlock Plus, but it feels kind of stingy on here (unlike moronic sites like National Rail Enquiries where it is the only way to render the thing usable).

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Coat

More to the point, what's El Reg going to do for news,seeing as how it seems to get most of it's non-HiTech stories straight from the Telegraph's website?

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(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

"it seems to get most of it's non-HiTech stories straight from the Telegraph's website?"

How very dare you.

C.

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If The Reg does eventually plan on charging, could it at least start putting the author's name under the headline on the front page? I'd hate to waste any "free" allowance by inadvertently reading one of Orlowski's copyright-obsessed rants.

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Pint

Printing press

The Register, unlike the Daily Telegraph, hasn't got a loss making print operation to support. And I suspect that the staff count at The Register is considerably smaller than the Telegraph's. If that means the hacks at the Reg can still get a few beers like this one <--- on expenses then I see no risk of them putting up a paywall...

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And his climate-change denial-ism.He seem to think that fossil fuels can live forever.

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Unhappy

> (unlike moronic sites like National Rail Enquiries where it is the only way to render the thing usable)

Never tried reading el reg on a samsung galaxy then - it doesn't matter which URL you click on on the home page, you get the side-bar advert, 90% of the time.

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If The Reg does eventually plan on charging, could it at least start putting the author's name under the headline on the front page? I'd hate to waste any "free" allowance by inadvertently reading...

I like the current practice of not putting the author's name on the front page, but I'd agree if I had to pay by article.

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Paris Hilton

Paying for El Reg

I'd want a free gift, a El Reg tea mug or a wall calender with 12 of the best pics from the Playmobile reconstruction series, or something Paris-y at least!

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Windows

BBC for the headlines

Blogs for analysis?

I'll only buy content from Big News when it's in dead tree format.

The best thing about the new paywalls is that the guardian's comments section will be swamped with exiled right wing nut jobs too tight to pay a few quid a month to vent their spleen. Popcorn anyone?

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Re: BBC for the headlines

How will I tell the difference?

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Re: BBC for the headlines

It's also one step closer to the loss of (perceived) anonymity on the Internet. If papers push most of their content behind subscription systems, it becomes very easy to link a commentator to a verified credit card billing address.

Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes, I'm not convinced that this is a step in the right direction.

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Meh

Re: BBC for the headlines

"Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes, I'm not convinced that this is a step in the right direction."

And exactly how anonymous do you think the likes of you and I are on El Reg? We've given them a valid email address, and unless it is hosted in some East European sh1thole then the mail server operators would happily grass up the IP we're accessing the email from, which in fairly short order could have you named.

You could be accessing through multiple proxies, or from work servers (eg when I post from work it gets routed through a continental server), you could use all manner of fancy obfuscation, but I'll wager that you don't, and the incidental obfuscation of work postings and the like wouldn't save you.

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Holmes

Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

"mail server operators would happily grass up the IP we're accessing the email from, which in fairly short order could have you named."

So what? Simple solution: Never say anything online you wouldn't say to someone's face and never say anything to anyone anyway which you can not substantiate with facts. It's not rocket surgery, is it?

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Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

@El Presidente

That's great, until you factor in the notion of whisteblowers. And whether or not you think they're needed very often, it's not necessarily a net improvement to the world to make it impossible for someone to report dodgy dealings or actions without effectively standing up and saying "I, Joe Bloggs of 123 Fake Street, would like to bring to your attention the following criminal *ack ack argh*", shortly followed by a takedown notice on the basis that the post is defamatory and a news story a couple of days later about how Joe Bloggs of 123 Fake Street has been found dead with two bullet holes in the back of his skull, and the police believe it to be suicide, and Definitely Not Shady At All.

I do think that an awful lot of comment sections would be improved if the very small but non-zero probability existed that saying something objectionable might get you a real-world kick in the danglies. (But then, who gets to define "objectionable"? Back to square zero...)

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Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

"It's not rocket surgery, is it?"

No, and neither is it brain science...

Curious conundrum: most of the stuff we call rocket science is actually engineering.

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Re: BBC for the headlines

Easy solution:

Set up the email account in an internet cafe in a town you never visit. Actually, pay a random teenager to go into the internet cafe and set the account up for you. Have them also link the email to your new Register account and respond to the confirmation email while they're in there. Have them give you the Register account username/password. Pay them in alcohol that you bought in another town that you otherwise never visit. Wear a different disguise in each town and put on a silly voice when negotiating with the teenager. Make sure you pay them enough alcohol that they won't remember any of the Register or email account details. Never ever log into the email account.

Remember to use cash to pay for the alcohol and train tickets and don't get the cash out all at once, but just by withdrawing an extra tenner each time you use a cash machine for the preceeding few months. Launder the cash via two independent beuraux de change, converting it into a foreign curreny and back to ensure you end up with notes that don't bear your finger prints.

Simply repeat most of the above process each time you wish to post a new comment on the Register.

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Re: BBC for the headlines @El Presidente

Well, that's the problem. I agree with you, but making a joke about blowing something up is enough to get you arrested these days. Heaven forbid you say something factually correct but unpleasant about a wealthy person with a libel lawyer on speed-dial.

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Meh

Re: BBC for the headlines @El Presidente

"So what? Simple solution"

You seem to think I'm taking a view on on-line expression. In fact I was merely responding to the OP who commented that newspaper paywalls and associated comment forums would make the commentards more traceable, and for a very high percentage it won't make a blind bit of difference.

