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back to article Bradley Manning to speak in public for first time in two years

US Army private Bradley Manning will speak publicly for the first time in two years, when he's called as a witness in a pre-trial hearing later today. Manning, who is accused of "aiding the enemy" by handing over army secrets to Wikileaks, is expected to be called to testify at Fort Meade army base in a hearing that's expected …

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If you are in the nick for 900+ days because the plod cannot get their collective s--- together you should get credit for every single day you are confined.

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Anonymous Coward

traitor

He is a traitor, he should be in an orange suit, somewhere ina conrete pen in guantanamo bay, being waterboarded every other day

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Actually,

In Canada, you get a double credit for every day you spend in jail pre-trial.

If you ask me, they should give him a week's credit for every pre-trial day he spent in solitary confinment.

/not an anonymous coward

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You do get credit in the UK too - I had a fine slashed in half for spending a weekend in the cells. I was unemployed at the time and enjoyed my brief stint inside. They had the best cheese ploughman's sandwiches I seem to recall.

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Mushroom

Re: traitor

I see your point. Let me ask you this:

was he a traitor to:

1) the United States of America,

2) its Government

3) the human race

I pick #2, and at the same time makes him a hero for #1 and #3.

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Re: traitor

Only a real COWARD would say that, hiding behind an appropriate name.

I guess it's OK for the military to shoot up innocent civilians including two Reuters people?

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But since the Chimpanzee stated they were only killing brown skinned people

In the name of democracy, he got re-elected.

Oddly I don't rememebr where this reply was heading when I wrote the title.

I think I am turning into an American.

Oh god!

May I have a gun?

I want to shoot myself.

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Joke

Re: Re: traitor

"....I guess it's OK for the military to shoot up innocent civilians...." What, now you're trying to claim the military is injecting them with heroin?

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FAIL

Re: traitor

"He is a traitor"

Not until he's found guilty in a court, dumbass.

Or do you want your 'land of the free' to just freely torture its citizens without trial?

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Stop

"If you are in the nick for 900+ days because the plod cannot get their collective s--- together you should get credit for every single day you are confined."

You do.

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FAIL

Re: traitor

Wow, you're brave AC! Courage of your convictions there and everything!

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Re: traitor

He is a hero, he spilled the beans on our governments corruption and abuses. He didn't do it to help an "enemy" or line his pockets. He did it out of horror and disgust of an administration drunk with power so badly that it saw itself above the law.

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FAIL

Re: Re: traitor

Dana, he did it in a fit of childish rage brought about by his inabaility to deal with his transgender issues and accept military life, something other gays in the military did not find to be half the burden Manning turned it into.

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Anonymous Coward

Herr Doktor Bryant's complete analysis of Bradley Manning

will appear in next week's edition of The Onion.

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Anonymous Coward

They should let him do the honourable thing, and volunteer for a suicide mission doing

laser spotting up a mountain above a terrorist training camp in the wilds of pakistan.....thats what I would do if I had gone soft in the head and I had betrayed my country....

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Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

I thought he leaked a load of low-grade junk that hundreds of thousands of people had access to?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

He leaked whatever he could. He therefore endangered allied personnel.

They should shoot him to send a clear message to would be traitors.

What if your life was put at risk by someone like Manning?

He has not got the guts to reclaim his honour. A squad of six riflemen could retrieve a scrap of it, at dawn.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

I haven't seen any hard proof that the information that was leaked has directly or indirectly endangered allied personnel, except his own which has widely been reported on.

Not saying what he did was justified, just the argument you use is right up there with 1 download == 1 lost sale.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

1 download == 1 lost sale.

Straw man rubbish.

Nope nothing like that at all.

Al Queada will study all the info relevant to them, which mountain routes are known/noticed by the allies,

what tactics they think work and those that don't. It handing the enemy info they could not have otherwise got.

He deserves to be shot

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

No, it's exactly like that because it's just as idiotic an argument. Have you actually studied at the information released and what he had access to?

