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back to article Children increasingly named after Apple products

Not only are the kids desperately keen to get Apple products, their parents are also naming them after Apple products - we learn from the latest yearly analysis of baby names. The moniker Apple, though still an unusual choice, rose 15 percent for girls, vaulting a whopping 585 spots. For boys, the name Mac jumped 12 percent. And …

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Joke

Siri

Is that how stereotypical Chinese folk pronounce 'Silly' ?

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Meh

An indirect

form of child abuse that will come to haunt the lives of those parents in the future.

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Re: Siri

Very siri articrle indeed..

For Apple, you can also blame Gwynneth Paltrow, who gave her kid that name. Allegedly from "the apple of my eye", but it's tenuous.

Siri is a Norwegian given name (diminutive of Sigrid). One of the (Norwegian) developers of the Siri software registered the domain when he and his wife were expecting their first child; if it had been a girl, she was to be called Siri. As it happened, he had a son. It's not a common name, but not exactly rare either : http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Siri says 0.5% of Norwegian baby girls were named Siri, with a peak in the early 1990s. Perhaps this was popularised by Apple, but given the proven effect of celebrity names on birth names, it could also be being used as a variation of Tom Cruise's sprog, Suri (of Hebrew origin, meaning Princess).

Mac means "Son" in Gaelic languages (Irish and Scots), pronounced somewhere between "mock" than "mack", but never as a given name. But.. if Japanese parents can name their first-born sons "Ichiro", I don't see why we can't extend that kind of literalism to other languages.

In the case of Americans, "Mac" or "Mack" was a common nickname for men of Irish or Scots descent, especially around the middle of the last century, so a baby boy called Mac might be due to parents remembering his grandfather or great-grandfather, rather than their first personal computing experience...

In other words, not everything is down to Apple, or even has anything to do with computers at all..

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@LarsG Re: "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

.......(we are talking very late fifties, very early sixties here), one of my playmates was a young lad from a family whose surname was "Hood" - I do not think that you will have to strain yourself to guess what forename those idiots gave him. Imagine, growing up and attending school when every time you went out into the schoolyard there was a mass chorus of "Robin Hood, Robin Hood, riding through the glen, Robin Hood, Robin Hood and his band of men."* Some people should be banned from reproducing themselves.

*For the (much) younger amongst us there was a very popular series about the famous outlaw on the telly in the early sixties starring an actor called Richard Greene. It was at that time compulsory viewing on a Saturday evening (God help us all). What you can see in quotation marks above is a quote from the series' theme tune.

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Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

Arctic Fox,

There was a story on the News Quiz many years ago, about a couple who decided to walk down the aisle at their wedding to the theme from 'Robin Hood Prince of Thieves'.

But as you can guess, this didn't quite work out. Instead of getting Brian Adams emoting, "Everything I do, I do it for you." They got the rather more thigh-slapping: Robin Hood, Robin Hood riding through the glen etc.

I'm pretty sure they had a better musical experience - even if a less earnest one...

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Vic
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Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

> guess what forename those idiots gave him

I went to school with a girl called Theresa Green. What utter bastards her parents must have been...

Vic.

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Headmaster

Re: Siri

Mac is derived of course from original Apple Macintosh, itself named for the McIntosh Red, a variety of apple as originally cultivated by John McIntosh. The name McIntosh itself refers to 'son of the Chief'.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: An indirect

Yeah why not call them Droid or Sam Sung or Ice Cream Sandwich - ho ho.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Siri

Wikipedia overload.

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@I ain't Sparticus "They got the rather more thigh-slapping....."

I think that even if the bride and groom took the mistake in good part I would have paid good money to see the expression on the faces of the respective mothers in law!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

> I went to school with a girl called Theresa Green.

Me too. The one I know always said that when she got married she'd take the surname 'Purple' just to mess with people.

I also know of a Mr. Hugh Cumber.

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Pint

Re: Siri

... and my former gf, who had the charming habit of responding to almost any statement with "oh rearry?"

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Anonymous Coward

Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

.. and my mate Steve Jones called his daughter India Anna (two innocuous and popular names independently I might add)

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Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

Hands up those 6-year olds who had the hots for Maid Marian, but were not quite sure why.

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Re: @LarsG "An indirect form of child abuse.........." When I was a very little chap..........

And us Australians know of the honorable Richard Face.

Bet he got hell going through school

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Facepalm

"And us Australians know of the honorable Richard Face"

i can top that - I genuinely know of a man named Richard Head.

