Feeds

back to article German ebook firm pushes cheapo ereaders into US drug stores

US book distributor ReaderLink will be pushing German firm txtr's impossibly cheap ereader into US grocery and drug stores, launching a new cloud platform which will also support the devices. The cheap ereaders cost a mere €10 on this side of the pond, but dollar pricing has not yet been announced. Txtr's Beagle ereader was …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Silver badge

How did I miss this?

A £10 epaper display to add to my own hardware?

Where?

4
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: How did I miss this?

It's subsidised and since it would not run Kindle books or iBooks it's got an uphill struggle. If you have yo have a smartphone anyway you may as well read it on the smartphone - yes I appreciate the screen would be bigger but I'd also expect the prices of books to be higher and less choice of titles to repay the subsidy.

If you want a cheap e-reader you may as well spend a bit more and get a Kindle or do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7 and have a device that does so much more besides.

1
3
Happy

Re: How did I miss this?

Exactly what I thought! Cheap hardware to hack.

1
0
Thumb Down

Re: How did I miss this?

It costs £10 *if you also buy a smartphone contract*. The linked article is hideously misleading. They don't seem to be planning to sell them on their own.

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: How did I miss this?

Did seem far too good to be true - either that or the books would be more expensive - they have to get the money back somewhere.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

"do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7"

Do it properly with a bright screen shining into every recess of your attempted relaxation?

The reason the kindle beats all for books is how much easier it is on the eyes. After staring at a computer screen all day, I don't want to stare at a reflective backlit display for enjoyable reading too. (Paperwhite is "backlit", but that's a different beast...)

6
0

Re: "do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7"

Paperwhite may technically be "backlit" ((I've not taken it apart) but when it comes to reading it is a world away from a traditional backlit display. Personally I don't even notice that it's lit unless it's pitch dark but, then, I do have the brightness turned to minimum (though I'll admit I wish I could turn it off completely to save battery).

I used to read from my iPad on my commute and my eyes certainly prefer the paperwhite.

3
0

Re: "do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7"

It's front lit. the light comes from the sides, and across a light guide sheet.

http://ebookfriendly.com/2012/09/30/how-the-kindle-paperwhite-front-lit-display/

2
0
Silver badge

Re: "do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7"

I have the Kobo Glo which has the same/similar display and I'd describe it as 'side-lit'. With the Glo, I can turn the lighting off and I find that with the lighting on at minimum then it gives a definite increase in contrast/readability over the unlit state, even in indoor lighting conditions. Because it's side-lit, you don't get the feeling of something shining into your eyes.

I can look a a backlit LCD screen all day in good ambient lighting conditions, but at home in the evening, I prefer a side-lit e-ink screen for reading books.

3
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: "do it properly with an iPad Mini / Nexus 7"

I have no issue reading on an iPad - I'd rather have colour, I like the constant scroll option in iBooks (which would not work with eInk) and with the backlight down low it's very comfortable in a darkened room.

0
2
Silver badge

Arrrg

Now if they had a version that works WITHOUT a smartphone I'd get one. Of course they won't as it would cut the subsidy source...

0
0

Re: Arrrg

The smartphone is there to do the heavy lifting of connecting to the net, browsing the store, downloading the book, then converting the whole book to monochrome bitmap images of the pages. It's basically an e-ink photo-viewer

Without the phone the device would need more power & therefore more expensive

2
1
Silver badge

Re: Arrrg @ Alan6

Thank you for rephrasing the spec sheet (and the article).

I am not so dumb as to hope for a full-fledged computer with this battery life and for that price. I know it must just be a display device. I would have bought one if it could be hooked up to a real computer instead of a smartphone. Which would allow me to use it (yay) but would cut the subsidizing stream (no-go).

Is that more understandable?

0
0

Re: Arrrg @ Alan6

To be honest they're probably targeting this device at people who don't have a computer, but do have a cheapo Android phone that's got enough power to render an epub file into a stack of bitmaps

0
1
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Niche Player

I'm looking at this as a device that can be used in environments where I would otherwise not want a more expensive alternative. For example, I have a lot of cookbooks in electronic form, but I currently print out recipes for use rather than hauling the laptop into the kitchen. I expect I will be able to set a txtr up in the kitchen and not have to worry so much that it will get trashed. For a 10, I can replace it if things go horribly wrong with a bisque.

1
0
Silver badge
Happy

Re: Niche Player "if things go horribly wrong with a bisque."

You could use Blu-Tack to stick it to the wall, or a cupboard door, to keep it out of harm's way and at eye level.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Niche Player

You can get iPad (and other tablet) docks to hold your precious. Think cookery would also benefit from colour?

0
1
Silver badge

Newspapers

Why doesn't the Times or NYT or similar bundle this with a subscription?

Add an that docks it with your smartphone to download todays paper overnight, or even a standalone cradle with a little android device that connects to your wifi.

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Newspapers

Quick, tell the guardian about this!

0
0

I want several.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.