back to article Oracle acquires Nimbula, buys way into open clouds

Oracle has announced plans to acquire Nimbula, an purchase that gives the database company a route into the open source OpenStack cloud management system, and a private cloud software stack as well. The strategic buy was announced on Wednesday morning by a brief statement posted on Nimbula and Oracle's websites. Nimbula builds …

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Devil

Atom Heart Larry

....Nimbula's technology "is complementary to Oracle"

For about half a day, then it ignominiously is left to fall under the table where it dies of dehydration, shackled and forgotten.

Why that devil icon comes in Oracle Colors. Great!

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Anonymous Coward

How do Oracle still sell anything?

They still don't even recognise virtualisation in their licensing model!

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Anonymous Coward

Are you just saying the same propaganda comment against every Oracle story?

http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2013/03/13/oracle_cloud/

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Anonymous Coward

virtualisation in their licensing

Actually they do. At least on the Solaris SPARC side with zones and LDOMs. They were one of the original vendors to support zones when Sun first came out with them (way before Oracle bought Sun). You can also do it on the mainframe side with LPARs.

To my knowledge they do not support resource capping on VMware, but we have a fair amount of vendors that also do not support it on vmware but do on other platforms.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: virtualisation in their licensing

Erm so they support the concept of virtualisation only on a legacy, disinvest platform that they own. They don't on things people actually use like Hyper-V, VMware, etc. Good luck with that at the low and medium end of the market where people want to virtualise versus SQL server.....And cloud? How many public clouds run on Solaris, lol?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: virtualisation in their licensing

Disinvest? That's simple nonsense. SPARC is getting huge amounts of investment. Try talking to Oracle, instead of parroting propaganda from its competitors.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: virtualisation in their licensing

Sparc is only getting investment from people who need to update legacy stacks and CBA to migrate to Windows or Linux. Its not strategic or cost effective as far as any other technology leaders I talk to are concerned; it's a solution of last resort. The same as their database stack - See:

Information Technology Intelligence Consulting's October 2011 survey of more than 450 respondents found that Oracle products received the lowest ratings for quality of service and support of any of the major vendors. Half -- 50 percent of ITIC survey participants -- said that Oracle hardware reliability had worsened over the last two years, and 18 percent of Oracle customers gave the company "poor" and "unsatisfactory" ratings for technical service, support, and product warranties on server hardware.

Only 1 percent said Oracle support had "improved significantly." Only 32 percent of respondents gave Oracle an "excellent" or "very good" rating for product performance, service and support. This is in sharp contrast to the 85 percent of survey participants who gave rivals IBM (85 percent), HP (76 percent) and Dell (70 percent) "excellent" and "very good" marks for their hardware product performance, service and support.

In Oracle's core competency, databases, Microsoft's SQL Server scored significantly higher satisfaction ratings among survey respondents. More than 80 percent of participants gave Microsoft SQL Server "excellent" or "very good" ratings, compared to the 43 percent that gave the Oracle DB an "excellent" or "very good" rating.

And

Computer Economics surveyed 109 users in late 2010 for its "Go-Forward Strategies for Oracle Application Customers." The results indicate 42 percent of respondents were unhappy with the quality of Oracle support, while a 58 percent majority were dissatisfied with the cost of Oracle support.

"Our Sun support has become even more abysmal since crazy Larry purchased them -- hard to believe," said a network administrator at a large healthcare organization with 250 servers.

An IT Manager at a midsized manufacturing firm was equally distressed by Oracle's moves since acquiring Sun: "Since Oracle bought-out Sun, the future of Solaris is extremely dim if not already gone. IT departments that have invested heavily in SPARC/Solaris servers are going to have significant issues once it is no longer supported. Inevitably, this will lead to server reliability issues as the deprecated Sun hardware ages," the IT manager said.

Many organizations, including his own, had "dropped a small fortune to be able to run Solaris on its native RISC platform," he added -- and in so doing, they expected continuing enhancements and improvements to the product line. "So much for that," the IT manager said. "Companies will have a very difficult time being able to part with these premium-priced boat anchors when the time comes, and it will be sooner than later."

Many of the ITIC survey respondents said they were already moving from the Oracle SPARC and Solaris platforms.

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Thumb Down

Really? We get to over-pay for another VULNERABLE product.

Just what I need, another product that can't inter-operate with their other products. Please Larry...Make old versions of java a requirement for this product too!!!

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Well.....

Not overly sure what Numbula did, but farewell, was nice knowing you.

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Silver badge
Devil

Why so many anonymous cowards? Do you people fear that Larry Ellison will personally blow subsonic hollowpoints with "AC" written on them into each of your sorry arses?

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Close shave

Oracle already bulldozed two technologies I used to use, luckily, for me I didn't pick Nimbula.

Buying in to tech developed by start-ups is like playing Russian Roulette, esp when Oracle is the Borging entity.

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