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back to article Fuming fanbois flood 'flimsy iPhone 5 Wi-Fi' forum

Punters on an Apple support forum claim they are struggling to use Wi-Fi networks with their iOS 6 gadgets. The trouble seems to affect new iPhone 5s as well as iPads and older iPhones updated to the latest version of Apple's mobile operating system. Users of iOS 6, writing under a headline "iPhone 5 wifi issues", reported a …

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Anonymous Coward

Hahahaha HAHAHAHAHAHAHA hahahahaha...

(Grabbing BIG box of popcorn)

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Anonymous Coward

Woah, hold on there...

At least the phone can't be cropped over to factory reset remotely unlike some other major manufactuer of the robotic type.

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If your post is meant to laugh at those who have WiFi problems...

they won't be able to read it anyway.

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Re: Woah, hold on there...

"At least the phone can't be cropped over to factory reset remotely unlike some other major manufactuer of the robotic type."

If you're going to Android bash, do it properly. The latest phones were all patched up before the exploit was publicised. This is all available on XDA.

However, a lefitimate put down on Android would focus on some operators not bothering to roll out this update to their phones because they couldn't be arsed.

Let me redo what you've said:

"At least the phone can't be cropped over to factory reset remotely unlike some other major manufactuer of the robotic type if their phone was resold through a carrier that couldn't be arsed to push updates to the phones in a timely manner."

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Facepalm

Remind me again why people buy Tranche 1 tech products, before all the issues are resolved?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Woah, hold on there...

Actually, no, they weren't patched before the exploit was publicised

I've personally tested on an HTC One X, and a Samsung S3 in the last few days, it worked on both.

Have you done any testing? Or just read forums and think you understand?

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Re: Woah, hold on there...

Um, that one was fixed with an update. Lets see how long this one takes to fix. And lets not forget the maps.

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Anonymous Coward

"Just use Android, not that big of a deal."

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Headmaster

Re: Woah, hold on there...

"I've personally tested on an HTC One X, and a Samsung S3 in the last few days, it worked on both."

Since it was an exploit with Touchwiz, getting it to work on a HTC is pretty good going!

1 weeks detention in France for you!

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FAIL

Re: Woah, hold on there...

Wrong, it's a fault in Android's telephone number recogniser code. It's been patched in the core Android build, but not rolled out to all handsets yet.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Woah, hold on there...

"Actually, no, they weren't patched before the exploit was publicised

I've personally tested on an HTC One X, and a Samsung S3 in the last few days, it worked on both."

Personally yes, I've tested on an S3 (not affected) and an S2 (affected) - although the S2 update hasn't been pushed yet apparently.

The point you should take away from this is your, or my results are irrelevant in answering the question "were the phones patched" because there are far too many variables. I wish people would realise this before threads end up with hundreds of "mine's vulnerable, it's a lie", "mine's not, it's not a lie" type of pointless arguments. For example:

What country are you in? What network are you on? What revision is your phone? What build is your OS? Is the phone an operator phone or just bundled by a 3rd party with an operator package? etc. etc. etc.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Woah, hold on there...

"Wrong, it's a fault in Android's telephone number recogniser code. It's been patched in the core Android build, but not rolled out to all handsets yet."

Wrong, it's manufactures overriding the default dialler behaviour of waiting for user confirmation before dialling a number supplied by a 3rd party application. Then adding in special USSD codes to allow wiping of devices. 1+1=vulnerability.

Stock Android has always (I've just tested this on a HTC Magic running 1.6) prompted the user before dialling a number supplied by a 3rd party application.

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Anonymous Coward

Hahahaha HAHAHAHAHAHAHA hahahahaha... (Grabbing BIG box of popcorn)

A manic laughing empty headed donkey, must be a mid-range android user!

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Anonymous Coward

Apple "bad bad users, its all your fault. You aren't using the Iphone correctly"

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Re: Hahaha! Don't laugh too hard ...

or you may choke on your popcorn.

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Re: Woah, hold on there...

