back to article Android-loving suits boot BlackBerrys into 3rd place in the office

RIM's share of the business market continues to slide: new figures put BlackBerrys into third place behind Android and iOS as staff are increasingly allowed to use their preferred handsets for work. Only a third of the 1,600 firms surveyed globally provide smartphones for their employees, down from 58 per cent a year ago. …

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Flame

BYOD Policy

It's the easiest one to write, 2 twos words, ends in "Off"

It's the only way to remain secure

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Facepalm

Re: BYOD Policy

Easiest way to get a P45 too.

Like it or not, BYOD is not going away, and IT departments need to realize that. I remember the same attitudes to PC's from mainframe-loving IT departments in the 80's & 90's - we should be embracing new technologies, and new ways of using technology, not just saying "no".

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Meh

Re: BYOD Policy

@tirk

I don't know about embracing all new technologies, that sounds a bit too much like change for its own sake.

Any business or corporate environment is focused on productivity. Everything, from the admin procedures to the technology deployed, is about enabling or improving productivity.

If users can show that there's a demonstrable boost to productivity by having a BYOD policy (that doesn't also expose the company to ancillary problems) then that's a clear argument for bringing it in. A large part of the issue with BYOD policies is that they seem to be treated as self-evident truths, when that is not the case.

For instance:

it might be the case that allowing an employee to use their own machine improves their productivity because they have better computers/a better system environment for working. Or it might be that the people using their own machines are working more hours, but not really counting the extra hour or so per day that they do at home because they're on their own computer, at home, and they also browse Facebook/play games/watch iPlayer at the same time so it doesn't really feel like work.

Similarly, it might be the case that allowing someone to use their personal laptop for work rather than making them use a work desktop lets them work on the road more easily and be more productive re: client visits, etc. Or, it might be that they have a shiny laptop with no warranty and a load of piratey software on it that they use for work purposes and then land the company in hot water with because The BSA Sues Them For Using Piratey Software For Work/The Hard Drive Dies And They Hadn't Backed Up Any Of Their Work/Their Home Browsing Habits Lead To An Inopportune Image On Screen During A Client Presentation.

I don't have an answer here; but I do think that before deciding whether a technology is a good idea or not you have to identify an implementation plan and test it to evaluate its effect on productivity. Anything else is bad business management.

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Boffin

Re: BYOD Policy

The headlong rush into "The Cloud" suggests the mainframe-lovers were right all along.

Maybe organisations should listen to their IT departments...

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Silver badge
WTF?

Re: BYOD Policy

"Or, it might be that they have a shiny laptop with no warranty and a load of piratey software on it that they use for work purposes and then land the company in hot water with because.... "

These issues are easily fixed. I use my car for work, and the company check my licence directly with DVLA, ask to see MOT and insurance documents, and could (and should) extend that to seeing the service records. So in the unlikely event that I wanted to use my PC for work, I'd see them being within their rights asking me to prove that the software is under a valid licence, has suitable malware protection, allow monitoring what I do during working hours, and requiring that I use disk encryption and suitable password routines. Backup is something for the company to make work.

Personally I can't see many people wanting their personal hardware fouled with the repressive hand of corporate BOFHs, so the answer to BYOD isn't "no", but "yes of course, on our terms". Mind you, the BYOD problem arises largely because companies hand out such poor quality and restricted functionality kit in the first place. Fix that, and most of the pressure will go away.

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LPF

Oh Jesus

The faboi's are goign to go beserk!

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Anonymous Coward

BB has proven its security for years, roll on BYOD with IOS and Android and info leaks left right and centre.

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Go

Info leaks are the fault of IT

The solution is simple. WTF don't IT bods get it?

Treat corporate WiFi as an untrusted network, and allow BYOD on that only. The wired network is trusted. Identity between the two is federated (note that federation != OATH or OpenID), so that you protect your trusted environment's credentials.

That gives users access to email and SharePoint, which is what most use. With an application firewall (Unified Access Gateway, F5 BIG-IP, or similar) you redact the stuff you need to contain (yes, that means getting on top of your information architecture) and you're good to go.

The expensing comms thing is just f*cking ridiculous. If anyone wants to do BYOD where I work they cover their own comms costs, or they access a wired desktop. If they *need* remote/field -based access, they get a BB.

Simples.

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"BB has proven its security for years, roll on BYOD with IOS and Android and info leaks left right and centre."

Using my 3G panopticon, I can give you this exclusive breakdown of data content in all corporate email sent worldwide.

<1%: "The terrorists will have gathered at target site Echo by 21:00. The strike force will launch Operation Re-elect Freedom at 21:30, and exfil via RV Whiskey at 22:05. This briefing is on a need to know basis only."

<1%: "Heads up: GlobalCorp has decided to launch a takeover bid for MegaCorp for eleventy billion dollars. As we are the advisors to GlobalCorp this info should remain confidential"

>98%: "Sharon has brought some chocolate cake in for her birthday and it's in the kitchen. Also, if anyone finds Jerry's spare glasses can they drop them at reception. Thanks!"

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Reconcile?

"...claiming back the cost of connectivity on expenses"

"...getting staff to use their own connectivity is becoming an unmeasured expense in many businesses"

WTF? The only way it's not being measured is if it's not being claimed. If that's the case, why would the employer give a shit?

Seriously, who writes this shit?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Reconcile?

The employer would give a shit because they really don't want We_are_going_to_run_out_of_cash_in_three_months_or_less.doc and List_of_bribes_to_hide_in_the_accounts.xls being routinely downloaded on your possibly compromised connectivity to your possibly compromised device. This might result in the accidental starting of convert_shares_to_bogroll.exe and/or Put_the_board_in_bracelets.exe.

AC because I wouldn't want anyone linking the above thoughts to my employers, who are paragons of corporate virtue with share prices that dominate their competitors.

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Joke

Re: Reconcile?

"AC because I wouldn't want anyone linking the above thoughts to my employers, who are paragons of corporate virtue with share prices that dominate their competitors."

You work for Dixons?

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WTF?

Who else is FIPS certified (legitimate question)?

Management is the reason leaks and insecurity abounds. The IT staff would happily lock the shit down to the point that management and sales people would be complaining about how annoying it is to do things. It would be secure however. We get over-ruled by high muckety-mucks that don't have a clue and just like things to be simple... like them. The entire desktop/laptop/wireless networks should be untrusted, yes, but then the CFO or CSO complains that they need to be able to use their local bullshit email program to connect to the Exchange environment and be able to modify network stored docs locally. Fuck no! What's that? I'm fired? Oh, well here's your network access then.

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