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back to article Fujitsu's canine cloud keeps pets petite

Japanese tech giant Fujitsu has tapped its considerable expertise in cloud and mobile computing to produce a canine health management system designed to stop pet dogs from getting too fat. The unlikely tech innovation requires a rather chunky pendant to be worn round a mutt’s neck. The device includes a pedometer, a thermometer …

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So, basically, the Japanese hoi poloi ...

... have no clue about actual pet animal husbandry? You can throw as much silicon at that as you like, but it won't fix the brain-dead idiots who keep pets as fashion accessories.

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Rather have just a GPS tracker for my four legged friend

Sodding thing ran off again the other night, spent ages looking him eventually found him outside the bitches house up the road. Must get one of these fangled GPS things.

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Re: Rather have just a GPS tracker for my four legged friend

Thank you for making my point, Dave.

Please, find a new home for your "four legged friend" that you obviously have no interest in maintaining an actual friendship with.

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Re: Rather have just a GPS tracker for my four legged friend

I disagree when a bitch is on heat, and she is walked past the house - nothing will keep an intelligent dog behind a walled garden. He is not a fashion accessory and you sir are an arse!

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Re: Rather have just a GPS tracker for my four legged friend

I'm an arse because you can't manage your dog? I believe that's what the Trick Cyclists call "projection". My dogs don't go a courtin' unless I allow it. I'm the pack leader, and they know it.

He's not a fashion accessory? Cool! Rare, that. What do you productively use him for?

And no, I don't beat mine into submission. Violence never works[1]; all you do is teach the critter that violence is an option ... in fact, I rarely even have to raise my voice. If they can see me, all I have to do is make gestures. Handy in high-noise situations like grading, mowing, and this evening's rain (Sonoma, California).

[1] Rare exception: brood mares & stud colts. See: http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/containing/542423 ... Herb[2] is now four years old, started under saddle, and doing nicely, popping over small Xs. He sniffs after the ladies, but keeps all four planted firmly on the ground unless he's being worked by me. He's the first stallion I ever had complete training control over, right from the git-go (I delivered him), and an awful lot of fun. He's teaching me more about equine behavior than I'm teaching him what humans expect from him. My Granddaughter (age two) can toddle between his legs, not that I encourage that behavior :-)

[2] Caen, that is. I'm not a pot-head. Not enough hours in the day.

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Re: Rather have just a GPS tracker for my four legged friend

You really need to grow up!

I pass a comment on the gadget, and suddenly you are having a go at me implying that I have no interest in my dog and that he is a fashion accessory and I should give him away.

What the hell are you on about?

He is a rescue dog not some "show dog" fashion accessory, he comes with me shooting.

He is not my friend - he is my dog - but like a mongrel dog he will hump anything on heat, if that means jumping over 6 foot fence he will do it.

Yes - I still think you are an arse, but an unnecessarily aggressive arse!

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Japanese say " wan wan " as English speakers say " woof woof "

and some of the dogs I've seen in Japan could definitely benefit from some better care - being a status symbol doesn't always translate into an ideal life for the poor beggars...

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Alternatively.....

They could just take their pet to the vet annually/twice a year as they should do anyway for jabs & a check up, and the vet will observe & maybe weigh it & tell you whether it needs to go on a diet or have more exercise? Especially when you consider that every dog is slightly different, and 2 puppies from the same litter brought up together often have differing diets & exercise. If an owner can't tell if their pet is shivering they don't deservie to own one in the first place, and doesn't take into account that dogs will shiver from nerves not just cold. I could go on & on about how little relevance this data has to looking after a pet properly.

Yet another tech solution for a problem that has a much better non-tech solution.

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Re: Alternatively.....

When dogs are "shivering from nerves", their owners need to be slapped.

Some of us are pack leaders. The rest shouldn't own dogs.

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Re: Alternatively.....

Completely agree Jake. Though of course it could be that it had a fright of some kind, and I know a few show dogs who get very keyed up & excited at shows.

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Re: Alternatively.....

I breed & show Whippets & Greyhounds ... supposedly amongst the most "keyed up" dogs around. None of mine are "shivery", because they know that I am in control of the situation, always. A couple get quite intense at shows, though ... Those three are multiple BIS.

Our pack saves the excitement for coursing, flyball, agility and ground-squirreling :-)

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Re: Alternatively.....

I am impressed Jake, especially re the Whippets; I'm guessing a really decent relaxed home life on your farm helps too. I don't have my own dogs as my lifestyle wouldn't be fair on a pet however much I might want one, but a close friend breeds & shows miniature poodles and some of them get so keyed up at shows they do quiver (note quiver not shiver, big difference) with excitement. Of course others are so laid back they are almost comatose until they get in the actual ring. It does also depend on the individual dog of course, she has litter mate brother & sister we brought out together & she's non-stop bounce all day whereas he just lies there until you get in the ring then he wakes up - both qualified Crufts next year already, at 9 months

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