Feeds

back to article 4G operators move into new homes in the spectrum 'hood

Bidders in the UK's spectrum auction have now sorted out who's going where, and who's going to knock out our TV reception once the 4G networks get switched on. There were two bits of spectrum auctioned off: the low-frequency 800MHz band, which was freed up when analogue terrestrial TV was switched off, and the higher-frequency 2 …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
WTF?

Now did Three pick that block or did the other ops dig deep into their wallets in order to put three in the most painful spot?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

If you don't know much about Radio Frequency Digital communications you shouldn't post comments on the matter. Three already has spectrum in the 2.1 GHz band for Data. It is struggling to provide services in rural environments and hence the 800 MHz spectrum is ideal for that.

0
6
Facepalm

and you shouldn't post if you can't read.

I am aware of why they got the low frequency block, but not why the sort order came out with three nearest to the TV frequencies.

4
0
Silver badge

and so will likely suffer more than the rest

Three suffer?

No, the poor viewer that doesn't know what's wrong will suffer.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: and so will likely suffer more than the rest

Three's service wont interfere with Freeview.

The only ones who will suffer are EE who are suffering from envy.

0
2
Silver badge

Re: and so will likely suffer more than the rest

I've got it. You're Eadon's brother and you're a 3fan with an irrational dislike of EE. It's to be expected that this sort of thing runs in families.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: and so will likely suffer more than the rest

Envy for what? EE have more spectrum than three...

0
0
M7S
Bronze badge

For those of us less technical.....

....assuming that the relevant mobild carriers will operate in my area, does this mean just a retune of our current freeview kit or its possible obsolesence? I ask simply as I'd been about to splash out on a TV, possibly spending extra for an integral Freeview HD tuner and want to know if it might all need to be replaced or supplemented sooner than I'd normally hope for.

Thanks in advance for any reasoned guidance.

0
0

Re: For those of us less technical.....

If you buy something with integrated freeview HD then you're sorted for the time being. The only time this issue is likely to arise is if you're using an amplifier on your TV antenna. If you are using an amplifier, stop because it most likely isn't doing you any good at all unless it's on the mast or you're using it for distribution.

0
0
Boffin

Re: For those of us less technical.....

Opt for an LCD TV (not plasma!) with a DVB-T2 receiver and native 1920x1080 resolution, then you can receive High Definition - assuming your local transmitter is supporting it?!

There are a couple of ways you can experience interference, other than the usual blocking and pausing (my aerial is a mere 2.5km from Sandy Heath, which transmits 220kW, yet my TV and DVR still experience drop-outs!). If a 4G operator enables a tower (or builds a tower) that your aerial can see, the powerful signal (I say powerful - it's all relative to the power of your local TV transmitter(s)) may blind your receiver to the TV transmitter. Yagi aerials (used for TV) typically have a +/- 15 degree acceptance angle, so even if it is pointed dead-on to the TV transmitter, a nearby tower within the 'acceptance angle' could still cause a problem. Think of trying to look at a torch in the distance whilst some yob shines a laser in your eyes.

The other problem could come from a nearby 4G tower in your local area. As we are talking about milli-metric wavelengths (a quarter-wave at 800MHz is ~93mm), there is always the possibility of pick-up on the co-axial cable, or the aerial itself; even if it's pointing in the other direction.

Both of the problems above can be exacerbated by a wide-band aerial (possibly fitted to cover both analogue and digital transmissions) and/or an amplifier-splitter. Aerial amplifiers are often wide-band, covering Band II VHF (87.5 - 108.5MHz), Band III DAB (220 - 240MHz), and both Band IV and Band V TV (400 - 800MHz). A strong 4G signal could overload the amplifier and cause it to parasitically oscillate (poorly designed models can do that all of their own accord!). Result: no signal!

We have no real way of knowing if the 4G roll-out will affect few, or many. As Ofcom have no technical expertise, and have farmed out domestic radio and TV interference problems to the BBC, I am sure people are going to be left scratching their heads staring at a black mirror.

I hope you found this reasoned guidance?

73

Gary M0PLT

CBer and non-bearded Radio Amateur.

2
0
Bronze badge
Stop

Re: For those of us less technical.....

You seem to have confused this comments section with SlashDot, or one of the other tech sites.

Less well informed and articulated comments and more poorly researched cutnpaste rubbish from wikipedia please @The Electron.

1
0
Bronze badge
Mushroom

Re: For those of us less technical.....

Eh? There is lots of badly-researched, knee-jerk rubbish posted on Slashdot already, so no reason to pollute El Reg with the same.

0
0

Apples and Pears

Three are also more likely to suffer from interfence from TV equipment. And despite the fact that the TV broadcasts will bleed into Mobile more than vice-versa it will be the mobile companies that get the blame...

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.