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back to article No, really: Austrians develop hi-tech jewellery made out of concrete

A Viennese designer has just snagged a prestigious international award for his new line of jewellery, which uses a new high-tech process to fashion the ornaments out of concrete. Can it be that I hold here in my mortal hands ... a lump of purest grey? "Concrete has incredibly beautiful aesthetics. As a material it can do a lot …

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Silver badge

Nothing new.

Swimming pools, sailboats, garden gnomes, faux waterfalls ... Same process. Gaudy gunnite (shotcrete, if you prefer ...), mostly coveted by folks with absolutely no taste.

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Re: Something new.

Only two questions: do they make a Prince Albert and will the added weight increase the length of the shaft?

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Re: Something new.

IIRC the article said this stuff is lighter so it look s like you'll have to stick to the traditional method of pinning it to your trouser leg.

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Re: Nothing new.

"Swimming pools, sailboats, garden gnomes, faux waterfalls ..>"

Concrete jewelry has been around a while too.

"mostly coveted by folks with absolutely no taste."

Concrete can look spectacular, it can look shit and probably everything in-between - eye of the beholder and all that. To its credit, at least its not prone to making sweeping generalizations.

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Devil

Re: Something new.

1 - you do *not* want *any* piercing jewellery made out of concrete. Metal is available in some eyewatering gauges and 316L is heavy.

2 - I'm sure it does, but as the quote famously has it, "the shaft stretched twice as long is half as wide". Swings and roundabouts, dear boy.

(Icon is howling in pain)

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Happy

Ah, Austrians and metal reinforced concrete

A match made in heaven?

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Silver badge

Seems like a waste of palladium to me

Much better uses for it than sat on someone's finger.

Personally, I'd rather be able to breathe the air than look at a shiny thing made artificially dull by spray-on concrete.

I'd be happier if they used man-made Pd though, "forged in a nuclear furnace" seems likely to be a selling point in this market, given the crazy "so hard to manufacture" talk that always comes with designer jewellery.

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Meh

Not surprising

The Austrians were experts at the manufacture of concrete, look how many bunkers they manufactured during WW2.

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Windows

Build one out of

pykrete. Thats impressive...

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Re: Build one out of

" Build one out of pykrete. " - that's COOL !

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@Chemist (was: Re: Build one out of)

One off the wrist might be an issue, though ...

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Re: @Chemist (was: Build one out of)

Well I see what you mean !

By the way has anyone read the book " Pyke : The Unknown Genius" or some similar title

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Anonymous Coward

It's probably okay once set, but when it is setting concrete can cause burns.

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Facepalm

I rather suspect...

...they let it set before trying to polish it.

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What's Next?

Concrete Shoes?

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Re: What's Next?

The mafia already fits people for concrete shoes. So happy are the clients that you never see or hear from them again. I hear that people fitted with concrete shoes are somehow able to sleep with the fishes.

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Re: What's Next?

To summarize: http://bit.ly/16TkttR

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Anonymous Coward

Re: What's Next?

Yes, those concrete shoes last the rest of your life!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: What's Next?

A Polish submarine.

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Headmaster

It's not 'supported by'

Structural reinforced concrete isn't simply "supported on an underlying metal structure" - the steel is required to provide tensile capacity and form a composite material. The lever arm between the allowable compressive force in the concrete and the tensile force in the steel then provides bending capacity.

Similarly, reinforced concrete columns require both longitudinal and transverse reinforcement to both increase the direct axial compression carrying capacity, and to provide tensile reinforcement against the bursting forces generated by the Poisson effect (i.e. "cream-caking").

It's not like you can take away the steel once the concrete has cured. Bad things tend to happen if you try.

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Re: It's not 'supported by'

"It's not like you can take away the steel once the concrete has cured. Bad things tend to happen if you try."

Or if the steel melts. Refer to "Towers, Twin" for details....

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Thumb Down

A bit disappointed, actually

I was expecting to see concrete jewellery, not regular jewellery with sprayed-on mumbo-jumbo-make-it-sound-special rebar.

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Boffin

Re: A bit disappointed, actually

Me too, especially as I recall an article in New Scientist 2 or 3 decades ago introducing us to high strength un-reinforced concrete. By using a carefully controlled mixture of very fine aggregate the inventors were, for example, able to make coil springs for car suspension out of concrete. So I expected all or most of the jewellery to be made of concrete.

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Vic
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Re: A bit disappointed, actually

> able to make coil springs for car suspension out of concrete

I've seen a concrete record. It worked. That was over 30 years ago.

There's not so much new stuff here, from what I can see.

Vic.

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So what does it actually look like?

What I'd like to see is some nice close up colour pictures to see what it actually looks like. Those are very pretty arty shots, but ultimately concrete is mineral grains in a matrix... If all those grains are highly polished I can imagine the resulting effect as being rather decorative - each different mineral grain reflecting separately...

I can then go on to visualise the same effect with something rather exotic as the mineral grains. For the really affluent how about diamond, ruby and sapphire grains in a metallic matrix? They must be reasonably available as residue from the process of cutting gem stones I should have thought...

Or is my imagination just leaping way beyond what this stuff would actually look like?

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Re: So what does it actually look like?

I'm thinking diamond/ruby/sapphire dust in some kind of polished epoxy.

Now that's an idea.

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Re: So what does it actually look like?

Sounds like my ceramic tile and stone/brick saws.

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Pint

Austrian v Australian

Call that a ring?

[bottle opener ring]

Now that's a ring!

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Paris Hilton

Concrete council tower blocks are a girl's best friend!

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Thumb Up

Can it be that I hold here in my mortal hands ... a lump of purest grey?

Thumbs up for the Blackadder reference.

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Bronze badge

This is silly.

1. They get a super-expensive precious metal, but hide most or all of it from view. You might as well use steel!

2. If it does catch on, you'll find a hundred factories open making knock-offs that do use steel. And it'll be impossible to tell them apart without destroying the jewelry.

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Coat

Re: This is silly.

Indeed, the knock-offs will be an absolute steal at about 10% of the price!

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