""I've personally tested on an HTC One X, and a Samsung S3 in the last few days, it worked on both."

Since it was an exploit with Touchwiz, getting it to work on a HTC is pretty good going!"

That would be because it WASN'T an exploit with Touchwiz .....

That was also kind of my point, that you entirely missed :)

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All tech products are Tranche 1

All tech products are Tranche 1 nowadays and riddled with faults, both soft and hard. A couple of half arsed patches to silence press grumblings and it's on to the next big thing. My last couple of purchases (Transformer Prime and iPhone 4s) resulted in deep self loathing. Once that subsides, no doubt I'll be seduced by the next shiny piece of crap.

http://www.theonion.com/video/sony-releases-new-stupid-piece-of-shit-that-doesnt,14309/

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Stop

Re: Woah, hold on there...

@AC #1. "At least the phone can't be cropped over to factory reset remotely unlike some other major manufactuer of the robotic type."

You missed the point. Apple likes to pretend their product are perfect and just "work". Apple works hard to maintain that persona and the iSheep believe every word Apple says like God talking to Moses. Of course I realize not everyone who uses Apple products is an iSheep because they do make a good product. The ones I'm laughing at are the ones who actually believe Apple is perfect and can do no wrong and that owning their products somehow makes you better.

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Go

Re: All tech products are Tranche 1

"All tech products are Tranche 1 nowadays and riddled with faults, both soft and hard... My last couple of purchases (Transformer Prime and iPhone 4s) resulted in deep self loathing. Once that subsides, no doubt I'll be seduced by the next shiny piece of crap."

That's only true because you make it true yourself. Sit back: Wait, watch, find the product that works properly in the wild and let track record seduce you rather than the glitz of a new product, and then let the prices half when rumours of the new one come out. You end up with a good product, for half the price.

Two years ago you didn't need a phone that you could speak to and it could reply by telling you where the nearest curry house was*, so what changed on the i4s announcement that *made* you need it?

If rush-buying isn't making you happy and giving you the product you want, then take a step back from it.

I've got a great phone, that works, that cost a quarter of the price of friend's phones and that will last me at least three years... all because I wasn't in a rush to get something the moment it was released, and had no particular product bias in mind when purchasing.

*Unless you are in the UK, and then it can't...

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Anonymous Coward

What's the chances they're just holding the phone wrong?

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Bronze badge

It's got to be that because Apple products "just work".

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Trollface

Let's try this again

This is exactly like that sticking USB-connector non-issue. Wireless networking is notoriously subjective and finicky. All kinds of things, from industrial generators to adult toys, can cause a lot of interference. Most of the current wireless APs use the unfinished 'N' standard, potentially causing compatibility issues with future hardware - just like it seems happened in this case. I bet that WiFi works just fine for people who use the current generation of Apple Time Capsule. Some people, like the Reg, will always blame Apple, even though there's plenty of other hardware that can potentially be blamed. Either make sure all your WiFi hardware is standard-compliant or find yourself another phone. This isn't Apple's problem..

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Re: Let's try this again

" This isn't Apple's problem.."

WTF are you talking about??? Of COURSE it's Apple's problem!\

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Bronze badge

Re: Let's try this again

@solidsoup

Yes, 802.11n was in draft for 4 years and that is kind of funny, but it got finalized in 2009.

It's 2012 this year FYI.

And I know, I know, Netgear still can't manage to do 802.11n without it dropping or something. I think that's why some mischievous little bastard recommended them to Virgin to make SuperHubs.

(I bought some high end Netgear equipment in late 2011 and that had great throughput, but mysteriously once every 15 mins or so the signal would drop, no issues on other kit it was Netgear's fault.)

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Happy

Re: Let's try this again

Sarcasm, hence the icon. The post is exactly like the sarcastic one I made ab. USB issue. With similar results :P

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Most of the current wireless APs use the unfinished 'N' standard

Nope. 802.11n has been ratified quite a while ago (and most Draft n devices got a firmware update).

"causing compatibility issues with future hardware "

Utter nonsense. If a new device claims compatibility with 11n then it has to work with 11n, period. If it doesn't then it's defective.

