back to article Redmond slashing Win8, Office OEM rates for small devices

Microsoft is reportedly offering its OEM partners discounted rates on its Windows 8 and Office 2013 software, in a move designed to encourage production of more Windows-powered tablets and ultraportables. As to just how low Redmond is willing to go, however, and what kinds of devices qualify for the discounts, reports vary. …

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despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

If they had included a "default to desktop with start menu" option (no some 3rd party fix) I might be intrested. But as it is I would not give them 50 cents for their Frankenstine in a dress Operating system.

I just had to RDP into a machine to fix something and I was about ready to shoot something.

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Headmaster

Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

Quite how you used "Reliable Datagram Protocol" to remote to a PC is beyond me.

Terminal Services is not RDP!

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Holmes

Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

Pedantic and wrong.

Terminal Services is the.. service (the hint is in the name) that Microsoft give to the service which accepts remote connections.

'Remote Desktop Connection' application from Microsoft (sitting on my Win7 task-bar right now) is the application that makes connections (the hint is in the name) to a machine running Terminal Services via the Remote Desktop Protocol.

So the original poster was quite correct. They RDP'd to a box in the same way we FTP files - using a File Transfer Protocol. The actual client and server details are unimportant, compared to the protocol being used.

And while I haven't had to RDP to a W8 box yet (on the basis that I am actually yet to see a Win8 box actually being used), I can just imagine it would indeed be rage inducing.

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Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

@ GrantB

Pedantic - maybe.

Wrong - Not.

RDP: See RFC 908 (1984)

"MS" RDP is a proprietary protocol running over port 3389 (Terminal Services)

My keyboard is probably older than you. I hate revisionist twats.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

" RDP: See RFC 908 (1984)

"MS" RDP is a proprietary protocol running over port 3389 (Terminal Services) "

You made an assumption about which protocol he was talking about and were supercilious about it. The assumption was incorrect - you were indeed wrong. The old "But but but <insert reference to RFC here>" routine just makes you look like a dick who can't accept having his errors pointed out to him. Or, indeed, accept that he's made them. The biggest problem you have here, I think, is that you let your desire to be a pedant blind you to context. The revisionist twats comment is just childish.

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Headmaster

Dr Frankenstein

Dr Victor Frankenstein was the creator of the monster and not the monster referred to in Mary Shelley's classic.

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Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

Pedants really need to remind themselves that MS have a long history of giving new names to old things, so they can 'own' them. Bring your MS<->rest of world phrase book to any MS story.

It's a practice IBM pioneered... so another thing MS didn't invent but 'borrowed' ;)

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Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

Yes, this is clearly the first time in the history of computing that a TLA has been recycled so it's perfectly reasonable to jump into the stance you've picked with both feet </sarcasm>

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Re: Dr Frankenstein

True. Are you saying that Dr Frankenstein looked good in a dress?

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Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

El Reg really needs a shovel icon!

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Re: despite Microsoft offering customers deep discounts on Windows 8 upgrades

The revisionist twats comment is just childish.

But worth every penny.

Oh, and I'm not anonymous. You twat.

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Linux

Windows RT has not exactly been a resounding success...

Not suprised, RT is basically the bastard child and no use to anyone.. Consumers are not interested cause they can get Android tablets for 50% the cost, while it useless for business as it can't be joined to a domain.

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Re: Windows RT has not exactly been a resounding success...

And you can get an Atom based Windows 8 tablet with similar performance, same battery life and all Windows software available...

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Re: Windows RT has not exactly been a resounding success...

The domain thing surprised the heck out of me. Microsoft are playing catch-up and by throwing away domain membership and the manageability that comes with it, they're throwing away one of the areas where they hold an advantage with business and education customers. This product was designed to fail.

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Well MSFT needs some $$$ to...

...pay for the advert that has all the kids dancing around clicking keyboards to slabs. Last I looked the commercial touts that and the fact you can flip from screen to screen.

Not much else is shown (could it be that you can't much else?).

If you want to do any "real" work on a W8 slab, you might as well get a lappy (which is what many have already decided I suspect).

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Re: Well MSFT needs some $$$ to...

"you might as well get a lappy" - and this is what it comes down to.

Developers and geeks don't really do tablets. Yes, we may tinker a bit, but to actually do anything of meaningful value, you need a "proper machine".

Managers are the people who do tablets in a big way. And since they're all about swanking it up in front of their peers, they need to be seen as "cool".

And Microsoft has not been cool for a long time - too much muddy water under that bridge.

The only way Microsoft has into the tablet market is the long game - make something a bit different that eventually proves to be as good an option (if not better) than everything else. At this point in time, it's difficult to see how the Surface may be that device.

I'm not saying that Microsoft should dump the Surface - not yet at any rate. But by rushing to try and grab a slice of the slab/phone action, they've gone off half-cocked with a desktop OS that is a bit too different and lacking in key familiar features, and a mobile counterpart that could have used a bit more thought.

