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back to article Opportunity finds new patch of 'berries' on Mars

The Curiosity rover kept trundling away over the weekend, with NASA reporting the vehicle has now moved 142 meters. More exciting Martian action over the weekend took place at a spot NASA calls “an outcrop called Kirkwood in the Cape York segment of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.” Ye Olde Opportunity rover is still hard at …

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Already in the berries

Full speed ahead!

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Anonymous Coward

Apparently

It is now picking apples off the tree it found.

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so, in a nutshell:

THERE WAS LIFE ON MARS!

The most important part omitted... Freaking great news though!

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Re: so, in a nutshell:

Wouldn't go as far as that, but the likelyhood of life as a process having developed on mars seems increasingly probable, even though it would most likely never have progressed past what we would class as bacteria.

There's plenty of "extremofiles" here on earth whose ancestry (and internal chemistry) goes way past us young whippersnappers of eukaryotes, and would be quite happy to live under conditions that Old Mars would have had if there were sufficient bodies of water. (for less specifically boffin-rish inclined , think black smokers on our ocean floors, and the fact that those ecosystems run on chemotrophic bacteria)

Given that those energy schemes and cellular pathways developed well before even "snowball earth" happened, there's good hope on that front. It won't be little green men, but proof of *any* form of extraterrestrial life would be...well... a good thing.

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Headmaster

Re: so, in a nutshell:

These spherules aren't exclusively produced by bacteria. Other processes also create them, such as electrical discharges, meteorite impacts and simple water deposition.

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Re: so, in a nutshell:

Which methods of creations are rather distinct and different. A lot of things depend on the substrate it is found on/in and a host of other variables, some of which the rover is not equipped to measure to begin with.

Pedantism aside, the *least* this find gives us is an indication of a logical landing site if we ever get people to go all the way there. There's Interesting Stuff there which needs Looking At.

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Anonymous Coward

Opportunity had it easy.

Poor old Spirit (RIP) had quite a hard time. A bug in the software nearly killed it in the early days, but they patched it remotely. Even a stuck wheel couldn't stop Spirit from trekking on in search of interesting stuff. Then it was ordered to go mountaineering and eventually it got stuck in a patch of soft sand sloping away from the winter sun. It struggled on for a while in a new job as a stationary science outpost, but it was all too much for the old rover.

Opportunity landed pretty much right on a patch of "Blueberries", had the software patched before any problems appeared, found what looked like sedimentary rock, trundled over relatively easy terrain, and is still alive today.

Some rovers lead a charmed life. Lets hope Curiosity does too.

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Re: Opportunity had it easy.

I like to think that one day a manned mission will rescue Spirit, patch it up, stick it in a sunny spot.

If ever there was a machine that deserved to be revered..

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Alien

@Dave 62

I for one would totally support a manned Mars Mission even if its only goal was to do just that.

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Anonymous Coward

of course these are the eggs of silicon based lifeforms. Do not shoot it.

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Megaphone

We come in peace...

...shoot to kill, shoot to kill!

I think I still have the vinyl single somewhere...

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Re: We come in peace...

Momentarily, our resident school bully lost all credibility after singing a version of that song live on radio 210. He used his fists and a wooden knife he had fashioned in CDT to sadly regain it.

I realise that doesn't add a lot to this debate.

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Happy

Get your Martian Blueberry Jam right here!!!!

Lovely! Rich in iron!

C.M.O.T. Dibbler would try that.

These old rovers (hopefully) never cease to amaze. I once pointed out Mars to my kids, and added: there are two robot cars driving about on that planet. Now they want to be space scientists

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Re: Get your Martian Blueberry Jam right here!!!!

"C.M.O.T. Dibbler would try that."

It depends on whether you can get it to stay onna stick.

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Re: It depends on whether you can get it to stay onna stick.

Jam will stay "inna bun"

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Joke

Re: It depends on whether you can get it to stay onna stick.

Which shirley leads to the question:

How does Bob Marley like his doughnuts?

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Linux

Re: Get your Martian Blueberry Jam right here!!!!

OOOOOOOkkk!

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Unhappy

Re: Get your Martian Blueberry Jam right here!!!!

It depends on whether you can get it to stay onna stick.

Oh for...I've been reading Terry Pratchett for years, and I've just got that.

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Three successful rover missions in less than ten years suggests that the last few members of the 'Keep Earth Special Club' have finally retired - or better still, died - without passing the disease onto their younger colleagues.

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Devil

in other news on Mars in the news

huge alien rovers destroying our cities! 10 million dead.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: in other news on Mars in the news

Daily Mars headline:

Gay paedophile gypsy immigrant rovers trigger drop in house prices

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Anonymous Coward

Can someone please page

Charles Shults already, his page is back up now.

Seems he theorised way back that the original rover images showed clear evidence of fossils, but NASA never officially recognised his work.

Cover up anyone?

AC/DC

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Trollface

They're not blueberries - they're Martian Bunny droppings...

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