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back to article Happy now? Mobiles, cloud, big data now 'a growing security risk'

Innovations in mobile and cloud computing, social technology and the use of "big data" present an emerging risk to organisations' IT security, experts have warned. The European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA), which is an EU advisory body, said that those technologies would increasingly provide the platform for " …

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Gee, you think?

The mind absolutely boggles ... We groked this back in 1979.

Marketards & Manglement, in the current era, are a clusterfuck waiting to implode when it comes to computers & networking..

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Re: Gee, you think?

Yah jake you had lots of mobile devices back in '79. Lay off on those bath salts, will ya?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Gee, you think?

They also had big data, at least a whole 64K of it.

What anyone could do with that many characters though is another matter, it would take one man at least a week to read through it all. Preposterous!

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Re: Gee, you think?

"They also had big data, at least a whole 64K of it."

Big data has nothing to do with quantity of bits, big refers to complexity. Twitter is a good example, every tweet ever posted would fit on a USB drive yet the problem of mining that data is enormous.

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::sighs:: Kids these days ... (was:Re: Gee, you think?)

@DAM: Look up the IBM 5100, from 1975. Xerox's NoteTaker followed in 1976. The particular machine I was discussing was GM Research's Micro Star, from 1979. The place where I worked in that timeframe (Bigger Blue) recognized the issues that such a tool would add to corporate, government and military security when combined with new-fangled electronically coupled modems.

@AC10:31: We had flight simulators running in 64K before the original IBM PC was released. "Big" is relative. Corporate data was corporate data even during the Industrial Revolution.

The more we forget history ...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Gee, you think?

The majority of definitions of Big Data do refer to the size aspect

What you have given an example of there is unstructured data which is another issue and can be seen as a sub set of big data.

Personally I think that big data should be avoided in a proper technical discussion, it's definition is far too loose and size is relative

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Re: Gee, you think?

"The majority of definitions of Big Data do refer to the size aspect"

No, they usually refer to "large data sets" which usually means lots of data rather than large data. For instance an exabyte file system with 1 piece of data is not a big data problem because (assuming serial data) you only need to process 1 file and you can't split it into multiple workloads. Instead this would be a traditional data problem easily solvable by increasing throughput. It's generally coincidental that "big data" tends to be large data, but usually you'd have information which can be processed in parallel or many instances of data leading to the "big data" problem. The problem with big data is processing it in a reasonable time frame, and not increasing processing time exponentially with data set size as you would using traditional analysis techniques.

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"More specifically, attackers are moving into targeting browser plugins such as Java (Java exploits are the major cross-platform threat), Adobe Reader and Adobe Flash,"

Hmm, if only there was a mobile maker who kept these things off their mobiles we'd have somewhere safe to go....

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Trollface

Yes, Apple IDs are as safe as houses.

Or at least ones with the keys hanging on a peg by a front door.

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Innovations in mobile and cloud computing, social technology and the use of "big data" present an emerging risk to organisations' IT security, experts have warned.

Are these the same "experts" that years ago told us the cloud is the next big thing and everyone must use it?

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Please stop using the name Hacker for these criminals

A Hacker is NOT a cracker:

http://www.tcs.org/ioport/apr05/hackers.htm

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