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back to article Canada cans net surveillance law

Canada’s Conservative government has decided not to proceed with its attempt to pass the Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act, also known as Bill-C30, after community opposition to the proposed law’s surveillance measures. The Bill (PDF) describes its purpose as follows: “The purpose of this Act is to ensure that …

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Black Helicopters

Finally... Someone with the sense and "balls" to say no to the extreme invasions of privacy (without any oversight) being demanded by "law enforcement" agencies in the name of "protecting the masses".

Now when will other countries recognise that they have given too much power with no checks and balances and finally reject the demands and disband the intrusive laws that are already in place.

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Pint

What? Am I dreaming?

Is this true? How? Where? When? Quid?

Wow....I am so happy because of this. I mean, I hate Stephen Harper and the conservative lunatics running the country but I never thought it would be possible for them to revert back to a Parliament decision because of public outcry. Is this a dream? Is there any hope?

Amazing. El Reg making my day!

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Gold badge

Don't bet against Openmedia

Betting against Openmedia is betting against the Canadian people. We still have some semblance of democracy in the great white north, so angering the Canadian people is the sort of thing our politicians try to avoid. Thoough the Conservatives are trying thier damndest to take our democracy away from us...

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DO these people that keep bringing these laws up have a psychiatric disorder?

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Gimp

@ Kain

Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you. Nietzsche

Or: Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely.

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Re: @ Kain

$deity = all powerful :. all screwed

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Vic Toews

and his wonderful statement

"You're either for this bill or you support paedophiles."

Glad it's going away. Saves me having to bother my MP about it yet again.

Though ranting at your elected rep is certainly fun.

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Gimp

Looks like you've avoided the thin end of a *very* long wedge.

But be warned

Denying a data fetishist his fix just makes them hungrier.

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Anonymous Coward

We will not be proceeding

until you sheep (bears, beavers) forget about it, and then we will try it again, cause it's for your own good, trust me, I'm a politician.

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Silver badge

Re: We will not be proceeding

In the UK it would be locked in a vault until a change of government, and then the spooks and civil servants would get it out and try again.

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Anonymous Coward

Boomerang issues

These things tend to come around, again and again.

Be vigilant.

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Thumb Up

"after community opposition to the proposed law’s surveillance measures". Only in Canada!

The sheep who reside in the USA and the UK, who let their respective governments do almost every thing they want to, wouldn't garner this much attention from their respective politicians.

It all dates back to the late Pierre Trudeau, who had the audacity to stick his middle digit up to the USA, and refused to adopt the preferred US 'guide lines' unlike governments in the UK.

Must have been his French heritage, France has a similar attitude. One is called 'independence' and the other 'subservience'.

Unlike other governments who cross-link all their data-banks so all and sundry, regardless of their need, Canada's data-banks are deliberately decoupled - no nosy civil servants trawling through your life. Occasionally these controls can be a pain, as an inquirer has to travel from one department to another to collect data for the first.

A small price to pay for privacy.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "after community opposition to the proposed law’s surveillance measures". Only in Canada!

So do you refer to things like SOPA being killed in the US as an example of our letting our government do whatever it wants, and to the French three-strikes law as an example of their holding their own government to account?

The US is hardly perfect - the Patriot act is evidence enough of that - but as in most other democracies we have a history of smacking down legislators who go too far. Fair use, SOPA's downfall, the repeated defeat of bills intended to censor violins - err, violence - in video games, the repeated defeat of anti-pornography bills, etc etc.

Accusing people of being 'sheep' is arrogant and passe. You do get points, though, for not using the term 'sheeple', which for me is a bit like being a 9/11 conspiracy freak: You immediately lose all credibility.

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Anonymous Coward

Bills like this are hard to kill permanently

Bills like this are harder to permanently kill than a fusion of Jason, Freddy Kruger, Dracula, cockroaches, Rasputin, and Keith Richards. Even if you drive a stake through its heart, fill its mouth with garlic and sew it shut, behead it with a grave digger's shovel, bury it in hallowed ground at a crossroads, nuke the site from orbit, and drop it down a black hole, it will reform from Hawking radiation, rising from the mist in the sequel - there is just too much desire by the sorts of people who want Power over all us proles for a bill like this to remain dead. Eternal vigilance.

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Re: Bills like this are hard to kill permanently

Well said.

"Eternal vigilance"

The price of freedom - and a lot less messy than having to claw it back afterwards.

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Re: Bills like this are hard to kill permanently

We do have to keep a constant eye on everything the politicians do, just to make sure that they don't try to do something wrong.

Wait... I think I phrased that very badly

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"... opening the online floodgates to smut-peddlers ..."

... rather than empowering clandestine surveillance by a bureaucratic army of perverted peeping toms.

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Bill C-30 is dead! Long live Bill C-55.

Don't worry about our Canadian police being hampered in their ability to monitor online activities now that C-30 is dead. Bill C-55 has been quietly introduced to give police the rights they wanted for warrantless online surveillance, as long as they believe it may be related to a serious crime, and they notify the subject afterward - eventually.

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WTF?

Re: Bill C-30 is dead! Long live Bill C-55.

Which part of C-55 has similarities to C-30?

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/cilp-pdci.nsf/eng/h_cl00790.html

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Coat

Re: Bill C-30 is dead! Long live Bill C-55.

"as long as they believe it may be related to a serious crime"

As opposed to what? A hilarious crime?

Police Chief: "OK, detective - I want full surveillance on this one, you understand?"

Detective: "But sir - the suspect robbed a bank while wearing a pair of underwear like a hat!"

Police Chief: "Haha ha! Oh.. I see your point. Never mind then, just do the usual stuff, eh?"

Detective: "Right. Hey, time for some Tim Hortons?"

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Re: Bill C-30 is dead! Long live Bill C-55.

Exactly. If they can't get it in through the front door they'll sneak it in piecemeal through the windows.

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Joke

Re: Bill C-30 is dead! Long live Bill C-55.

they'll sneak it in piecemeal through the windows.

Look, let's not bring operating system evangelism into this, too!

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Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act,

The only mention of protecting children was in the title.

And I guess if Harper isn't supporting this act, he must be standing with the child pornographers. Just ask Vic Toews, he'll tell you.

And speaking of old Vic, his name doesn't appear on this file anymore.

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Anonymous Coward

They've just figured out...

They've just figured out that they can secretly tap into the fibre optic trunk lines and pry into everyone's communications - no need for an Act.

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Anonymous Coward

I will celebrate

by sending a valentine to my 14 year old Canadian internet girlfriend

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