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back to article New target for 419 fraudsters: Struggling 'weak' banks

Desperate banks have become the target for so-called 419 advance-fee fraud scams. Increased regulatory scrutiny in the wake of the credit crunch and subsequent banking failures might be expected to deter banks from entertaining investment or deposit offers that come with up-front fees, payable by the bank, attached. But many …

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Angel

Cheering for the boys from Lagos this time! Sounds like the banks are getting what they deserve considering its basically what they have been doing to us for such a long time.

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Facepalm

Won't be long

Parliamentary investigation committee,

'Mr Diamond at what stage, as CEO of one of the largest banking groups did you decide that investing in Ripemoff Ltd would be a good idea' asked Keith Vaz MP.

'Well Keith it was like this, we needed the cash right, we needed it quick cos you we're about to investigate us like'

'At what point did you realise the investment was a mistake?'

'We tranfered the money and then tried to contact this guy called Mr F Ewe, but his phone was cut off...'

'Silly thing to do don't you think?

'No way, it was a great opportunity to use other people's money to gamble a bit on the markets you know'

'Didn't work did it Mr Diamond'

'Come on Keith, like you never took a chance...'

'

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Facepalm

Though I'm not sure how far they'll get this time. After all, between their poor English and barely-coherent tales of fleeing far-land rich men, they've only ever managed to fool excessively gullible people, the kind who believes wealth will just pop out of thin air and...

Oh.

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Anonymous Coward

The sad thing...

Is that we taxpayers have already bailed out the really dodgy banks.

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Devil

you mean...

There's stealing bastards stealing from the stealing bastards who stole from the bastards that stole from Joe Public..

Nice going there...

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Meh

Like they say:

No honor amongst thieves.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: you mean...

While the stealing bastard Joe Public thought they were stealing from the stealing bastard banks by getting mortgages they couldn't afford.

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Facepalm

Steal 100K and you're a criminal

Steal 100 million and you"re "too big to fail"

//sad thing is that in the end, it's always you and me what pays

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Steal 100K and you're a criminal

People keep saying this, it's really not true.

The government didn't drive a dump truck full of money to the banks doors and just drop it off.

There's plenty of strings attached, the government has either extended them large loans which will have to be repaid + interest (so joe public get their money back and then some) or has bought the banks stocks and will hold onto them until they rise back up and can be sold on for a healthy profit.

Unless the bank completely collapses the public money is safe and even earning us a little.

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I really want to say that there is no way a bank could fall for this. I said want to not that I could.

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Anonymous Coward

I'm an American. I.B. Stewpid from Podunk, Iowa.

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Happy

0wned.

That is all.

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Joke

Might as well just merg the banks with the scammers old friend

NatWestern Union | Bank & Money Transfer

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Thumb Up

Oooooh, lady Fanny

Cheers for the Dirty Rotten Scoundrels reference....is it referring to the lads from Lagos or the American banks, hmmmm

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foomf

"You'd expect bankers to be wise to this sort of shenanigan". Anyone who remembers some of the classic S&L shenanigans of the 1980s or for that matter Countrywide Mortgage in the oughts, will understand that the Lads from Lagos are up against the experts.

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Re: foomf

It would be funny if the banks did rip the Lads from Lagos off.

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Expect what, now?

You'd expect bankers to be wise to this sort of shenanigan...

No, I wouldn't, and I wonder why anyone would. Just look at some of the other victims of 419 scams, like Thomas Katona or Ann Marie Poet. Those are financial professionals who not only fell for advance-fee scams but then embezzled millions from their employers to participate in them.

Working with money does not automatically confer financial wisdom, or even good sense.

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