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back to article Biz barons jumpy over EU draft data protection reforms

An MEP's suggested reforms to EU data protection laws, which are to be put to a vote before the European Parliament, would damage the interests of businesses, an alliance of business groups has said. In a statement, the Industry Coalition for Data Protection (ICDP) criticised the draft report that Jan-Phillip Albrecht published …

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Happy

The end

The end of pre-ticked boxes?

What will the Banks think?

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Anonymous Coward

Oh dear

I'm self employed have only one employee and have over 500 customers, now I will have to employ a data protection officer?

If ever there was a reason for a referendum it is this!

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Re: Oh dear

I'm self employed have only one employee and have over 500 customers, now I will have to employ a data protection officer?

No, you just have to assign the duty to someone in your company: That'll be either you or your employee.

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Re: Oh dear

"If ever there was a reason for a referendum it is this!"

I presume you're a Brit, and this typifies the reasons why the UK appears quite capable of shooting itself in both economic feet by leaving the EU on the basis of knee-jerk reactions propagated by the right-wing populist media. You may not have noticed, but the assaults on your privacy and on your right to control your privacy come mainly from companies operating internationally. International regulations are the only realistic way to correct this, and the EU is a good place to start. Or would it be more efficient for each country in Europe to have its own set of regulations? A Europe-wide regulation that everything diminishing your privacy should be opt-in is much more efficient, and you really won't need a compliance officer as a result. You hereby agree with the preceding statements [X].

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FAIL

Re: Oh dear

I presume you're not a citizen of Ireland or the Club Med countries?

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Re: Oh dear

While I downvoted the OP, 500 does seem low: a dentist, hair dresser, window cleaner or repair shop might easily breach that limit.

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Meh

Re: Oh dear@ Yes Me

Bearded sandal wearing tree hugging Guardian reading Lib Dem voter?

I assume this because of your vitriolic accusatory, burn them at the stake outburst.

Mind you, you could be Spanish, Portuguese, Irish, Maltese, Greek safe in the knowledge that the Bank of Germany will keep you afloat during your occupation.

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Re: Oh dear

there's no reason the "dedicated data protection officer " can't be the owner.

The question for these small companies should be- Are the proposed duties of the dedicated data protection officer too onerous for a small company?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Oh dear

"I presume you're a Brit, and this typifies the reasons why the UK appears quite capable of shooting itself in both economic feet by leaving the EU on the basis of knee-jerk reactions propagated by the right-wing populist media"

Obviously I'm not the OP, but I am not quite so sure that it has been adequately demonstrated that leaving the EU would be the absolute and unmitigated disaster some claim it would be - a tempestuous process perhaps, but absolute disaster in the long term? I'm not so sure.

The UK is, in some very simple ways, more important to the EU than the EU is to the UK, for example look that the import/export trade data.

We have already had the Germans over here recently spouting doomsday rhetoric about the UK leaving the EU. In addition we have had the US lecturing to us as well. But so f***ing what? Believe all such rhetoric if you will, you are free to do so after all. But hidden inside all such doom-saying, is a hidden self-serving agenda. It's not bloody altruism!

The EU is a protectionist political organisation (see recent stories on international arrest warrants being issued for garlic 'smuggling' and the reasons behind it for a somewhat humorous instance). For other sheer bloody mindedness and self-serving interests of certain member nations, you only have to look at the CAP madness.

There is both good and bad (along with a grotesque collection of expensive political and legal absurdities) to be had by being a part of the EU.

Simply put, the EU is, as it stands at this time, a political, legislative and financial mess.

As for the comment about the right-wing populist media, I notice that you also fail to condemn the lunacy of the far left socialists who want a simple no-borders, free-for-all, single superstate. Let's not forget, both right and left wing policy are equally flawed.

At the end of the day, the the voting hoi polloi in the UK deserve to have the last say, after all, socialist, right-wing or centre, we still live in a democracy albeit clothed as a 'businessocracy'.

[Talking of the EU... I had to laugh... I just heard Nick Clegg referring to France as 'one of our closest allies'. Hahaha, fucking hilarious! Politicians... Always selling porkies believing that us plebeians will fall for it].

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Childcatcher

Sir Humphrey

seems to have found another post-early-(but on full pension)retiral consultancy with his business friends.

Never have so many words been written with so little meaning ...

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Interests of business?

If the interests of a business depend on deceiving its prospective customers, then it has no right to support from the EU or any government-backed organisation.

What's wrong with the concept of explicitly telling the user how they intend to use their data and giving them a clear option to approve/not approve?

And while we're at it, also to approve/decline installation of extra browsers or browser toolbars etc. which have bugger-all to do with the application or service that they're signing up to?

It's about time businesses just shut up and started treating their customers/victims with a little respect.

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Unhappy

It'll never catch on

From the article, all the ammendments sound quite sensible to me (unless I've missed something) In which case, it'll never get passed :-(

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Anonymous Coward

think different

regardless of checkbox, the time legally assigned for the use of personal data should be 2 years. After two years you get an e-mail: are you still giving us still the rights to use your personal data? Yes/No. No answer means no.

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Reasonable

I agree with the e-mouse above, it's too reasonable and sensible to pass. The vested interests will fight this one to the bitter end, while most consumers will carry on completely oblivious. I'm generally in favour of the referendum approach to the EU, but I'm happy to acknowledge when someone's trying to do something right. Sadly I think he'll be voted down.

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Bronze badge

not too Complex to enforce

Company websites seem quite capable of enforcing me to type a number in the "telephone" part of a webform (though fortunately not all check to see that the digits after the area code aren't 000000), it shouldn't be beyond them to ensure that a customer has ticked either "Yes I enjoy receiving post, even if I have to throw most of it away" or "No, I don't want your mates to send me crap".

Presumably once clear consent has to be achieved with Data Protection, the next stop will be Pre-ticked insurance, and other add-ons to the purchase in web forms (mentioning no Irish economy airlines of course)

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Big Brother

As summarized, the proposal sounds rather good ...

and therefore it will be a foggy day in hell before we get anything like it in Canada.

G.

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Are They Really Trying to Say Pre-ticked Is OK...

after saying that the IE tracking opt out being ticked by default wasn't legitimate?

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