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back to article Singapore gov think tank plots SSD takedown

The Data Storage Institute (DSI), one of the many research groups at Singapore's Agency for Science, Technology and research (A*STAR), has taken the wraps off a hybrid disk drive said to consume less power than a comparable solid state disk while also being small and light enough enough to satisfy Intel's specs for use in …

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Trollface

The thinnest storage for your ultrabook... use the A: drive.

Might be best if they pick a different name to market it under... A-Drive smacks too much of floppies for my liking.

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A: drive

wasn't that not only the floppy, but the trade name of some high-capacity removable?

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Happy

Re: A: drive

Nicely ironic name if you ask me. It's about the same size as a floppy disk, but stores about six hundred thousand times more about ten thousand times faster. I can think of worse adverts.

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I don't get this. Tablets and smartphones store up to @32GB, yet it's oh so important for our other portable devices to be able to store 1TB?

Give me solid state in my portables, please.

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Boffin

Best of both worlds?

If you never use more than 32Gb this drive will behave like an SSD, because everything you store will be cached in the solid-state part. The difference is that you won't run out should you want to store more. The stuff that you store and subsequently don't refer to for a long time will "disappear" into the magnetic disk. The stuff that is active will be solid-state cached.

Should be the best of both worlds.

Especially if it can tolerate complete failure of the flash cache, and revert to being a magnetic-only disk. Anyone know? The failure mode of solid-state memory is reportedly often to stop working in a flash (sorry). Magnetic disks can also fail like that, but more often degrade progressively and gracefully giving plenty of time to copy your data elsewhere.

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SSD Failure

I've had two SSD's go titsup on me. In both cases the data remained acessible but the drive would only mount as read-only. This was Linux however, not sure what would happen for Windows.

I'm not saying this is how all SSD's will fail of course. As always YMMV

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