Feeds

back to article Google in the dock over elephant ivory ads

Google has been accused of inadvertently promoting the slaughter of endangered whale and elephant species after environmentalists found tens of thousands of ads for ivory and other products on its Japanese shopping site. Non-profit campaigning group the Environmental Investigation Agency said that despite Google’s own “laudable …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Silver badge
Pirate

Scientific research?

So is this related to Japan's needless slaughter of whales in the Southern Ocean?

Asshats!

1
0
Silver badge

Anti hunting hypothesis

What would happen if someone could flood the market with cheap imitation ivory? Would it be possible to devalue ivory to the point that it wouldn't be worth the hunter's time?

0
0
Bronze badge
Joke

Re: Anti hunting hypothesis

Yeah i was thinking of exactly the same about rhino horn since its essentially hair you could make a fortune from your local hair dressers waste cuttings if you matted it together into a horn shape and flogged it to the asian markets

0
0
Silver badge

Re: Anti hunting hypothesis

If it was that easy, someone (or lots of someones) in China would already be doing that.

0
0
Bronze badge
Devil

Re: Anti hunting hypothesis

What makes you think they're not doing it?

I remember having this argument years ago, about antique ivory. If the elephant was killed 100 years ago, surely it's not encouraging the hunting of animals now?

But the trouble is, all it does is divide the market. If you invent near-perfect fake ivory, now there's an exclusive, expensive market for real ivory, and a lower-class, more mass market for the fake stuff, plus of course a fraudulent market for the fake being passed off as real ivory. And now you've created plausible deniability for the trader ("It's fake ivory, nothing wrong with that" when talking to the authorities, but the opposite story when talking to customers).

But the rich customers will still want the real thing, and they'll go to great lengths to get it. Think the sort of people who buy 'wild salmon' or 'real caviar'. Some of them will be genuinely able to tell the difference. Others won't, but will still want the real thing to impress those who can.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.