I'm sure they get lots more secret information from the people working directly with the forces, then again i could be wrong... maybe it goes down like this "shit guys, we need to know where to plant a roadside bomb..." "Sigh... ...alright, I'll hit up Wikileaks again"

Again, no proof has ever been shown that what was leaked has ever caused one causality.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

Really it does not matter what he leaked. The army classifies information at various secrecy levels for a reason, and anyone leaking it is by definition a traitor and aiding the enemy. In WWII they guy would have been shot already! If the US army wants to keep credibility (and secrets) it has to shoot manning.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

Yes, they have to shoot him. Otherwise other people will think leaking military secrets is somehow acceptable.

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Flame

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

Hell, why bother with waterboarding, suicide missions or firing squads? Why don't you just burn him at the stake and be done with it!!!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

You're not really very much up on carbon credits and global heating, are you?

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FAIL

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

"He leaked whatever he could. He therefore endangered allied personnel."

He wasn't mentally stable enough to be in the job in the first place.

Therefore his BOSS is just as guilty. Bray for his head too, if you're going to bray for anyone's.

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FAIL

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

"In WWII they guy would have been shot already!"

No he wouldn't. Read it:

Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_punishment_by_the_United_States_military

Murder and rape get you shot or hung (or rather: used to). Nobody has been executed for aiding the enemy.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

What about the rosenburgs ?

Not even in the army....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_and_Ethel_Rosenberg

Shoot the traitorous wus....

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Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

Newsflash: There is no such thing as "Al Qaeda".

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Stop

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_and_Ethel_Rosenberg"

Except they were guilty of espionage during a time of war, which isn't the charge Manning is facing. So the comparison is a little like apples and oranges.

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Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

"Newsflash: There is no such thing as "Al Qaeda"."

Likewise there is no such thing as most of the Virgin brand; they are franchises.

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FAIL

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

@AC 16:16. Does the US Government shoot spies for 'the other side' that have been captured?

I think not. So why the ire for Manning?

Recently, in the United States, from public records:

2010: Dongfan Chung. Sentenced to 15 years for passing secrets to China.

2010: Anna Chapman and 9 friends. Arrested, then deported in a swap with Russia for 4 US agents.

2010: Kendall Myers, and wife. Sentenced to life in prison for spying for Cuba.

2010: Noshir Gowadia. Spying for China.

2010: Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni, and wife. Spying for Venezuela.

2010: Glenn Shriver. Spying for China. 4 years imprisonment.

2010: Minkyu Martin.

2011: Mohamad Anas Haitham Soueid. Spying for Syria. Sentenced in 2012 to 18 months.

2011: Kexue Huang. Passing on information about pesticides to China, so probably does not count.

2012: Alexander Fishenko. Indicted along with 11 others, as an agent for the Russian military.

None of the above have been shot.

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Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

"Really it does not matter what he leaked. [...] anyone leaking [Information] is by definition a traitor and aiding the enemy."

Even if the information is no use to the enemy? So leaking information that in no way...let me think of a word...aids the enemy, is by definition aiding the enemy?

That doesn't seem to follow the normal rules of logic.

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Boffin

Re: Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

".....Even if the information is no use to the enemy?...." It is not the possible value of a secret to the enemy if leaked but the fact that something designated as a secret, for which an oath has been sworn to protect, has been leaked. The "aiding an enemy" is an add-on.

For example, if Manning had leaked the combination for the safe in the Whitehouse Oval Office, this would be seen as a big secret, despite it being of little value to AQ or the Taleban as they are unlikely to get into the Oval Office any time soon. But, leaking the times at which the canteens in Bahgram is serving lunch every day, whilst seeming to be a minor secret to you, could be of great value to AQ and/or the Taleban if they are planning an attack on Bahgram. Leaking either secret is an equal crime, the additional charge of "aiding" with the latter is the cherry added on top.

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Devil

Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

So what you're saying is any duly elected government can make and enforce any law it wants. Only when the people vote that government out, successfully revolt against it, or the Russians capture Berlin are those laws eviscerated.

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Re: Waterboarding? Suicide missions?