Personally, I hope it catches on (eventually) - I've got a nasty feeling that a Google-controlled IT monopoly would be even worse than Microsoft...

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Hmmm

While Iagree the RT version of Windows 8 doesn't seen set up for business and to expensive for home use compared to android or even ios devices, I'm not even sure win 8 as a full x86/64 system works for business as you can't add anything app-wise to the touchy-feely side of it without a Microsoft account, which I'm sure we'll go down well in business.

As a personal OS it's not too bad, but the fact you need to integrate everything to as hotmail or live account is quite annoying, but gets really irritating when installed as a test machine on a domain.

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Re: Hmmm

Shortly before Christmas, I set up a laptop a friend got for her ~10-year-old daughter. The mother wanted it to be ready for her out of the box so she didn't have to configure it, aside from adding a few personal accounts. The OEM had included several Windows Store apps that weren't their own, but I found absolutely no way to install other things she would use without tying it to a Microsoft account. I tried a few Google searches but found nothing relevant.

It's not as if I wanted to pirate anything - the apps were all freeware. I just wanted to pre-install the Windows Store version of Skype, the Amazon Kindle application to complement her Kindle Fire, a few game demos, the freeware Microsoft games, and a few other things. Yeah, that didn't happen. I ended up installing the desktop version of Skype and tried to make Metro as easy to use for her as possible, grouping things like Office and removing uninstall links that got dumped to the start screen.

So far, she's not had any troubles with it. It seems kids are more willing to adapt to new things than adults though.

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Re: Hmmm

> So far, she's not had any troubles with it. It seems kids are more willing to adapt to new

> things than adults though.

Yes, a child might think Windows 8 is fine. But I suspect their needs and perspective might be a little different from an adult with years of experience performing real productive work...

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Boffin

Re: Hmmm

@ACcc

you can't add anything app-wise to the touchy-feely side of it without a Microsoft account

Businesses which happen to be MS shops can host their own app stores in System Center(sic).

Details here.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj822984.aspx

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Trollface

Re: Hmmm

downvoted because Eadon?

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FAIL

..verry funny article...

..I laughed the most when it said "the full power of windows".....

i used Window 8 today for the first time and it made me laugh like a drain at the poor arsehole who was almost in tears just trying to find somewhere he could type "cmd".....

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Re: ..verry funny article...

Now I despise Microsoft as much as the next man, but your comment really takes the biscuit.....

It's rather akin to the poor arsehole trying to make a cup of tea who was in tears because the gas cooker wouldn't fill his kettle with water.

Eadon datchoo?

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Re: ..verry funny article...@ Neil.

Have you used TIFKAM? particularly on a nontouch PC? There are so many fundamental interface/UI fails it beggars belief.

To extend the gas cooker analogy...TIKFAM is a gas cooker that has the main ignite control hidden down the side of the cooker, the gas control dials are hidden under flaps, which themselves have no visible means of operation, and you can only use one hob at a time, unless you lift up the cooker top surface, and attach your own hobs underneath. And there are absolutely no labels or instructions on anything.

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Re: ..verry funny article...

Hate to say it, but Old Painless has a point.

I installed Win8 a while back. Personally, I don't mind using it (although my machine does have a nasty tendency to crash every now and then while in hibernation), but without the keyboard and desktop shortcuts, I can see how it would get very frustrating, very quickly.

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Re: ..verry funny article...

can't find command prompt?

right click in the bottom right corner. Honestly if you can't work out some of the shortcuts just because you cannot spend five minutes on google then ... well I don't need to finish that sentence. Every iteration of every operating system comes with new tools, new shortcuts, and new omissions, just spend a while doing some research and people can stop whining.

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Re: ..verry funny article...

The point is that if you *have* to spend five minutes on google to figure out how to do basic tasks because the interface is so user-hostile, then that's a problem.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: ..verry funny article...@ Neil.

Works fine for me - took me about 10 minutes to find how to access everything I needed and discover all the different menu options on Win8. My young kids have no issues either. Maybe you should stick to a CLI based gas cooker?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: ..verry funny article...

Crash in hibernation in Win8 = update your BIOS.

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FAIL

Re: ..verry funny article...

funny you should mention research.

Here's what the professional UI researchers have to say:

"The situation is much worse on regular PCs, particularly for knowledge workers doing productivity tasks in the office. This used to be Microsoft's core audience, and it has now thrown the old customer base under the bus by designing an operating system that removes a powerful PC's benefits in order to work better on smaller devices.

The underlying problem is the idea of recycling a single software UI for two very different classes of hardware devices. It would have been much better to have two different designs: one for mobile and tablets, and one for the PC.

I understand why Microsoft likes the marketing message of "One Windows, Everywhere." But this strategy is wrong for users."

http://www.nngroup.com/articles/windows-8-disappointing-usability/

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free copies of Office 2013

that would a free copy of the product that can only EVER be installed on ONE device ONCE and never ever again. Mad, just mad.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: free copies of Office 2013

Please do try to keep up. MS have put their tails between their legs on that one, too.

