back to article Indian gov bans bulk texts as workers flee Bangalore

The Indian government has been forced to ban the sending of bulk SMS text messages over concerns migrant workers from the nation's north-east will be targeted by Muslims. Violent clashes in the state of Assam between the indigenous Bodo community and Muslim settlers from Bangladesh have left scores dead and displaced hundreds of …

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Anonymous Coward

How

Will they make workers redundant then?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: How

Easy, just convince them some more that their workplace is one big riot. And that they have to eat processed packaged food like their Western clients because all the cooks are rioting too ;)

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A Mobile In Every Hand scheme to provide phones to over six million of the poorest households

Just what the poor need, a smart phone to be able to twitter what they haven't had for dinner. At least it is a new twist to the usual crap.

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Actually very useful

No need for a smartphone, and it lets the poor access information about health, services, credit etc (via various sms-on-steroids options specifically developed for this sort of thing)

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Or to be able to buy the cheapest stuff for their farm, and sell the stuff for the best price; or browse recruitment sites to find jobs, and contact potential employers to arrange interviews.

My only concern is that £133.33 per handset seems pretty expensive.

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Re: Actually very useful

Sure. Information about credit that they can't get, and health services that they can't afford. Very useful, indeed!

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Re: Actually very useful

Think microFinance, not £250,000 mortgage-style credit. The point of microCredit schemes is that they allow the very poor to access small amounts of credit which they CAN afford (and advice as well), and which can make amazing differences to their lives. microFinance is for those people who want/need $20/$50/$100, far less then a traditional bank is interested in, and helps them avoid the extortion of the village moneylender. There have been some problems with it in India with scumbags moving in and ripping off the poor, but in many countries it's very succesful - have a look at http://www.kiva.org - and perhaps even lend $25 to a fisherman in Kenya or a coffee grower in Honduras.

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Anonymous Coward

I read it too quickly and thought it said "a missile in every hand" ;)

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WTF?

'strong bench strenth'???

WTF does "The tech industry in Bangalore generally has strong bench strength" mean? The call-centre drones all sit on long solid oak seats rather than office chairs?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 'strong bench strenth'???

IT is referring to their ability to do bench-presses at work.

The cause of this was a mis-translation some years ago when management thought all call centre staff should be given training on dealing with customers who have been left waiting for wait a long time - the subsequent 'wait training' initiative has been incorrectly implemented as 'weight training' ever since.

Obvious when you think about it.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 'strong bench strenth'???

goodness gracious me

And here at the Narora Atomic Power Station in Uttar Pradesh we have worlds best practice Fish in Meltdown training

very much fun melting those fishes,

don't you worry about any blowups here

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Re: 'strong bench strenth'???

That's management new-speak for 'we are running far under capacity, because our orderbooks are empty'

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Coat

@123etc Re: 'strong bench strenth'???

Yep. Credit where credit is due, our Indian brethren do sometimes have a very charming and creative way to present nasty facts. "Bench strength": sounds like a good thing ;)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 'strong bench strenth'???

Sure it's not a football analogy? Although I like the gym one :)

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Big Brother

Get another example of Political Risks offshore

This is another example of the kinds of political risks you get by offshoring, that the consultants always seem to forget to mention.

i.e. the country has a history of relgious and political violiance that can distrupt operations.

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Anonymous Coward

I think possibly you are being a little coy about the "indoor toilet" part, unless of course, you mean "the outdoors" as the de-facto alternative, somewhat akin to Gardy-Loo era Blighty, but of course us Brits were "posh" and used a basin or suchlike before shouting the required warning and flinging it out a window ;)

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Anonymous Coward

"However, analysts weren't too worried..."

"... about any knock-on effect harming output in the IT centre of Bangalore."

Oh good. Nothing to worry about then.

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