"just like it seems happened in this case."

Seems you have no f*****g clue what you're talking about.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Let's try this again

Neither the latest ipad or iphone 4s will connect to my g wireless network. Everything else does! It's an Apple problem.

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Trollface

Re: Let's try this again

Maybe sarcasm standards are not finalized yet?

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jai
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inaccurate headline

new iPhone 5s as well as iPads and older iPhones

So actually, it's an iOS6 issue then, not iPhone 5 specifically?

Such poor reporting is to be expected in the hoi poloi presses, but this is a technical news website, one would hope that the reporter was at least a little bit technically literate to understand these things.

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Re: inaccurate headline

I thought the article made that perfectly clear. The headline section that you're referring to is in quotes, further clarified in the article text as being the title of the forum on the Apple discussion site. If the whinging fanbois get it wrong, why should they be misquoted?

Maybe you're the one with literacy problems.

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jai
Silver badge

Re: inaccurate headline

I thought the article made that perfectly clear. The headline section that you're referring to is in quotes, further clarified in the article text as being the title of the forum on the Apple discussion site. If the whinging fanbois get it wrong, why should they be misquoted?

But that's not the case. The forum title is "iPhone 5 wifi issues" (as mentioned within the article).

But the headline quotes this as "flimsy iPhone 5 Wi-Fi"

Anna has taken the liberty of capitalising and hyphenating the word wifi AND adding the word 'flimsy' to the front in order to further her own anti-Apple agenda. If she's not going to quote the name of the forum correctly in the headline, then why bother quoting it at all, and instead could accurately represent the facts within the headline, instead of using 'iPhone 5' to artificially draw in clicks and Google search results.

As you say, the article itself is fine - it's the headline i've taken exception to as that's where the errors are.

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Stop

Re: to further her own anti-Apple agenda

There's as many people on here claiming The Register loves Apple (because of the 90% in the iPhone review) as there are claiming they have an anti-Apple agenda.

Could it be that you are the one with the agenda and the site is actually refreshing cynical about all manufacturers?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: inaccurate headline

Its a report that states that, on the iphone 5 forum, there are reports of wifi issues.

It also states that it is not only an iphone problem (even though there are reports on the iphone forum).

Why ado you find this so difficult to understand?

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Joke

@AC

"Why ado you find this so difficult to understand?"

Well, I suppose it could be possible his iphone only picked up bits and pieces from the conversation due to connectivity issues.

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Coat

@jai

Well if you've got your iPhone 5 running iOS 5 without any WiFi problems, then bully for you, but all the other iPhone 5 users seem to have iOS 6.

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Re: inaccurate headline

"So actually, it's an iOS6 issue then, not iPhone 5 specifically?"

It seems to be.

I experienced this problem when I upgraded an iPad to iOS 6. However, not being content with just grousing about it, and having the problem on my home WiFi network but not on other WiFi networks, I set out to do some trial and error to try to track down exactly what was happening.

First bit of faffing quickly showed that the problem went away if I used WPA or WEP encryption or no encryption at all, but appeared if I used WPA2.

I'd also been having trouble with my Mac desktop losing signal from my home router, so replaced the router for that reason and found--surprise!--that the connectivity problems with the iPad went away, even with WPA2.

So I invited a bunch of friends with various gizmos over and played a game of swap-the-routers, and here's what I found:

iPhone 5 running iOS 6:

Would not connect to an Asus router with WPA2. Would connect with WPA or WEP, or no security.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

iPad running iOS 5:

Connected to an Asus router with WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Same iPad running iOS 6:

Would not connect to an Asus router with WPA2. Would connect with WPA or WEP, or no security; signal always showed as weak.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

iMac running OS X 10.6.8:

Would not connect reliably to an Asus router with WPA2. (connection dropped every fifteen minutes or so.) Would connect with WPA or WEP, or no security, but with some reliably problems.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

iMac running OS X 10.8.1:

