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back to article Russian boffins race to meteorite crash lake as shard prices go sky-high

Russian boffins have struck out on their own to find fragments of the meteorite that exploded in the sky over Chelyabinsk on Friday morning - amid reports that pieces are fetching as much $10,000. An expedition found a crater in the ice over Lake Chebarkul, where the scientists believe pieces of the space rock landed. "The …

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Trollface

Clearly....

...another kind of "space industry".

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Coat

Re: Clearly....

Psst, would you like come up and see my boloids?

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Re: Clearly....

In Russia, asteroid mines you.

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Alien

There's going to be trouble when those giant aliens come looking for their golf ball

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"You can take this meteorid from my cold, dead fingers!"

From the hole in the ice: "Challenge accepted"

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Anonymous Coward

10,000 tons

or 10.000 tons?

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Re: 10,000 tons

at 17meters long it is conceivable to be around 10,000 tons.

It would have to be very hollow to be only just 10 tons.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10,000 tons

No. 10,000 tons.

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Re: 10,000 tons

All depends on your locale I imagine. In the US or GB, 10,000 tons. In Spain or Italy, 10.000 tons. Elsewhere, it might even be 10 000 tons. I should think it was pretty clear from the context, data being from NASA and all.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10,000 tons

If it had a diameter of 17 metres then, assuming a sphere, it's volume was about 2,600 cubic metres. Water is about 1 tonne per cubic metre, so 10,000 tons of rock is very plausible.

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Re: 10,000 tons

Given it's occupants probably require a gaseous atmosphere to breath in just like us, isn't it likely that it IS hollow and therefore is far lighter than 10,000 tons? Some people just make dumb assumptions.

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Coat

Re: 10,000 tons

To make it easy in Europe it is decimal comma 999.999,99 and in the odd part of the world it is decimal point 999,999.99. Annoying, some damned experience when dealing with databases having it wrong.

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Megaphone

Re: 10,000 tons

And it would have to be basically cubic to get anywhere *near* ten thousand tons. It's not sideritic, it's rocky, so it's approximate specific gravity would be a bit over *2*.

Looks like particularly lazy maths. And that's not a novelty, comign from NASA.

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Joke

Re: 10,000 tons

I should think it was pretty clear from the context, data being from NASA and all.

Pity it wasn't 'tonnes'. Mind you there's not a lot of difference - especially if it hits you on the bonce.

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Devil

Re: 10,000 tons

Are those metric or imperial tons.

Given that I am openly rebelling against the metric version of the ton, and never use the actual imperial ton, and some days can't remember how to spell the metric version, I just use "ton" for everything.

So given that the retards in Lockheed Martian, are the only dimwits left on the planet that use imperial, one could safely say that the ton, is the metric ton, with my spelling.

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Re: 10,000 tons

Seems like it was a mundane lump of peridotite rock - judging by density of over 3kg/cm3 and peridotite being a common material for stony meteorites...

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Happy

Re: 10,000 tons

"Are those metric or imperial tons."

Doesn't really matter for purposes of approximation. The two measurements are happily pretty much the same.

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Vic
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Re: 10,000 tons

> in Europe it is decimal comma 999.999,99

Not so.

I'm in Europe, and over here that would be 999,999.99.

Vic.

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Genuine...

"Russian boffins have struck out on their own to find fragments of the meteorite that exploded in the sky over Chelyabinsk on Friday morning - amid reports that pieces are fetching as much $10,000."

And genuine pieces of the meteorite are selling for even more.

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Coat

Re: Genuine...

Get out of here, Stalker.

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Re: Genuine...

the fools! they'll never make it past the brain scorcher

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Genuine...

Expect a lucrative black market for some time. People newer learn, but then again nor did the Catholic Church.

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I came from space. It landed in a lake

Don't go near the lake after dark or the................... . . . . . . . .

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Re: I came from space. It landed in a lake

haha that misspell gives me an idea. it would be funny to go up to a complete stranger in the street and announce "I came from space!"..well maybe not that funny.

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International pretend to be a space traveller day

is next Thursday.

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Re: I came from space. It landed in a lake

It's just had eye surgery - it's playing havoc with my tryping.

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Re: I came from space. It landed in a lake

It's just had eye surgery - it's playing havoc with my tryping.

Take the bandage off :)

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Go

Re: I came from space. It landed in a lake

On the upside after everyone else has been staring at the fantastic meteor display you will probably find yourself ideally positioned to escape the man-eating plants.

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Could've been worse

If that had come down over Iran or Israel it could have triggered a bit of a nasty incident, and if it had crashed to earth a few thousand kilometers to the West of the Urals instead, France would probably have surrendered.

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Berlin Wall

For a good few years there was a healthy market in East German concrete to gullible westerners.

If this meteor was indeed a stone rather than iron, there's going to be lots of people paying top sums for any old bit of rock.

