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back to article SUN to GO OUT COMPLETELY: Here's how to watch online

At around 19:45 GMT on November 13th, the northern Australian city of Cairns will begin to experience a total solar eclipse, and we here at the Register's Australian bureau have chosen a couple of methods whereby our round-the-globe-round-the-clock readership can join in the excitement and watch the sun go out online. Complete …

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I can only close my eyes and imagine what the absence of sunlight will look like.

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Ah - but you also have to imagine the dawn sky completely surrounding the horizon, the sudden sensation of cold, the increased breeze, the bizarre texture to the light just before totality and all the other bits and pieces you get with a total eclipse...

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Worth travelling to see.

In 1999 I drove across Europe to see one, in 2006, I flew to Turkey to see another.

Both occasions were well worth the journey

Those of you down under - enjoy!

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Go

Re: Worth travelling to see.

Absolutely! In 2002 I drove across the desert to see the total eclipse in South Australia. It was fantastic, as was the accompanying four-night-and-day festival.

Do as icon says.

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"At around 18:45 GMT on November 13th..."

... it will be pitch dark in the UK too.

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Anonymous Coward

Sun

Imagine my disappointment when I discovered that this article was not about Larry Ellison.

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Happy

We once had a one in a billion year total Eclipse over Melbourne Australia

The full, total, absolute, TOTAL ECLIPSE - a once in a billion year event, aligned perfectly to the millimeter, over the exact center of our house, in Melbourne Australia - about 35 years ago....

Of course, rather than get all excited and get the gear and go stand in the middle of the park, with a welding mask on and or a pin hole camera etc., rampant dumb fuck arsehole father, decided that going to visit his idiot inlaws that day, half way across the state.... was a much better idea.

Just to think that was only 300K away from the total eclipse - and it just ruined everything.

35 years later, he is still an arsehole.

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Happy

Re: We once had a one in a billion year total Eclipse over Melbourne Australia

BUT you got to live in Melbourne. Swings & roundabouts, mate.

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Unhappy

Pay

I happened to be in Cornwall for the 1999 one and it was genuinely impressive. Sorry, but a live video stream will be a very poor substitute.

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Happy

Re: Pay

The Cornwall one (or in my case, Devon) was OK, but the sun was covered by cloud.

The Turkey one in 2006 was much more impressive - watching from the harbour of Antalya, with a beer in my hand....

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I was in Looe for the '99. Also cloudy, but I did see the shadow roll in off the sea, which was mightily impressive. The birds started to sing and light level change was proper spooky.

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I was visiting my brother in Augsburg for the 1999 one; a cloudy day, but the sky cleared up just before the thing started to get going. We had a brilliant garden party, and somehow the Door's "The End" came on the stereo just as totality was happening.

Incredible day. The memory still makes me smile.

Enjoy, Southrons!

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Headmaster

Re: Pay

Sorry. The Doors' "The End", I meant. I know someone's going to pick up on that...

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Re: Pay

"The Doors' "The End", I meant. I know someone's going to pick up on that..."

Usually it's a sign of the apostrocalypse

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Unhappy

Bloody favouritism!

How come Cairns was chosen to host the eclipse?

I'll bet their poxy video stream won't be as professional as the 1972 Audio Recording from Lord's Cricket ground.

A pity about the rain though.

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Wrong end of stick

When I read the headline I thought that Oracle were finally pulling the plug...

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The most amazing thing about the 1999 one...

I went across to Romania for the 1999 one to get that precious extra minute or so of totality and was rewarded with clear skies.

But the part that I found was most fascinating occurred *before* totality as the sun was gradually reduced to a crescent.

We were watching on the edge of a forest with dappled sunlight under the canopy of leaves. As we watched each dapple changed shape into a perfect crescent.

I had always assumed that the shapes in dappled sunlight were due to ... you know... the shapes left by the gaps in the leaves. But apparently the leaves form myriad pinhole cameras projecting the shape of the sun. Quite quite magical, I have some photos somewhere.

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Happy

but it not on the 13th

international dateline anyone?

looks like the 14th @ 18.45

humph

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Re: but it not on the 13th

Nope 13th in the UK, but it looks like it'll be 20:38 rather than 19:38.

I have a different live stream open (19:25 GMT at time of writing) and it has a countdown of about 1h 10 minutes displayed. Stay tuned!

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Unhappy

19:38

Are you sure it 19:38 GMT - Ive just checked the live feed and it shows just over an hour on the countdown?

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Re: 19:38

I think someone's confused by daylight saving time - during the (southern) winter Queensland is on the same time as Sydney, but in summer Qld doesn't put their clocks forward. It's actually 20:38 GMT.

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Pint

View from Darwin

Here: http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa307/darkstar-auctions/PB142322.png

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Waste of Electrons

I've only been around for a partial eclipse (Northern Ontario, forget what year), but even that was pretty mind blowing.

What's even more incredible though is that anyone would bother watching an eclipse on the Internet.

Honestly folks, how dismal can things get?

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