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Re: An indirect

Why yes, what a crazy name Sam Sung would be...

http://www.loopinsight.com/2012/11/17/apple-specialist-sam-sung/

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Joke

Changed my Name

No longer Betamax LaserDisc the third.

Whats that about fads again?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "And us Australians know of the honorable Richard Face"

yes, he went to Scots!

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Re: "And us Australians know of the honorable Richard Face"

I know a former tech executive who's Christian name was Richard Lord, but he insisted on going by "Dick". He wasn't even a very affable, easy-going type.

I still can't figure out why he did that to himself.

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Go

Re: An indirect

"Yeah why not call them Droid or Sam Sung ..."

I think there is actually a Sam Sung working in an Apple store somewhere.

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Re: "And us Australians know of the honorable Richard Face"

I once worked with a Richard Ayres, who actually preferred to be called 'Dick'.

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Devil

Re: Siri

Siri?

What about Battery, or Charger?

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Happy

Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then...

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TRT
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Isn't Dr Who's new companion...

going to be called Oswin, presumably short for OSWin98?

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"Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then..."

Or my son BoB.

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Re: "Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then..."

or my son 'Windows7ProfessionalEvaluationCopy'

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Re: "Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then..."

or my children, RS232 interface and centronics

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Re: "Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then..."

Or, the character from Hook:

"Me, Me. What About Me? Me! Me! Windows Me. What about Me? Me's me. What about me?"

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Re: "Just don't tell anyone about my daughter Vista then..."

> Or my son BoB.

I do hope he's "little Bobby Tables"

http://xkcd.com/327/

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Windows

The male counterpart of Tiffany would be Tifkam,

but what is the correct british pronunciation of that name?

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MrT
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Tifkam...

...pronounced 'Teabag'?

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Devil

Four syllable word for that.

Lo-oo-se-ers.

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Anonymous Coward

So Android, Galaxy, Note or Xperia would be better huh?

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Trollface

new revenue steam?

Apple will have a whole string of people they can sue for trademark infringement.

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Anonymous Coward

I just asked my teenage daughter Release Candidate Number Three. She didn't see the humour in it.

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Most teenage children get a bit RC from time to time anyway.

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Happy

we should arrange a "playdate" (gahd, who invented that one) - my son "Alpha" and daughter "Beta" need to get out more.

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Re: Most teenage children get a bit RC from time to time anyway.

Well done sir, have an upvote!

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IT Angle

Not all iBrats

I assume the rise in the name Apple is also related to the fact "celeb" Gwyneth Paltrow called their child Apple?

(I only know that because someone told me ... honest)

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Re: Not all iBrats

A fair assumption, but not if you're writing for the Reg.

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Re: Not all iBrats

Good idea. I'll call my son Reg.

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MrT
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Good stuff...

... but why not also give him an unused first name beginning with 'L'...?

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Re: Good stuff...

Good plan. Seeing as my surname is Hubbard...

L. Reg Hubbard has a nice ring to it.

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Anonymous Coward

None of those soound exclusively Apple based.

I'll only be convinced it's AppleCorp inspired if the name 'MacBook Pro (13")' is used to register a birth somewhere.

Or someone gets sued by Apple over the name of their spawn.

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Facepalm

Re: None of those soound exclusively Apple based.

We have the further problem between Apple names in (well, once) common usage and their official usage. for example, if I name my child 'Blue & White G3', will Apple then tell me that the official name is actually 'Power Macintosh G3' and make me change it? There are 2 'Power Macintosh G3's and it will lead to confusion.

We need answers to these questions.

And what about version numbers? Just of the embarrassment poor iPhone 3GS has, now that the iPhones are at v5? The parents are clearly to blame here.

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Devil

Xbox

Surely an intriguing name for any girl, especially one with an unusually shaped piece of their anatomy...

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Prior feline usage of the name

My cat is called Siri, but he's over 7 years old, so he's been using the name for far longer than Apple. Maybe he can sue them...? Can cats sue?

It's causing massive confusion at home, with the phone answering when I call the cat, and the cat answering when I use the phone: "Siri find me a decent Thai restaurant in North London", "Mwaiou"

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Re: Prior feline usage of the name

I don't think cats 'use' their names do they? Their owners staff, might use them, but the felines themselves don't give a damn. Rattling bowls of food seems to be the only call they'll deign to respond to. Maybe...

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