Feeds

back to article Yale finds second diamond planet

Astronomy has turned up a second diamond planet, and it’s a relative neighbor to the solar system – a mere 40 light-years distant, circling 55 Cancri. Unlike the diamond planet discovered by Australian astronomers last year, this one didn’t even need a pulsar’s gravity to give it the squeeze. It inherited its mostly-carbon …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Silver badge

Obligatory XKCD planets image: http://xkcd.com/1071/

I should really be doing my boring webapp...

2
0
Anonymous Coward

Sciene

This is very interesting and I really do enjoy reading about this new planet. Of the many planets in space, through the darkness, this planet stands among many we are on the brink of discovering! It is truly a discovery of scientific attainment, I hope to see more of these discoveries soon

0
0

Headline for tomorrow

DeBeers unexpectedly dumps all available resources into interstellar travel and heat treated mining equipment

6
0

Re: Headline for tomorrow

Love that - my first thought was DeBeers must be s******* themselves

0
0
Anonymous Coward

My Precious

5
0

I saw it first

I will be sending a nuke in to blow a hole in the center. I think it'll make a lovely ring for my wife.

1
0
Silver badge
Mushroom

"I think it'll make a lovely ring for my wife"

Just how big is your wife? And just how long do you think you'll stay married after she sees that comment?

0
0
Bronze badge

DeBeers and....

Weyland Industries/Weyland-Yutani, hahahahaha

1
0
Happy

Diamonds are forever

Would make a great Bond song! Oh wait.... :)!

0
0
Happy

Come on el reg.

What's its mass in carrots? Proper units please.

0
0
Coat

Re: Come on el reg.

In carrots it would feed all the wabbits (goats and piggies) on earth for thousands of generations to come..

In Carats, it would certainly put a smile on the faces of women and men for thousands of generations too..

1
0
Facepalm

Re: Come on el reg.

Carrots? I think you mean carats

0
0
Happy

Re: Come on el reg.

Not really...

If there was so much abundance of the stuff then it would in effect become worthless.

Diamonds would be as valuable as sand.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Why are they all different?

I'm sure the combined brain power of el reg is enough for this question...

Why are planets apparently all so different? I recognise that distance from their star will make the general temperature and volatility of the planets different, but even in our own solar system we see widely varying chemical composition from the innermost to the outermost. Why, in the random spatterings across the universe, didn't each planet end up more or less the same chemically?

There, answer that.

0
0
Thumb Up

Re: Why are they all different?

Conjecture 1: It's a result of the way the solar systems form and evolve over time; denser elements tend to fall in towards the centre more, resulting in rocky planets nearer the sun and gas giants further out, perhaps? I've always envisaged it rather like shaking up muddy silt with water in a jam jar and leaving it to settle into layers, but jam jars don't generally have a thermonuclear furnace in the bottom so the model isn't perfect...

Conjecture 2: Because that's the way Jesus wants it to be.

1
0

Re: Why are they all different?

IANAA (i am not an astrophysicist)

For everything to be created the same the raw materials and forces required would have to be uniformly distributed throughout the universe, as it was kicked off by an explosion I find this an unlikely scenario

the above is IMHO

0
0

Re: Why are they all different?

Because stars are basically chemical element spewers. All precious metal and a lot more things higher up the periodic table than hydrogen and helium are naturalyy created when stars are either born or just exploded. I'm now asking you if a god would bother with the whole mucky process on day 4.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Why are they all different?

As the asker of the question, let's get the God thing out of the way. God didn't do it. We created him, not the other way round.

Stars do indeed spew heavy elements out all over the place, rather randomly it would appear. So why, in general, don't they end up randomly distributed? How is it that carbon in diamond form can appear, as far as we know, fairly sparsely across our solar system, yet apparently makes up most of a planet elsewhere? How come the inner rocky planets do have atmospheres but aren't gas giants themselves? There must be a reason (a natural one, god didn't do it, I've told you once) or a bunch or reasons, but I've never seen someone like Cox or Moore or Sagan explain it. Maybe they did and I missed it. I should watch more television.

0
0
Silver badge

It's only 40ly away!

You could be there an back in a lifetime!

(Lifetimes may be as long as 80 years as seen from by an observer on Earth. Observers in other inertial frames of reference may vary.)

0
0
Bronze badge

How fast?

If this planet is orbiting its host star in 18 hours how god damn fast is it going?! Is it fast enough to be affected by relativity, I mean GPS satellites are slightly so presumably it is?

I would try and work it out myself but the amount of swearing may give away the fact I'm not working...

0
0

Old news...

Hawkwind Log Book, 1971 - http://www.starfarer.net/HWLog.pdf

0
0
Happy

Step 1: Claim the planet.

Step 2: Take out a loan with your rather HUGE diamond as collateral. A few billion USD should be enough.

Step 3: Hide the money.

Step 4: Let the bank foreclose.

Step 5: Withdraw money.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.