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Megaphone

Re: BBC for the headlines

Don't think you'll ever get a right-winger on the Guardian. The paper itself is £24 million in debt due to left-wingers preferring to troll right-wing media, fact.

On another point while people are knocking this I take it you left-wingers don't mind the BBC being behind a pay wall, the BBC TV Licence

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Pint

Re: BBC for the headlines @Ledswinger

"It's not rocket surgery, is it?". Perhaps not, but your simple solution is just impossible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THNPmhBl-8I

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@An0n C0w4rd

"Given how the UK police and security services (as well as our lovely friends in the USA) have over-reacted numerous times to innocent comments posted on the Intertubes,

How many times, actually?

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Alert

Re: BBC for the headlines

On another point while people are knocking this I take it you left-wingers don't mind the BBC being behind a pay wall, the BBC TV Licence

Oh I see, "paywall" is the new slang for taxation?

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Re: @An0n C0w4rd @ Turtle

Too many. Once is too many, and all I need to say is "Robin Hood Airport" to show that it happened too many times already.

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iPad app

"The Telegraph's iPad app is consistently the most buggy and the least reliable of all the UK newspaper apps, and lies in abject, barely-supported neglect".

More importantly, what's their Android App like? (seeing as Android has the larger market share).

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Re: iPad app

Some of us block Androids from accessing our sites anyway.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: iPad app

Well, the only person losing out there is you, John.

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Re: iPad app

<<<Some of us block Androids from accessing our sites anyway.>>>

Cool! Sending traffic and business to your competitors - what a nice guy!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: iPad app

The article doesn't mention the iPhone app either.

As far as I'm aware there isn't a dedicated Android Tablet App? Hence just talking about the iPad app I imagine.

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Re: iPad app

They aren't worth it. If they are using Adblock then they can merrily go somewhere else. It means nothing to me. As pointed out in the article catering to the "free" crowd is a failing venture unless you are doing some shady shit with date you collect. Why bother.

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Re: iPad app

Can somebody explain why you need a special application to read what is, at the end of the day, a collection of HTML pages?

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Re: iPad app

@Don Jefe

As pointed out by pretty much anyone who had to deal with "work only with IE" b.s. and knows about user-agent - it's NOT up to you to decide who's looking at your public website.

Hold a private viewing in your basement if you want control.

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Re: iPad app

Of course it is up to me... Why would you think it wasn't?

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Re: iPad app

Some of us don't give a shit about business and competitors. It ain't all about money.

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This is great news! And from a newspaper too for a change.

Fewer people will read their propagandist drivel.

More of this.

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Trollface

If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

Maybe next year eh ?

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Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

Will the Mail implode with even more self-righteous postings and be forced to go the same way?

No doubt there will be reduced rates for subbing to the Sun via Sky , less to confuse the little dears.

Will the Sun have special options -- one with all the news and gossip for the laydees and ine with just tits and sport for the geezers?

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FAIL

Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

Why would they need too. The DM is the most viewed online newspaper in the world. It really upsets the loony left lol

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Stop

Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

"The DM is the most viewed online newspaper in the world."

Mein Kampf sold very well in the 1930s and 1940s I believe.

Just for balance number 3 in The World is The Guardian.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: If only the Dailymail were to follow suit.

"Will the Sun have special options ..."

Wasn't that supposed to be an "advantage" of online content for a consumer? Your news and music feeds would be filtered to only the narrow spectrum of things you say you like. Choosing a single newspaper already sets an effective filter for style, viewpoint, and content. No doubt many regular readers then regard a large percentage of that as irrelevant to their tastes, needs, or desires.

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More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

I suppose I ought to sign up - I am beginning to think this country is run by the EU.

Hacker: Don't tell me about the press. I know exactly who reads the papers: the Daily Mirror is read by people who think they run the country; The Guardian is read by people who think they ought to run the country; The Times is read by people who actually do run the country; the Daily Mail is read by the wives of the people who run the country; the Financial Times is read by people who own the country; The Morning Star is read by people who think the country ought to be run by another country; and The Daily Telegraph is read by people who think it is.

Sir Humphrey: Prime Minister, what about the people who read The Sun?

Bernard: Sun readers don't care who runs the country, as long as she's got big tits.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_Minister

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Re: More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

An updated one for the young'uns using that newfangled Utub thing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbWiysSqKRA

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Happy

Re: More jet Spitfires? - Oh yes please!

The original is still the best:

http://youtu.be/DGscoaUWW2M

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Anonymous Coward

just remove cookies

Unless their new paywall implementation is better than their existing one, it's pretty easy to get around. When you've reached your limit and they nag you to pay you just remove the cookies from their site and start again.

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Re: just remove cookies

Cookies wont help if the system checks the IP

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Anonymous Coward

Re: just remove cookies

"Cookies wont help if the system checks the IP"

That only works if you have an IP address dedicated to one PC. Most home users have several PCs behind their IP address. That in turn may be a NAT shared with other customers. Business intranets have a lot of PCs multiplexed behind a small set of IP addresses.

Anyway Firefox by default erases cookies if you close the browser.

Probably the only way they will be able to try enforce the limit will be a mandatory registration even for free content.

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