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back to article Ancient lost continent discovered lounging on Mauritian beach

Fragments of an ancient microcontinent lie beneath holiday destinations Mauritius and Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean, experts say. The pair of isles are thought to sit on top of the hidden continent, dubbed Mauritia by scientists. The boffins believe the splinter of buried land became a separate landmass 60 million years ago …

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Can I get paid for "examining the sand" on a tropical beach for a few years, please?

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More likely you'll find that someone else on a higher paygrad grabs a bag full of sand and you spend a few years counting zircon grains.

Me? Bitter? Never.

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Joke

No, but there's an opening for research into Doggerland ....

Come to Skegness, it's so bracing!

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Joke

Re: Ancient lost continent discovered lounging on Mauritius beach

Its all right for the old ones,

Our generation aren't ever going to get the kind of pension that will allow lounging about on a beach in Mauritius.

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Alert

Snake oil on troubled waters

Cue the rush for books, posters, blogs, websites, DVD's etc.etc. about the 'REAL' Atlantis.

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Gondwana

The article conflates two supercontinents. Gondwana is the southern fragment of the Pangaea supercontinent, not part of Rodinia.

And Mantle plumes are only thought to be a partial explanation for continental breakup. They also appear to disintegrate when they get too big as the Mantle beneath their interiors becomes increasingly insulated, making them weaker. At the same time, large oceanic plates eventually cool and begin to subduct, pulling the continental plate apart.

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Paris Hilton

Re: Gondwana

Strictly they were all part of Rodinia as it was a previous supercontinent that significantly predates Pangaea...

But yeah, the article was confused and frankly whatever press release this lot and the beeb have picked up on was probably equally as confused because Rodinia was supposed to have broken up about 750 million years ago, not 80, so this landmass was likely also part of the other supercontinent(s) in between.

It probably sounds boring if you just say "sunken landmass with rock dating from Proterozoic times discovered".

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Re: Gondwana

The age of the zircon grains puts them in Rodinia. But the final breakup was of Gondwana.

As others have said, a confused Reg report.

But it is a part of their science coverage - El Reg is more than a computer trade paper. In my opinion (phrase inserted for legal CYA) their science coverage is less dumbed down than the BBC and infinitely more understanding than the Telegraph.

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Coat

Re: Gondwana

"Rock found in ocean."

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IT Angle

IT?

I can't think how this has even the most tenuous link to IT? Is El Reg just copying articles from the BBC now?

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Pint

Re: IT?

In my experience the copying is in the other direction.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: IT?

Sand is made of Silicon, perhaps??

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Re: IT?

Take three materials: silica, silicon, silicone.

Take three products: breast implants, concrete, transistors.

How many science correspondents in our great British Press can get the right material with the right product?

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Re: IT?

I now have a picture in my mind of extremely heavy, electrically controlled breast implants. Thank you.

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Joke

I bet it'll be blamed on global warming.

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Coat

I thought

Atlantis in the Atlanic (Maybe it's Ireland!) and Lemuria is the one in the Indian ocean.

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Joke

Re: I thought

If Atlantis was Ireland, where would have gone all the civilisation?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: I thought

The best documentary on Atlantis I saw was the idea that it was Thera/Santorini (in the Med). Worth a watch - think it was on the Beeb, but can't remember.

No space aliens involved either.

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Coat

Re: I thought

Timewatch: Atlantis - The Evidence, with Bettany Hughes. Was on iPlayer a couple of weeks ago, not sure if it still is.

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Re: I thought

http://www.bbc.co.uk/i/sl29f/

yes i'm bored

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Down to the pub, of course.

For a regular Irish Saturday Night...

drinking...

darts...

and drinking...

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The boffins did not say whether the lost continent was that of Atlantis, Mu or Lemuria.

Because that would have been very silly.

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Mu and Lemuria

Atlantis was in the Atlantic, and Mu is just another name for Lemuria - in the Pacific, at least according to James Churchward.

However, the original Lemuria, hypothesized by Haeckel, was in the Indian Ocean, so I guess that's what a lost continent abutting Madagascar would have to be. And Madagascar is where the last surviving population of lemurs is.

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Alien

Re: Mu and Lemuria

But lemurs don't yell "Tekeli-Li" while owning you with ruguous yet squamous tentacular appendages.

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Black Helicopters

Re: Mu and Lemuria

They might. Just because you haven't seen them do it doesn't mean they don't.

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Black Helicopters

Re: Mu and Lemuria

The top level domain for Mauritius is .mu.

Is that really just a coincidence or ...

+++ No carrier

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Re: Mu and Lemuria

Are they Justified and Ancient?

And what is their view on ice cream vans...

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Re: Mu and Lemuria

I've always thought that Lemuria was Zealandia, the massive V-shaped sunken continent east of Australia, of which New Zealand, New Caledonia, Fiji and Vanuatu are the tops of the highest mountain ranges. It's easily visible on Google Earth, or any topographic ocean-floor map of the southwest Pacific.

