back to article One in seven North American home networks full of malware

One in seven home networks in North America are infected with malware, a recent study has revealed. Half the threats detected during Q3 2012 were made up of spam-spewing zombies or banking Trojans while the remainder were mostly adware and other lesser threats, according to a study by Kindsight Security Labs. The study was based …

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Anonymous Coward

It's

All down to the quality of their education.

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WTF?

WTF

How can Americans be *this* dumb?

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Re: WTF

Massive assumption: the results are accurate and not "45 minutes" sexed-up bullshit.

It's not just the USA, it's everywhere. Computers are like cars, almost everyone uses them but very few understand how they work or are capable of even basic maintenance. The analogy with cars goes even further given than it is increasingly difficult to do work on a car without access to specialist equipment, and in the computer world it is increasingly difficult to replace parts without access to specialist equipment.

The other big issue is the homogeneous nature of most networks. Windows all the way down and suffering all the ills that brings. Although it is interesting how Linux is now being infected (Android is a Linux, remember).

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Re: WTF

Android is not "a Linux", it's just the Linux kernel bolted to some sick insecure userspace, designed by people not understanding the basic problems of software security.

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FAIL

Re: WTF

@Christian Berger - Android is not "GNU/Linux" as it has no GNU components. It does run a patched version of the Linux kernel (and I believe those patches are being mainstreamed). This makes it "a Linux" or, to give it its full name "Android/Linux" or possibly "Goog/Linux".

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Timely

And to think only a few days ago we were wondering why spam levels were so low after Sandy.

Still, I can't recommend it as a solution. Given a choice, I'd rather deal with the spam and have the several hundred people back, thanks. (Hullo, ghod? Are you listening up there?)

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Re: Timely

If the analysis is accurate, report the supernodes and have the ISPs block them until resolved.

If the analysis is accurate...

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TDSS Alureon

Is a *bastard* to remove.....

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Pirate

Do it the American way

Send the local sheriff round and get him to "Pop a Cap" in the offending piece of hardware.......

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Anonymous Coward

I'm glad I'm not the sad type of pedant who would feel obliged to add a comment just to point out that 13% is (approx) one in eight, not one in seven.

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FAIL

Not clicking that

"Kindsight therefore has a vested interest in talking up the malware threat..."

That's not what's tainting the results. Most people would never install Kindsight's software. Those that would have likely installed many worse things.

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Anonymous Coward

"Most people would never install Kindsight's software."

I may be wrong, but I was under the impression that the software being installed here was run centrally by the ISP.

Certainly that's what UK ISPs NTL (big) and Metronet (LITTLE) and maybe others used to do in the days when they each had a separate facility to centrally monitor some customer traffic and put the customer in a "walled garden" till things were sorted out if certain virus-related signs were spotted in their traffic.

'Course that requires ISPs with a bit of a clue, and a bit of motivation, and the UK ISP market is largely dominated by the race for the gutter these days.

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Correlations

There's probably a strong correlation between people who use an ISP which takes part in such a "Phorm" attack, and don't tunnel out their traffic to a trusted ISP, and people who have malware on their systems. So the measurement is skewed, at least a bit.

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