Maybe's MS's next desperation move will be to copy Apple's desperation watchaPod.

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FAIL

Re: free copies of Office 2013

You keep up. The copy you get with a new PC is not covered by that revision.

"The license terms for OEM copies of Office that are purchased with a new PC remain unchanged; OEM copies cannot be transferred except with the PC itself."

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Re: free copies of Office 2013

You keep up. The copy you get with a new PC is not covered by that revision.

Which is fair enough when talking about OEM copies supplied with hardware, of course the software should be tied to the hardware. You can re-install the software too, as often as you like, just restore the system image. On the same hardware.

However buying Office separately is a completely different kettle of fish, and Microsoft have now done the sensible thing and revised their licensing terms for standalone purchases.

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FAIL

Re: free copies of Office 2013

The "OEM copies supplied with hardware" is still paid for by the user.

Restoring the system image will lose every change you have made to the system since first delivery. Or are you proposing making a full system image weekly or daily to compensate for dumb MS policies/ In any case hardware still fails outside of warranty and with the OEM version of Office you are screwed.

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Samsung cancels WIndows RT tablet in Europe

due to lack of interest - not sure this move will help much.

the verge.com

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Anonymous Coward

"For its part, Microsoft has remained mum, with a spokesman offering only, "As we've said before, Windows 8 was built to scale across all sizes of PCs and tablets – large and small. We continue to work with partners to ensure that Windows is available across a diverse range of devices.""

Queue the lawsuits; price fixing, monopolistic practices, etc.

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Anonymous Coward

HHopefullyy MS is listening (and learning) and will offer something by SP1.

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FAIL

Retreat on all fronts

Office, Windows, Azure downtime. Bing going nowhere. Windows Phone dropping share to 3%. Is anything clicking right for them anywhere?

Meanwhile Apple's selling more devices per day than all of the Windows ecosystem vendors, and the sum of Android vendors is doing over twice that.

Somewhere in Redmond a tall sweaty man needs a hug.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Retreat on all fronts

Actually Windows Phone market share of sales has climbed to 6% - http://crave.cnet.co.uk/mobiles/windows-phone-snatches-uk-sales-from-android-50010517/

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Windows

Re: Windows Cash Cow on death row

MS competed with its partners because its partners had not made any innovative AND good hardware for years (apart from Asus, coming up with new and successful form factors like eeePC and Transformer).

It must have been so sad for MS to see the bloated, slow moving and unmotivated PC makers do such a shite job while Apple was able to control things themselves and produce attractive hardware that people could fall in love with. I'm not surprised they wanted to motivate (embarrass) their industry by showing them how it's possible to innovate on their first attempt at a hybrid (whether you like it or not, the Surface is novel). It's not a betrayal, it's a kick up the backside, a "could do better".

With partners like that, who needs enemies? I hope most of the old players fail, leaving a handful of innovators producing compelling products (Samsung, Asus, MS themselves, and someone else).

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Re: Windows Cash Cow on death row

@nordwars - This is called blame the victim. These victims know what's coming for them now if they don't develop a Plan B. Hence the HP Chromebook and Android Slate 7.

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Silver badge

Re: Windows Cash Cow on death row

Disregarding the last comment about public feeling towards TIFKAM...

I agree.

Microsoft's model cannot work in the current environment - the market has moved on as it always does, and they must adapt to survive or die.

It feels like there has been a lot of panic-driven decisions - a sudden realisation of the market shift, followed by an "oh shit" reaction to try and grab a slice of the action. But there have been a few "right moves" as well - Android support for Azure, endorsement of Monogame for example.

Despite their... colourful history, Microsoft can still live to fight another day - but not as we know them now. And there's a lot of work they need to do - starting right now - if they're going to achieve it.

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IT Angle

Re: Windows Cash Cow on death row

"1) Windows too fat and power hungry to run on cheap hardware"

Windows 2000 ran nicely even with 64MB of RAM. What went wrong?? :)

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Happy

Windows 9 here we come

They're going to have to make it not do stupid stuff when you swipe the trackpad, a trackpad is not a touchscreen so the gestures make no sense.

They're going to have to fix the UI abortion when not using the touchscreen in desktop mode (bring back the Start menu, etc...).

They're going to have to have another sit down and think about how context switching works (probably just run TIFKAM apps on the desktop unless the device is in tablet profile).

And they're going to have to have to do the opposite for Windows RT - unnobble domains, enable the desktop mode for more than just Office, allow any ARM compiled apps to run Windows RT, maybe put in an x86 emulator for legacy apps.

That's the problem they got themselves into as they marketed Windows as one thing across two different device profiles and two different architectures and they've now got to deliver on that promise. Had they marketed Windows RT under another name and thought a little more about how Windows 8 should work they wouldn't be in this mess.

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