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Re: Berlin Wall

Ever since the most recent Royal Institute Christmas Lectures ( a TV show aimed at children, but hey, I still learn things) I've desired an acid-etched slice of an iron nickel meteorite called an octahedrite. They showed a large specimen. The etching brings out Widmanstätten patterns, which are beautiful and can't be faked- for them to occur, the rate of cooling through a certain temperature range is no more than 10ºC per million years.

Small samples are around £30 per gram.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octahedrite

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widmanst%C3%A4tten_pattern

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Berlin Wall

Reminds me of when I was at school we had a talk from one of the Lunar Astronauts. In questions afterwards someone asked if he'd been able to keep a bit of moon rock for himself - his answer was no and in any case moon rock just looked like any other rock so even if he had no-one would have known if it was actually from the moon rather than something he'd picked up in his yard!

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Pint

Dig deeper !

Isn't there a mission planned, or perhaps completed, to unearth the remains/core of the lump that fell at Tunguska? The theory behind this being that the heat from the air-burst/core melted the permafrost below the surface and it's remains slipped, gracefully, down into the depths of an ancient marshland/swamp, where, after a time, the permafrost froze again and encapsulated it for posterity. Given the shallow angle of attack in this recent incident, one imagines that there should be a trail of debris, along with a still rather warn to the touch, core, resting at some depth, in, or below, the bottom of said lake/lakeside. Russian engineers are no slouches when it comes to drilling in sub-zero environs, but constructing a robust platform for that purpose might pose a problem. Good luck peeps.

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Re: Dig deeper !

No, you're thinking of Firefox Down.

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Go

Re: Dig deeper !

Isn't there a mission planned, or perhaps completed, to unearth the remains/core of the lump that fell at Tunguska?

There have been several. None have found anything yet.

http://burro.case.edu/Academics/USNA229/tunguska.pdf

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Go

Re: Dig deeper !

The belief is that the Tunguska meteorite exploded in the atmosphere and so nothing actually made it to Earth.

Quite lucky really that it happened where it did, if it had happened over Europe - the loss of life could have been phenomenal.

Mind you if it had happened over Europe and the loss of life had been phenomenal, then we would probably have developed space defenses by now, and be off exploring and settling the other planets in the Solar System... Hmmm....

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Re: Dig deeper !

There's no such thing as delving too greedily or too deep.

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Paris Hilton

Re: Dig deeper !

There's no such thing as delving too greedily or too deep

..Paris icon?

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Anonymous Coward

Skylab

I recall 1979 when Skylab crashed to Earth in Western Australia. Several hundred tons of it were immediately available for sale to collectors.

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Mushroom

10,000 tons, really?

Seems like a lot for an object roughly 55 feet in diameter, but I guess if its highly metallic then it makes sense....

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Re: 10,000 tons, really?

"Seems like a lot for an object roughly 55 feet in diameter, but I guess if its highly metallic then it makes sense...."

I think their estimate might be on the high side, or assuming a lot of metal content, but rock is surprisingly heavy!

http://www.ancient-wisdom.co.uk/top50stones.htm

Granite is 2.75 tons per cubic meter.

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Pint

$33M damage

It'd be ironic (not quite the correct word) if or when the total sales of rock reaches $34M.

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WTF?

Yes, a perfectly circular hole. After an alleged impact of that magnitude I'm astonished that there's actually any water left in the lake at all!

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Given that most of the meteorite has vapourised at about 30km height above ground after releasing 500kt TNT equivalent of energy I'm astonished that enough of it reached the lake to make such a big and nicely round hole...

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Hmm

I will admit, on wandering through Bath one day ( the ancestral city, home from in foreign) to find among the hippie stalls flogging joss sticks and Tibetan caps hand knitted from lentils, a bloke selling meteorite pieces.

All packaged: he was just retailing. Can't remember the name of the company at all but there really is someone out there packaging and grading fragments. Chondrite, nickel/iron, as I say, I can't remember the name of the two men and a dog company that was doing this but I do indeed recall standing gape mouthed in admiration at the sheer free market wondrousness of it.

It was a fiver or something for a few grammes of something not from this world.

A complete blinder as a business, I was seriously impressed.

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Alien

Re: Hmm

Well there is a TV serious about finding and selling chunks of other-worldly bodies.

http://www.meteoritemen.com/

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Thumb Up

Re: Hmm

Strangely compelling viewing as well. Not a bad way to make a living.

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Re: Hmm

I have a piece of metal (Nickel-Iron) meteorite that weighs in about 500g, been saving it up to make some kind of mystical jewellery along with some moldevite :)

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Where have I heard this sort of thing before?

"Next morning, a crowd gathered on the common, hypnotised by the unscrewing of the cylinder. Two feet of shining screw projected, when suddenly, the lid fell off..."

I need to catch a cold, and fast. Those bloboid bastards aren't injecting my blood into their own veins without a fight!

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Happy

Size matters

'.......has found tiny pieces around 50mm in diameter....'

Tiny? I'd be proud of that!

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