Franchises of what? Islam?

Thats about the only thing that links any of these so-called terrorist organisations, and even that could be considered a dubious and tenuous link. The term "Al Qaeda" (spelling may vary from one news source to another: clue) is a codename created by the CIA during the 1970's (When they were training the Taleban to fight the Commies) that refers to the database they kept of "international terrorist suspects". The IRA, for instance, were listed on the same Database (making them "Al Qaeda" in modern US intelligence parlance). Bin Laden never referred to himself or his organisation as "Al Qaeda", but as "The Muslim Brotherhood". Al Qaeda translates as (depending on dialect chosen) either "The Gentlemen" or "The Base" (Often used to mean Database).

There appears to be no "hierarchy" of terrorists, (for example, there is no provable link between 9/11 and the 7/7 attacks) but the Taleban is very influential in such circles as are various Saudi houses; the Bin Laden family for example. But they're allies and own quite a lot of US businesses, so we'd best not say that too loudly eh?

Makes the oft-repeated phrase "....group linked to Al Qaeda" kinda nonsensical really.

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Anonymous Coward

A perfect example of making bad choices

He mad bad choices and now he will be held accountable for his choices.

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Re: A perfect example of making bad choices

The allegation ndicates Wikileaks is an enemy of the state.

What a state to be in if that is true.

Truth is your enemy?

How can that be errrmmmm... tru....errr....

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Trollface

A folk song about him

From a dingy pub in brighton....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BG0mZmRHb0

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Anonymous Coward

Does he not have aspergers?

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Anonymous Coward

There are a lot of ignorant idiots commenting today.

No he shouldn't be shot!

But he shouldn't of disclosed any info.

I have had to sign the secrets act on more than one occasion, I can't tell you why but I can tell you that I take it very seriously even though I disagree with a few things that I have had to sign it for.

*So I now do what the government does, and leave some documents on the train.

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Black Helicopters

@AC 16:47

If you have had to sign the Official Secrets Act, then you will know that everyone is already bound by it, whether they have read a copy of it or not. The bit you sign is just a reminder of your existing obligations.

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Anonymous Coward

What bugs me about the OSA is that you have to sign it every time again. It's not like it expires or has a limited scope, so it tells me more about the state of admin of the people I had to work for - all want their own piece of paper..

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"What bugs me about the OSA is that you have to sign it every time again."

Consider it a reminder!

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WTF?

10pm - 5am. That's 8 hours of sleep, I normally get 6-7 during the week.

I'm not sure why they are complaining about that. It's probably more then he got in basic.

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Vic
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> 10pm - 5am. That's 8 hours of sleep

No it isn't...

Vic.

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Anonymous Coward

Oh, come on!

executing Manning is not going to deter a second Manning any more than the first dose of gonorrhea deters a second.

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Facepalm

Is This The Daily Mail?

Or a YouTube comments page?

My goodness... it brings out the nasties... Bring back the cat! Hanging's too good for 'em! Ship 'em all to an island somewhere! Yes, you're right: I grew up in the 1950s.

Seems to me that, assuming the facts fit the appearances (nobody has been tried yet) that this guy has committed a criminal act for which he can truly expect the old 15-ton weight on his head, but baying for blood is about as civilised as the US govt's treatment of the guy up to this point. Cruel and unusual? Barely civilised.

My bit of baying, although not for blood, is that the other guy should be on trial with him, no posing as a celebrity seeker of political asylum

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Re: Is This The Daily Mail?

This is a matter of military discipline. If you are a civvy you might not understand, but military discipline is particularly firm and often harsh, particularly where secrets are concerned. This is not a civilian matter where you can cry and talk about your harsh childhood; I have already posted up material showing that the Taliban have said that they will be having a word with those informants whose GPS data have been revealed. It is not up to Manning, you or anyone not in the strategic/military loop to decide on what secrets can be revealed, by definition. Practically all of the 'no harm done' waffle is mere hot air and I suspect that much if not all of it comes from spotty delinquents in their bedrooms.

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