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Re: Mu and Lemuria

Well, yes. For that kind of fun, one has to go to Antarctica.

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Re: Mu and Lemuria

+++ No carrier

Oh dear. With all his world domination grabbing plans, Blofeld and his cat still depend on a Hayes modem for their communication needs? This can't be right.

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Re: Mu and Lemuria

With all his world domination grabbing plans, Blofeld and his cat still depend on a Hayes modem for their communication needs? This can't be right.

Of course it's not right. Any true Hayes-modem nerd knows the "+++" is the Hayes escape sequence, while "No carrier" (properly in block capitals) was the message displayed if the carrier was lost. The Cat is confusing two Hayes-based jokes. One is where you posted something along the lines of

+++ATH0

to indicate you were hanging up - roughly an '80s equivalent of "tl;dr" or other "I'm not paying attention to you" sign-off messages. The other was to write some simulated line noise followed by the no-carrier message, as in:

!@#&^$lxkh$^NO CARRIER

to imply that some fell agency had terminated your connection, with prejudice.

This leads me to suspect that the Cat is only trying to make us think he's using a Hayes modem, to lure us into a false sense of secur%^&*(NO CARRIER

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Atlantis was never in the atlantic!

Atlantis was beyond the pillars of Hercules according to Plato. While Gibralter and Africa are now often referred to as pillars of Hercules they were then named the gates (pillars) of Cades which was as far a Hercules went on his hols. There is no reason to say that they were the pillars of Hercules named by Plato while Thera/Santorini fits so many more requirements for being Atlantis - like existing for one.

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"A group of geoboffins now think that further fragments of Mauritia exist below the waves"

If Ian Duncan Smith had his way that line would read A group of shelf stackers....

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RW
Devil

Geoboffins? Good grief, Charlie Brown!

I can see a number of neologisms in the hatching: bioboffins, theoboffins, physioboffins, technoboffins, psychoboffins, socioboffins, anthropoboffins, ecoboffins, archaeoboffins.

http://www.morewords.com/most-common-ends-with/ology/

When will the madness stop?

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Re: Geoboffins? Good grief, Charlie Brown!

"Technoboffins"

Thanks! Now my band has a name!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Geoboffins? Good grief, Charlie Brown!

boffingboffins ?

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Headmaster

Re: Geoboffins? Good grief, Charlie Brown!

psychoboffins, socioboffins, anthropoboffins, ecoboffins,"

No! Sorry, but I'm not having that. Those guys are just plain old "scientists"

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Re: plain old "scientists"

...Except the sociologists.

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Re: plain old "scientists"

and they're trick-cyclists.

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Weird photo

Funny no-one else's mentioned it. Looks like the sea's higher on the calm lake-y side and there are some very odd, large underwater structures whereit tilts smoothly down to the ocean. Looks like a composite. But altogether pretty...

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Meh

I visited Thera and Crete as a spotty youth, and the smoking mini dome in the centre of the big hole at Thera convinced me that it had been a pretty big explosion. The mess it made of Crete was still visible at Knossos when I was there, because they'd just found a few spectacularly decorated sections of the palace under about 4 metres of solidified ash deposits. The Beeb like to dress up their archeology output with hokey pop-science and gosh! wow! gumpspeak, but the Thera/Crete/Atlantis theory has been common currency in most of Europe for the best part of fifty years.

There's no reason why other island dwelling races couldn't have created civilisations based on sea trade in other strategic island chains across the globe, and similarly exploited the flow of of knowledge, craftsmanship, and evolving technology. Maybe they even chose volcanic islands as a base because of the free heat and hot water, as well as the fertility of the surrounding seas. We can only guess at their motives, which is why pop science is so relentlessly hyperbolic.

Our warped sense of European history often precludes the technical genius of eastern cultures, but it stands to reason that an island nation trading freely with the more technically and artistically developed cultures of the east would soon find commercial advantages in the exchange of knowledge and artefacts. This is how civilisations evolve, and then vanish when they eventually become fearful of outside influence and learning. It's entirely possible that the Minoans became isolated groups of refugees whose influence continued to be felt, but in a more subtle and widely dispersed fashion.

Mu may well have been a trading hub of some description, but without a bit more evidence, and some archeological or historic literary clues to its disappearance, it's just a pitch. So let's send the Beeb to make a speculative pop-archeolgy series.

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FAIL

Time, its a curious thing...

"The boffins did not say whether the lost continent was that of Atlantis, Mu or Lemuria."

Well, even assuming the legends might have some basis in truth, it won't be one of them, because this chunk of lost land is 60 million years old, pre-cambrian....

....so, that'd be pre-human days then. By quite some margin.

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Thumb Up

i was there last year

and saw nothing except an all inclusive bar and restaurant. and french women.

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