back to article China may axe 13-year console ban, games OK for kids after all

China may scrap a 13-year ban on the sale of games consoles in the country, according to a government source. Equipment from the Xbox to the PlayStation was outlawed in 2000 for supposedly wrecking the physical and mental development of the young - but consoles may be about to get the official green light in a change of heart by …

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WTF?

Puzzling

Given the stories of young males in China dying after playing for 60 straight hours, or receiving counseling for computer addiction, or their fathers hiring virtual hit-men to grief their son's characters, I was rather surprised to hear there was a console ban in the first place...

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Alert

Re: Puzzling

Aren't all those stories about (South) Korea.... and PC gamers?

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Re: Puzzling

No. Not all of them are from South Korea

A quick search in the Bootnotes got me this: "A Chinese Dad has come up with a unique way of persuading his game-addicted son to turn engage with the real world: hiring gaming pros to destroy his morale by hunting him down online"

What a quick search didn't get me was how to put a link here, so I'll just leave the url:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/01/07/chinese_man_assassinates_son_online/

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WTF?

Puzzling

given that all of these consoles are made in China how can they also be banned there?

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Trollface

Re: Puzzling

Given how many firearms are made in the UK...

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Re: Puzzling

Many of them don't get paid enough to buy the goods that they produce.

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Megaphone

Dont do it!

You're bound to wreck the physical and psychological welfare of the young!

And divert attention from the gold farming industry.

Or something.

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WTF?

what's more confusing is that you can buy a computer (anyone can) and can play any game on there... whats the difference between a computer game and a ps3 or xbox game?

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Re: What's the difference...

...about 30 quid.

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Pint

Re: What's the difference...

@sabroni, I doff my hat to you. Have a pint.

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M7S
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Is their military playing catch up?

I understood experience on consoles was in some way linked to better pilots ore remote vehicles which are of course "the weapon of the future" depending on whose advertising you read.

I've no personal knowledge of this so I apologise if incorrect.

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Go

Re: Is their military playing catch up?

"I understood experience on consoles was in some way linked to better pilots ore remote vehicles which are of course "the weapon of the future" depending on whose advertising you read."

I was told at about age 9 by RAF recruiters to 'play computer games' to improve hand-eye co-ordination if I wanted to be a pilot.

Although China doesn't need to use drones as replacement for boots-in-the-field, because it has plenty of people and no free media to get antsy if they start dying in large numbers.

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Re: Is their military playing catch up?

The USAF uses xbox controllers for the drones.

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Re: Is their military playing catch up?

The Syrian Freedom Fighters (or filthy rebel infiltrators depending on which side you are on) are using playstations to control homemade armored vehicles.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/syria-rebels-playstation-tank-sham-ii-video_n_2272930.html

I suspect China is suddenly realising these aren't just toys but can be cheap military hardware, fancy that.

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WTF?

Really?

If they're illegal, how come so many fake and knock-off consoles are made by China and apparently sold to Chinese consumers?

Seems like a very odd law I never knew existed.

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I too am somewhat puzzled how this console "ban" operates in China, the Chinese specific version of the N64, the iQue Player, was released in China in 2003, apparently 3 years after the ban came in to force.

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Bronze badge

obligatory annecdotal view

My colleague is from china and says most shops have the consoles fully on display in full view and you can buy them easily, though it costs a bit more and are officially meant to be sold in other (asian) territories, i think it was HK though can't remember

so they're probably just taxing something that gets sold openly anyway

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Anonymous Coward

Re: obligatory annecdotal view

I concur with that, I asked a young Chinese that was not even aware that such a ban existed. I saw plenty of them myself when I was living there.

So while it makes for nice, eye-catching headlines, it's just one odd law that was never or little enforced.

Reporting about a far country without even setting foot there, there has to be some misunderstanding on how things actually are.

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Silver badge

So it's like the gay marriage thing here?

As in, everyone who knows anyone in or getting a "civil partnership" is calling it being/getting married and it's only the legal document itself that says different.

(Which is why I'm confused by the fuss some backbenchers are making. Doesn't it make sense for the law to match reality?)

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Anonymous Coward

What parties?

"However, since the ban was issued by seven ministries more than a decade ago, we will need approval from all parties to lift it."

There is only one party made up of 7 guys and a great hall of posses.

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