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back to article Long-distance robot makes landfall in Oz

The first of four autonomous ocean-spanning robots with software brewed by Java creator James Gosling has arrived in Australia intact after more than 365 days at sea. Last March, the robots entered the Guinness Book of Records for the longest autonomous seafaring journey, when they passed the 5,150 km-mark on their journey. In …

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This is an amazing step forward for those in the smuggling trade.

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irritatingly anthropomorphised... as “he”

I suspect, Richard, that had the company gynopomorphised (is that a cromulent word?) the robot as "she", that you might not have found it as "irritating". After all, is "she" not the pronoun that has been used for seagoing vessels since time immemorial?

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Joke

Re: irritatingly anthropomorphised... as “he”

Surely it's a "he" because it is a submersible, which historically have been long, hard and full of seamen. (In this case electronic)

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Headmaster

Re: irritatingly anthropomorphised... as “he”

I think there's a clue in the name Papa Mau.

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Stop

Re: irritatingly anthropomorphised... as “he”

You will find that HM Ships King George V, Prince of Wales, Duke of York et all are ALWAYS described as "she".

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Joke

"with software brewed by Java creator James Gosling"

Given Java's rather leaky reputation I guess just staying afloat for a year is quite an achievement.

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Another boat arrival

Has it been transferred to Villawood yet?

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Coat

Re: Another boat arrival

It's refusing to eat anything.

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Coat

Papa ooh mau mau

Mine's the one with the 45 single in the pocket.

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Linux

Re: Papa ooh mau mau

Word.

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Happy

I would like to know a bit more about his "Wave propulsion" , all the rest of it seemss a bit everyday I'm sure even I could write a java program to follow a gps

But WTF is wave propulsion? I am intrigued

(yes, i heard of surfing)

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Basically, you have a floaty bit, and a sunken bit attached by some something solid or at least inelastic. The floaty bit bobs on waves bigger than it is long. So it rides up and down. The sunken bit isn't affected much by the wave, but since it's attached, it gets dragged up and down through the water. If you attach some flappy planes or wings to the sunken bit, arranged so that they can swivel some through horizontal on an offset pivot, that up-and-down gets vectored into a small amount of thrust in the direction that the pivot is offset, which shoves the sunken bit forward, dragging the floaty bit along with it. It's not much thrust, each wave, but it's essentially free, and if you coat the floaty bit with enough solar cells (and/or attach generation equipment to your flappy planes), you make a robot boat out of it that will go where the robot brain says to, eventually,

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Coat

now why can't

The BBC explain stuff like that it makes it so much more easy to comprehend.

<------- the one with the flappy bits....

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Oh no!

Java-coded robot at sea for over a year without an update! How are they EVER going to get that ask.com toolbar installed??

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Thumb Up

You, Sir, should host a science program called "tricky bits".

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