Would not connect to an Asus router with WPA2. Would connect with WPA or WEP, or no security, but the connection dropped often.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Dell laptop running Windows 7 (Home, I think)

Would not connect to an Asus router *at all*, regardless of security settings. Tried everything.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Dell laptop running Windows Vista; internal WiFi broken, using a cheapie no-name WiFi dongle:

Connected to an Asus router with WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

No-name desktop running Windows XP:

Connected to an Asus router with WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Dell desktop running Windows 7 home:

Connected to an Asus router with WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Nintendo Wii:

Would not connect to an Asus router with WPA2. Did connect with WPA or WEP, but connection kept dropping.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Sony Playstation 3:

Connected to an Asus router with WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected with a Netgear router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Connected to a Linksys router using WPA2, WPA, and WEP.

Conclusions:

1. Yes, there is a problem in iOS 6. For me, at least, it seems related to WPA2 on certain routers. Folks aren't making it up; the problem is there.

2. The router/WPA2 combination problem isn't (necessarily) unique to Apple.

3. Asus routers are a bit rubbish.

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Holmes

Something to do with AP location fixing, surely

the phone can't tell where the AP is.

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Trollface

Re: Something to do with AP location fixing, surely

Good point, given the questionable ability of the maps application it may be worth getting users to check if they are actually where they think they are. The missing access points could be put down to being in the wrong house, street, city, country etc...

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Anonymous Coward

weird

There always seems to be a panic over fubar wifi for every major phone release. My S3 didn't suffer the apparently widespread problems, and my iPad 3 is fine with Wifi under iOS6 too (though something horrible seems to have happened to the maps app).

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Re: weird

It wouldn't be an Apple OS if you didn't have to wait till MacOS X 10.x.2 or iOS x.1 to get stable wifi, even if it worked perfectly the previous release.

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Anonymous Coward

Tim Cook answered this guy's plea !

http://bpmredux.wordpress.com/2012/09/24/tim-cook-shows-youre-never-to-big-to-respond-to-the-little-guy/

You've got to raise it with Apple directly, their Support Forums are just awash with self-serve advice. Unless you get an AppleCare reference then it won't get looked at. Plus the original wifi issues were drowned out with the website ping.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Tim Cook answered this guy's plea !

That article is a bit strange. What evidence does the guy have that the email was on a computer anywhere near Tim Cook?

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Re: Tim Cook answered this guy's plea !

Err...because it was sent to Tim directly and he forwarded it to the Apple Exec Relations team in Ireland !

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Tim Cook answered this guy's plea !

Yes, you sent it to Tim Cook's email address. How do you know that it didn't hit someone employed to deal with his email who kicked it to the care team? Your post doesn't seem to explain.

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Anonymous Coward

No problems on iPhone 4S and iOS6

It was just the initial page thingy where Apple forgot to switch a page on. :-)

It's working perfectly fine now.

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Trollface

Silly iSheep...

It's a 'feature'.

Wireless Auto-Drop. © Apple - Patent Pending. All Rights Reserved.

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Trollface

Re: Silly iSheep...

I hear they're going to sue other devices makers with bad WiFi but so far no one has done as bad.

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404
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Re: Silly iSheep...

heh... saves resources thus maximizing battery life, just have to tweak it a little...

;)

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Where are these fuming fanbois, eh?

They're certainly not flooding the Macintosh Achinaea Forum in Ars Technica - which is where the reasonably knowledgeable Apple folk congregate. I'm pretty sure if there was a really widespread issue it would have been mentioned there.

So is there a real, intrinsic, problem? Or is it just the law of large numbers throwing out the tiny fraction of the millions of new iPhone 5 owners who do have some discrete manufacturing issue (and add those who just don't know how to set up a WiFi network)?

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WTF?

Re: Where are these fuming fanbois, eh?

I'm not sure I understand your question, are you saying the problem doesn't exist because it hasn't been posted on your particular haunt. Or are the 'smart' patrons of said haunt not familiar with hyperlinks?

Either way, https://discussions.apple.com/thread/4322714?tstart=0

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